Plant of the Day

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John J

  • Hero Member
Asphodeline lutea
« Reply #15 on: May 30, 2015, 04:58:52 AM »
How's this for a tough plant capable of growing in the most demanding conditions? Asphodeline lutea.
« Last Edit: July 19, 2015, 09:45:47 AM by Alisdair »
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

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John J

  • Hero Member
Neotinea tridentata
« Reply #16 on: May 31, 2015, 04:40:56 AM »
Among the many orchids we found was this beautiful three-toothed orchid, Neotinea tridentata.
« Last Edit: July 19, 2015, 09:46:02 AM by Alisdair »
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

Hilary

  • Hero Member
Re: Plant of the Day
« Reply #17 on: May 31, 2015, 04:16:29 PM »
I am enjoying your daily photo of flowers and places.
I wonder if, for future reference purposes, you shouldn't add a little note 'Epirus, May' ' Morocco'
MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

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John J

  • Hero Member
Paeonia peregrina
« Reply #18 on: June 01, 2015, 04:48:57 AM »
On the trip to Epirus in May we were on the lookout for one particular plant but all we ever found was rosettes of foliage and evidence of flowering being over. We had almost given up hope when our guide, Chris Gardener, spotted this beauty. Paeonia peregrina.
« Last Edit: July 19, 2015, 09:46:26 AM by Alisdair »
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

royscot

  • Newbie
    • Email
Recommended Mediterranean gardening books
« Reply #19 on: June 01, 2015, 12:18:37 PM »
Sorry John, been out of touch with the internet for a few days. Thanks for your input. You are right, there is no real shortcut to finding out about the most suitable plants and I shall trawl the site with interest. I have Olivier Filippi's Dry Gardening Handbook so that should keep me right!

Just keep posting the photos!

Roy
« Last Edit: July 19, 2015, 09:49:10 AM by Alisdair »

Alice

  • Hero Member
Pomegranate flowers
« Reply #20 on: June 01, 2015, 04:24:07 PM »
This bee seems to appreciate the pomegranate flowers, which are abundant at the moment.
« Last Edit: July 19, 2015, 09:47:00 AM by Alisdair »
Amateur gardener who has gardened in north London and now gardens part of the year on the Cycladic island of Paros. Conditions: coastal, windy, annual rainfall 350mm, temp 0-35 degrees C.

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John J

  • Hero Member
Helleborus cyclophyllus
« Reply #21 on: June 02, 2015, 05:59:23 AM »
On the recent MGS trip to Epirus (May 2015) we found Helleborus cyclophyllus almost everywhere we went.
« Last Edit: July 19, 2015, 09:47:15 AM by Alisdair »
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

Caroline

  • Full Member
Mediterranean gardening books
« Reply #22 on: June 02, 2015, 08:34:26 AM »
There are three other excellent books I would recommend if you haven't already got hold of them, Roy.  They are: "Gardens of the Sun" by Trevor Nottle, which is both a good read and thought-provoking: "Gardening the Mediterranean Way" by Heidi Gildemeister, and "The Mediterranean Gardener" by Hugo Latymer, which is older and has lots of plant lists and descriptions.
« Last Edit: July 19, 2015, 09:48:29 AM by Alisdair »
I am establishing a garden on Waiheke Island, 35 minutes out of Auckland. The site is windy, the clay soil dries out quickly in summer and is like plasticine in winter, but it is still very rewarding. Water is an issue, as we depend on tanks. I'm looking forward to sharing ideas. Caroline

Joanna Savage

  • Sr. Member
Re: Plant of the Day
« Reply #23 on: June 02, 2015, 08:53:55 AM »

Looking at the annual poppies in Alisdair's FB page today,
see www.facebook.com/MediterraneanGardenSociety
 I am again surprised that poppies have only four petals. With all those stamens and seeds I would have expected five. As far as I recall from a long time ago, those plants with many parts in their flowers were regarded as being earlier on the evolutionary scale and I have always, perhaps mistakenly,thought of poppies  as simple early flowers. Would someone please set me right on this query.
Incidentally, referring to Chris Grey Wilson's, Poppies, I see that the word Papaver may derive from the sound made when eating poppy seeds  or it might come from papa, referring to the liquid in the stem which was given to children to keep them quiet.

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John J

  • Hero Member
Re: Plant of the Day
« Reply #24 on: June 03, 2015, 04:41:25 AM »
Looking down into Albania from the village of Molivdoskepasto on the MGS Epirus trip in May.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

royscot

  • Newbie
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Re: Recommended Mediterranean gardening books
« Reply #25 on: June 03, 2015, 09:26:24 AM »
Thanks Caroline. Have recently purchased Heidi's book and already have the last one. Will look out for Trevor's.
« Last Edit: July 19, 2015, 09:50:18 AM by Alisdair »

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John J

  • Hero Member
Plant of the Day - Acanthus mollis
« Reply #26 on: June 04, 2015, 04:54:53 AM »
Following up on Roy's suggestion regarding posting photos and info about plants that are worthy of being recommended for use in water-wise gardens. Maybe it should be adopted. Reading about plants in books is an excellent resource but to have that info reinforced, or otherwise, by people who have experience of growing them in differing conditions can prove invaluable.
So, subject to the approval of the Forum Moderators, I'd like to attempt to produce at least one plant a day that arguably warrants a place in water-wise gardens. I may not be successful but in the words of the Beatles; "I can try with a little help from my friends". What do you think?
What better plant to start the ball rolling than the symbol of the MGS itself, Acanthus mollis.

A strongly architectural plant that requires absolutely minimal care. Its root system lies in the ground waiting for the winter rains before sending up those enormous leaves so familiar from ancient Corinthian columns. These are followed by the unmistakable flower spikes. It needs no supplementary water as it dies down in the summer, merely requiring a little tidying up as it becomes too messy.
« Last Edit: July 19, 2015, 09:51:24 AM by Alisdair »
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

Hilary

  • Hero Member
Re: Acanthus mollis
« Reply #27 on: June 04, 2015, 07:47:58 AM »
It sounds like a good idea but on the other hand it sounds like a lot of work, especially if you are spending a lot of time already gardening, looking after grandchildren and swimming in the sea
.
There are many posts scattered all over the Forum dealing with plants suitable for water-wise gardens. Maybe you could track them all down first then refer to one daily

Since you started off with Acanthus mollis I am posting a couple of photos i took a week or so ago of some Acanthus plants  surrounding a Carob tree in a bed outside the Corinth Court House. I don't think they get watered at all
« Last Edit: July 19, 2015, 09:51:47 AM by Alisdair »
MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

Daisy

  • Sr. Member
Re: Plant of the Day
« Reply #28 on: June 04, 2015, 08:31:36 AM »


 

 



Just to let you all know how much I have been enjoying all of your posts and photos, even though I cannot reply much at present.
At the end of April I managed to break my leg and after some complications and a stay in hospital, I am back home with strict instructions to lay with my leg up most of the time.
I cannot manage the step into the bedroom on my crutches, so have to lie on the bed settee in front of the television and the front door.
I can read all of your posts on the television which is connected to another  computer, but cannot reply, apart from shouting at the screen, which I do a lot.
As my husband normally watches a lot more television than I do, it is only fair that he takes over this lap top at present. So if anyone replies to this post, it may be a while before I respond.
Luckily, I have a good view out of the front door to my pots and the village footpath, so I have taken a few photos from my bed, which you can see above.
Daisy :)

Amateur gardener, who has gardened in Surrey and Cornwall, England, but now has a tiny garden facing north west, near the coast in north east Crete. It is 300 meters above sea level. On a steep learning curve!!! Member of both MGS and RHS

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John J

  • Hero Member
Re: Plant of the Day
« Reply #29 on: June 04, 2015, 11:52:28 AM »
Who gets time to swim in the sea!? This is where I'm hoping for assistance from Forum friends to help out with their photos and experiences, good and bad, of growing a variety of plants. Thanks for your latest contribution, Hilary.
Daisy, sorry to hear about your mishap, get well soon and we'll look forward to getting you back on the Forum in due course.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)