Fruit/Veg of the day

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John J

  • Hero Member
Re: Fruit/Veg of the day
« Reply #15 on: September 23, 2015, 09:11:53 AM »
David, I have to confess to not having a lot of personal experience of this fruit, we only acquired our tree last year. Apparently they stay quite small and so are suitable for growing in containers. Info says they are more cold hardy than limes, down to around 10*C. We have found the taste to be similar to lime, a sort of bitter-sweet, acidic taste. It seems they are suitable for making marmalade or for juicing.
« Last Edit: September 24, 2015, 05:07:11 AM by John J »
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

Joanna Savage

  • Sr. Member
Re: Fruit/Veg of the day - Arbutus unedo
« Reply #16 on: September 23, 2015, 05:02:31 PM »
This is a much colder garden in Toscana than John J's delicious looking fruit orchard in Cyprus. However, here is an Arbutus unedo just beginning to redden and looking fat after good rain. They look better than they taste.
« Last Edit: September 24, 2015, 09:56:49 AM by Alisdair »

Joanna Savage

  • Sr. Member
Re: Fruit/Veg/Herbs of the day - "Greek basil"
« Reply #17 on: September 23, 2015, 05:06:21 PM »
And here is a pot of so-called (by the nursery)  Greek Basil, ready to be cut and dried in a cool place for winter pasta dishes.
« Last Edit: September 24, 2015, 09:57:45 AM by Alisdair »

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John J

  • Hero Member
Re: Fruit/Veg of the day - Medlar
« Reply #18 on: September 24, 2015, 05:04:05 AM »
Joanna, thanks for those and for reminding us that herbs deserve to be included in this category too.
Our Mespilus germanica is grown more for its ornamental value than for its fruit. These need to be subjected to a period of cold, even frost, before becoming softened/ripe enough to eat, a process known as bletting. This can be done artificially by storing them in the fridge for a while but we've never found it to be worth the effort.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

Caroline

  • Full Member
Re: Fruit/Veg of the day (limequats)
« Reply #19 on: September 24, 2015, 06:58:06 AM »
I have a whole hedge of limequats across the end of the veggie garden, put in to provide a screen.  They have been in about 4 years, and are now cropping really well. In response to David's question about using them,  I make a good sour marmalade and recently tried a hot chutney which is delicious.  More generally, I substitute the juice for either lime or lemon juice (a mexican lime squeezer helps as they are very "pippy").
« Last Edit: September 24, 2015, 09:58:24 AM by Alisdair »
I am establishing a garden on Waiheke Island, 35 minutes out of Auckland. The site is windy, the clay soil dries out quickly in summer and is like plasticine in winter, but it is still very rewarding. Water is an issue, as we depend on tanks. I'm looking forward to sharing ideas. Caroline

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John J

  • Hero Member
Re: Fruit/Veg of the day - Myrtle
« Reply #20 on: September 25, 2015, 04:48:47 AM »
The myrtle is one of the plants that is associated with Aphrodite, she who was born of the sea off Paphos. When she emerged from the waves she hid her nakedness behind a myrtle bush.
Providing bowls of myrtle berries on a dining table so that the diners could chew them in order to freshen their mouths and taste buds between courses is another of those traditions that has largely disappeared.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

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John J

  • Hero Member
Re: Fruit/Veg of the day - Pomegranate
« Reply #21 on: September 26, 2015, 08:24:54 AM »
The pomegranates are ripening nicely, soon be ready.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

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John J

  • Hero Member
Re: Fruit/Veg of the day
« Reply #22 on: September 26, 2015, 02:41:46 PM »
In fact one variety is ready as the birds have already discovered! Anyway, we can't begrudge them a few as there should still be plenty left for us.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

Joanna Savage

  • Sr. Member
Re: Fruit/Veg of the day
« Reply #23 on: September 26, 2015, 06:03:44 PM »
John, how do you eat your pomegranates? I was intrigued by the idea of pomegranate juice when I was in Iran. It crops up in many dishes.How on earth does one  extract juice from a pomegranate?

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John J

  • Hero Member
Re: Fruit/Veg of the day
« Reply #24 on: September 27, 2015, 04:52:50 AM »
Hi Joanna, pomegranate juice is available commercially but my wife's sister makes her own. You need a variety that is full of juice, more flesh than pip, put the seeds into a blender/liquidiser and strain the juice.
As for eating them we usually add them to salads. For instance, mix them with rocula, sun-dried tomatoes soaked in vinegar, olive oil and balsamic vinegar to taste.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

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John J

  • Hero Member
Re: Fruit/Veg of the day - Fig
« Reply #25 on: September 27, 2015, 04:59:54 AM »
We've been enjoying a daily ration of figs for a few weeks too. ;)
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

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Fermi

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Re: Fruit/Veg of the day
« Reply #26 on: September 27, 2015, 11:39:06 AM »
Our current (newly minted) Prime Minister, Malcolm Turnbull, was on a program a year or two ago called "Kitchen Cabinet" and revealed the secret of peeling the pomegranates into a bowl of water, the fleshy pips sink and the inedible pith floats.
Who knows where his wisdom will lead our country :-\
cheers
fermi
Mr F de Sousa, Central Victoria, Australia
member of AGS, SRGC, NARGS
working as a physio to support my gardening habit!

Alice

  • Hero Member
Re: Fruit/Veg of the day
« Reply #27 on: September 27, 2015, 06:55:02 PM »
John, how do you eat your pomegranates? I was intrigued by the idea of pomegranate juice when I was in Iran. It crops up in many dishes.How on earth does one  extract juice from a pomegranate?
Joanna, to get the juice I treat them like lemons. Cut in half and extract the juice using a manual or electric juicer.
Amateur gardener who has gardened in north London and now gardens part of the year on the Cycladic island of Paros. Conditions: coastal, windy, annual rainfall 350mm, temp 0-35 degrees C.

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John J

  • Hero Member
Re: Fruit/Veg of the day - Grapes
« Reply #28 on: September 28, 2015, 05:05:09 AM »
We don't have many vines and I have no idea what the variety is but they provide us with a few bunches of small, sweet fruit every year.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

SusanIbiza

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Re: Fruit/Veg of the day
« Reply #29 on: September 28, 2015, 08:59:46 AM »
We cut the pomegranate in half crosswise, then whack the outside smartly with a wooden spoon (kept your fingers out of the way).  Do this over a bowl so that you don't waste any of the juice.  The seeds are delicious in salads and as a finish to cous cous and many Mediterranean dishes.
Now gardening in Ibiza, Balearics having moved last year from Queensland, Australia.  Mediterranean gardening is my challenge now, there is such a lot to learn, but it is lots of fun.