Morning walk

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John J

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Re: Morning walk
« Reply #315 on: April 01, 2019, 06:17:41 AM »
To be honest, David, I don't know. They came up in a place that we planted Acidanthera bulbs some years ago. They put up foliage but never flowered and then disappeared. Now this year these have come up, they seem to have a similar shaped flower to the ones we planted but the colouring is all wrong.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

Umbrian

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Re: Morning walk
« Reply #316 on: April 01, 2019, 07:38:12 AM »
Beautiful Osteospernum David, something I was hoping to get established in my more sheltered town garden but so far no joy - must try again this summer.
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.

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Alisdair

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Re: Morning walk - John's non-Acidanthera
« Reply #317 on: April 01, 2019, 09:41:05 AM »
Gladiolus tristis perhaps? It does seed itself around, and flowers quite quickly from seed.
Alisdair Aird
Gardens in SE England (Sussex); also coastal Southern Greece, and (in a very small way) South West France; MGS member (and former president); vice chairman RHS Lily Group, past chairman Cyclamen Society

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John J

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Re: Morning walk
« Reply #318 on: April 01, 2019, 01:16:22 PM »
Certainly a possibility, Alisdair, but if so I've no idea where they came from. The only things I can recall planting in that position were Acidanthera murielae that I brought back from Chelsea several years ago but that never flowered before disappearing altogether. I can't even believe that they were mistakenly labelled as I shared them with my sister in UK before I left and hers flowered for a couple of years before calling it a day.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

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John J

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Re: Morning walk
« Reply #319 on: April 02, 2019, 06:54:33 AM »
Alisdair, Thea might have solved the mystery. She was sorting through some old seed packets and found an envelope with "seeds from cream lily-like flowers, Sparoza" written on it. So, does Sally have Gladiolus tristis growing there?
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

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Alisdair

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Re: Morning walk
« Reply #320 on: April 03, 2019, 08:57:21 AM »
Yes, she does - and she complains that it seeds itself about there rather too freely!!
Alisdair Aird
Gardens in SE England (Sussex); also coastal Southern Greece, and (in a very small way) South West France; MGS member (and former president); vice chairman RHS Lily Group, past chairman Cyclamen Society

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Alisdair

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Re: Morning walk
« Reply #321 on: April 03, 2019, 08:58:44 AM »
... and arriving at our Greek house yesterday, we found it in full flower, some already gone over - and it's seeded itself here and there too.
Alisdair Aird
Gardens in SE England (Sussex); also coastal Southern Greece, and (in a very small way) South West France; MGS member (and former president); vice chairman RHS Lily Group, past chairman Cyclamen Society

David Dickinson

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Re: Morning walk
« Reply #322 on: April 04, 2019, 12:49:49 AM »
Thanks John and Alisdair for the information re Gladiolus tristis. I have just checked and Chantal has it in her seed bank for any members who might be interested.
I have a small garden in Rome, Italy. Some open soil, some concrete, some paved. Temperatures in winter occasionally down to 0C. Summer temperatures up to 40C in the shade. There are never watering restrictions but, of course, there is little natural water for much of June, July and August.

David Dickinson

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Re: Morning walk
« Reply #323 on: April 06, 2019, 11:15:20 AM »
Winter also back here with very heavy rain and cool days and cold nights. At least that might spur the seeds into action. I fear that a couple of weeks ago many of mine may have cooked! A few flowers around though. Freesia "Blue Moon" and a red hybrid. Also an Iris that I vaguely recall buying about 10 years ago (and which I thought had died just as many years ago) has sprung up from nowhere. I will have to seek out some of my old records to see if I can find its name.
I have a small garden in Rome, Italy. Some open soil, some concrete, some paved. Temperatures in winter occasionally down to 0C. Summer temperatures up to 40C in the shade. There are never watering restrictions but, of course, there is little natural water for much of June, July and August.

David Dickinson

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Re: Morning walk
« Reply #324 on: April 10, 2019, 10:28:34 AM »
Today is a very miserable day here in Rome so here are a few photos I took yesterday. Two very pale flowers, Narcissus 'Polar Ice' and Aquilegia hybrid, to contrast with the bold yellow of Erysimum linifolium 'Fragrant Sunshine'. The latter is a new plant but it seems to be doing very well. Let's see how it copes with the summer heat.
I have a small garden in Rome, Italy. Some open soil, some concrete, some paved. Temperatures in winter occasionally down to 0C. Summer temperatures up to 40C in the shade. There are never watering restrictions but, of course, there is little natural water for much of June, July and August.

Umbrian

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Re: Morning walk
« Reply #325 on: April 11, 2019, 07:34:46 AM »
Lovely Narcissus David....
I have always thought Erysium should do well in Italy but have never managed to keep them for long. "Bowles Mauve" is an old favourite that I have tried on several occasions and have just obtained again along with a beautiful deep red - orange hybriid one called ' Red Jep'
All the more annoying as I have seen wild yellow ones growing prolifically in old walls in my area.
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.

David Dickinson

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Re: Morning walk
« Reply #326 on: April 12, 2019, 12:32:27 AM »
Hi Umbrian

I am having success with perennial Erysimums here in Rome. My 'Bowles Mauve is just coming into flower and has been with me for 3 years. It is in a slightly shady spot but is doing very well. I have taken cuttings as  they have a reputation for being short lived. Let's hope they take. I also have 'Red Jep' which is now full of flowers. (I posted a photo in this thread as it was just coming into flower, p20). I have had that since last spring and from being a very small plant it is now almost as big as my 'Bowles Mauve' It is in full sun from early morning to late afternoon. The Erysimum linifolium 'Fragrant Sunshine' was bought in the UK a couple of months ago, So far it seems to be doing well
« Last Edit: April 12, 2019, 08:17:40 AM by Alisdair »
I have a small garden in Rome, Italy. Some open soil, some concrete, some paved. Temperatures in winter occasionally down to 0C. Summer temperatures up to 40C in the shade. There are never watering restrictions but, of course, there is little natural water for much of June, July and August.

Umbrian

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Re: Morning walk
« Reply #327 on: April 12, 2019, 06:44:27 AM »
Thanks for the encouragement David.....if at first you don't succeed.....
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.

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John J

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Re: Morning walk
« Reply #328 on: April 21, 2019, 04:40:06 PM »
Morning walk is a bit of a misnomer today. My usual strolls have been rather curtailed recently for a variety of reasons, but this evening I made a special effort to record a few of the plants that are in flower. Not without its trials I might add as the mosquitoes seem to be especially active at this time, and there are a lot of them. My hands and face being the main targets for their attention.
Anyway, below are some of the photos I managed to get.
I don't name the plants that I put on these posts as I like to give members a bit of a test to see if they recognise them. If not they can always ask.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

Umbrian

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Re: Morning walk
« Reply #329 on: April 22, 2019, 06:50:46 AM »
After some very much needed rain last weekend things are really moving in the garden now with Cistus, Iris and Roses bursting into flower. However the purpose of this post is to praise the longevity of my Coronilla glauca that first came into flower in early March and is still going strong providing a bright splash of colour and a rich hunting ground for bees. Some spring flowering shrubs are over very quickly once temperatures rise and the sun more in evidence but the Coronilla seems to thrive in these conditions. Am going to try to add a photo but am having trouble with my Photogene⁴ app still...... 
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.