Morning walk

  • 446 Replies
  • 54227 Views
*

Charithea

  • Hero Member
Re: Morning walk
« Reply #285 on: February 18, 2019, 01:18:18 PM »
I am in agreement with you Carole.  Anticipation of what will pop up next keeps me walking around the garden every morning even in a heavy down pour. The perfume of tha Daphne and Sarcococa can only be immagined now. They refuse to grow here and even the Lonicera struggles. The last few trips to Italian and Spanish gardens  made me aware of how many of their plants are also growing in our garden. The difference was that theirs were in their glory while ours just survived. Now with the heavy and continual rain ours are flourishing. So, long may the rainy season continue.
I garden in Cyprus, in a flat old farming field, alt. approx. 30 m asl.

*

John J

  • Hero Member
Re: Morning walk
« Reply #286 on: February 24, 2019, 11:54:49 AM »
Not so much an early morning walk today as a late morning one.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

Hilary

  • Hero Member
Re: Morning walk
« Reply #287 on: February 24, 2019, 02:03:26 PM »
What a great collection of flowers today.
What is the second one with the purple flowers.
It looks good enough to feature on a postage stamp!
MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

*

John J

  • Hero Member
Re: Morning walk
« Reply #288 on: February 24, 2019, 03:20:47 PM »
It would have to be an Australian one, Hilary. It's Hardenbergia violacea.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

David Dickinson

  • Hero Member
    • Email
Re: Morning walk
« Reply #289 on: February 24, 2019, 08:31:42 PM »
I was following your discussion re Italy/Cyprus situation and your present spell of rainy weather and thought I would look around my very small garden to see what flowers were out. Rome is cold at the moment with very cold nights still so Cyprus winds hands down. But there were a few things on flower including some early crocuses which I didn't put in the photos below.
It is interesting to see that the red form of Anamatheca (Freesia) laxis flowers in spring. This pale blue form developed flower buds in late autumn and they opened a couple of weeks ago. That may be because I sowed the seeds last spring and this year it might settle down to spring flowering. I am hoping not for 2 reasons. Firstly, It is nice to have something which is winter flowering and, secondly, this way there will be no cross pollination and I will be able to produce seed of the subspecies 'Azurea'

Anamatheca (Freesia) laxis susp Azurea (which totally refused to behave while having its photo taken)
Bidens (orange) (Quite a lot of flowers but much smaller than those of the summer months)
Buddleja madagascariensis
Erysimum 'Red Jep'
Hardenbergia violacea Alba
Justicia brandegeeana
Salvia 'Anthony Parker' (A few remnants of flowers from last autumn)
I have a small garden in Rome, Italy. Some open soil, some concrete, some paved. Temperatures in winter occasionally down to 0C. Summer temperatures up to 40C in the shade. There are never watering restrictions but, of course, there is little natural water for much of June, July and August.

*

Fermi

  • Hero Member
    • Email
Re: Morning walk
« Reply #290 on: February 26, 2019, 12:31:59 PM »
It would have to be an Australian one, Hilary. It's Hardenbergia violacea.
Like this one: https://www.anbg.gov.au/stamps/stamp-garden-a-2000.html
cheers
fermi
Mr F de Sousa, Central Victoria, Australia
member of AGS, SRGC, NARGS
working as a physio to support my gardening habit!

Hilary

  • Hero Member
Re: Morning walk
« Reply #291 on: February 26, 2019, 02:15:07 PM »
That seems to be the only postage stamp featuring Hardenbergia violacea  Fermi and I don't have it .
However , you have done the work for me .
The link looks useful also
MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

*

John J

  • Hero Member
Re: Morning walk
« Reply #292 on: February 27, 2019, 09:26:12 AM »
A rather wet and windy walk this morning, so I took just the one photo. This Alyogyne huegelii 'Santa Cruz' had buds ready to open yesterday so I was looking forward to seeing its first flowers of the season this morning. A severe thunderstorm overnight with heavy rain put an end to that. This morning dawned very windy with threats of possibly more rain to come so I may have to wait a bit longer to see it at its best.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

*

John J

  • Hero Member
Re: Morning walk
« Reply #293 on: February 27, 2019, 01:25:53 PM »
The high winds seem to have broken up the cloud and averted the threatened rain, at least for now, so I had another go at photographing the flowers that have now opened. Problem was they wouldn't stay still while I did it.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

Umbrian

  • Hero Member
    • Email
Re: Morning walk
« Reply #294 on: February 28, 2019, 07:49:31 AM »
Lovely John - beautiful arrangement of petals. I tried it here once but with no success. Glad you are still getting rain- we are enjoying weeks of sunshine and unusually high daytime temperatures but really need some rain as we have had very little this winter and the recent Tramontana winds have further dried the soil.


MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.

*

John J

  • Hero Member
Re: Morning walk
« Reply #295 on: March 04, 2019, 08:50:13 AM »
Following a wet Sunday, Monday has dawned bright and sunny although a little chilly. So I have taken a few photos of what is in flower, both cultivated and wild.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

*

Alisdair

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
Re: Morning walk
« Reply #296 on: March 04, 2019, 09:09:20 AM »
So glad you got out for such a set of sunlit beauties, John, after spending so much time locked into sorting out all the stuff you've been having to do, setting up the Society's trip to Jordan next year!
Alisdair Aird
Gardens in SE England (Sussex); also coastal Southern Greece, and (in a very small way) South West France; MGS member (and former president); vice chairman RHS Lily Group, past chairman Cyclamen Society

*

John J

  • Hero Member
Re: Morning walk
« Reply #297 on: March 08, 2019, 07:40:53 AM »
Due to a variety of reasons my morning strolls have been severely limited of late, so this morning I made a special effort to go out and see what was in flower.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

David Dickinson

  • Hero Member
    • Email
Re: Morning walk
« Reply #298 on: March 08, 2019, 10:28:57 AM »
My garden is producing these flowers at the moment. First, a better photo of Anomatheca laxa susp Azurea than the last one. Then, Crocus 'Cream Beauty', Leucojum vernum, Narcisus 'Ice Follies', 'Itzim' and 'Tete a Tete', Scilla tuberginiana, Vinca difformis 'Jenny Pym' and Vinca minor 'Illumination'

I am having  great success with Vinca major 'Maculata' in deep shade and slightly less success with Vinca minor (both the blue and the white forms) in the same area. None of them have flowered but the 'Maculata' has lovely leaves and is spreading nicely. The Vinca minor is slowly spreading but I think I will move it to a slightly less shady place.  This success prompted me to experiment with the two Vincas included in the photos and a purple version of Vinca  minor. They were bought in the UK last are autumn and are still in the pots where I put them,  in constant but light shade.
I have a small garden in Rome, Italy. Some open soil, some concrete, some paved. Temperatures in winter occasionally down to 0C. Summer temperatures up to 40C in the shade. There are never watering restrictions but, of course, there is little natural water for much of June, July and August.

*

Alisdair

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
Re: Morning walk
« Reply #299 on: March 09, 2019, 08:36:02 AM »
Thanks for the names, David! (And of course the lovely pictures....)

- Originally I'd wrongly attributed the pictures to John - until Carole kindly corrected me. Sorry, David!
« Last Edit: March 10, 2019, 11:09:41 AM by Alisdair »
Alisdair Aird
Gardens in SE England (Sussex); also coastal Southern Greece, and (in a very small way) South West France; MGS member (and former president); vice chairman RHS Lily Group, past chairman Cyclamen Society