My back garden this morning

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Caroline

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My back garden this morning
« on: October 26, 2015, 04:54:00 AM »
..with rampant Gladiolus carneus.  But I can forgive its spreading habits, and put up with the dying leaves later on, for the lovely effect at this time of year.
« Last Edit: October 27, 2015, 07:49:03 PM by Fleur Pavlidis »
I am establishing a garden on Waiheke Island, 35 minutes out of Auckland. The site is windy, the clay soil dries out quickly in summer and is like plasticine in winter, but it is still very rewarding. Water is an issue, as we depend on tanks. I'm looking forward to sharing ideas. Caroline

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Fermi

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Re: My back garden this morning
« Reply #1 on: October 26, 2015, 12:27:21 PM »
It does look impressive, Caroline.
I wish it did a well in our garden!
cheers
fermi
Mr F de Sousa, Central Victoria, Australia
member of AGS, SRGC, NARGS
working as a physio to support my gardening habit!

Caroline

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Re: My back garden this morning
« Reply #2 on: October 26, 2015, 09:19:32 PM »
Thanks Fermi - how was your visit to Otago? It looked as if you were going to be caught by gale-force winds!
I am establishing a garden on Waiheke Island, 35 minutes out of Auckland. The site is windy, the clay soil dries out quickly in summer and is like plasticine in winter, but it is still very rewarding. Water is an issue, as we depend on tanks. I'm looking forward to sharing ideas. Caroline

Caroline

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Re: My back garden this morning
« Reply #3 on: November 04, 2016, 11:31:55 PM »
A shot of another part of the back garden this morning.  By trial and error, I am gradually working out what does best on this not very hospitable bank.  There have been a few casualties along the way.
I am establishing a garden on Waiheke Island, 35 minutes out of Auckland. The site is windy, the clay soil dries out quickly in summer and is like plasticine in winter, but it is still very rewarding. Water is an issue, as we depend on tanks. I'm looking forward to sharing ideas. Caroline

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Fermi

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Re: My back garden this morning
« Reply #4 on: November 05, 2016, 11:50:50 AM »
Snap!
Hi Caroline,
California poppies are a big part of our late spring gardens,
cheers
fermi
Mr F de Sousa, Central Victoria, Australia
member of AGS, SRGC, NARGS
working as a physio to support my gardening habit!

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Charithea

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Re: My back garden this morning
« Reply #5 on: November 05, 2016, 05:47:53 PM »
How very beautiful both gardens look. I am trying not to feel jealous . My Californian poppies did well the first year after I bought five packets and sprinkled them in one place. The year after a few of their seeds grew and our cats used to run through them a flattened them. I bought more packets and I had not luck.  I blamed it on the lack of rain.  I am wondering if I should try again or stick to my Nigellas which seem cat proof and don't mind going thirsty.
I garden in Cyprus, in a flat old farming field, alt. approx. 30 m asl.

Caroline

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Re: My back garden this morning
« Reply #6 on: November 06, 2016, 12:18:25 AM »
Hi Charithea - I envy you your success with Nigella/love-in-a-mist.  I grow them under much the same conditions as the California poppies (inhospitable clay, not much water), but the Nigella look stunted.  They germinate happily, but come to a halt (and flower) at about 20cm.  I shouldn't complain, I always saw them as fillers while the shrubs got going. 
I am establishing a garden on Waiheke Island, 35 minutes out of Auckland. The site is windy, the clay soil dries out quickly in summer and is like plasticine in winter, but it is still very rewarding. Water is an issue, as we depend on tanks. I'm looking forward to sharing ideas. Caroline

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Fermi

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Re: My back garden this morning
« Reply #7 on: November 06, 2016, 11:56:17 AM »
Hi Caroline,
I'm keen about using bulbs which are adapted to our climate and the Ixias derived from Ixia viridiflora hybrid 'Teal' have self-seeded in one area to make a lovely show at this time of year.
Are they available in NZ? Are they allowed in? Let me know if you want to try some seed let me know,
cheers
fermi
Mr F de Sousa, Central Victoria, Australia
member of AGS, SRGC, NARGS
working as a physio to support my gardening habit!

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Charithea

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Re: My back garden this morning
« Reply #8 on: November 06, 2016, 03:55:53 PM »
Here is a picture of my solitary Eschscholzia californica which flowered in March. It is a lovely colour but a few more would have been welcomed. Fermi, your Ixia viridiflora are enviable. I tell myself I have to be happy with what I can grow but ....
« Last Edit: November 07, 2016, 10:53:00 AM by Charithea »
I garden in Cyprus, in a flat old farming field, alt. approx. 30 m asl.

Caroline

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Re: My back garden this morning
« Reply #9 on: November 07, 2016, 06:19:53 AM »
The offer of seed ofIxia viridiflora x teal is very tempting, thank you Fermi, but the import regulations are all but insuperable  :(  A shame, because we have the common or garden ixias naturalised under the olives, and "Teal" would be a lovely addition.  I've never seen that particular cultivar offered, although I. viridiflora is available
I am establishing a garden on Waiheke Island, 35 minutes out of Auckland. The site is windy, the clay soil dries out quickly in summer and is like plasticine in winter, but it is still very rewarding. Water is an issue, as we depend on tanks. I'm looking forward to sharing ideas. Caroline