Plant of the Day

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John J

  • Hero Member
Plant of the Day
« on: May 15, 2015, 06:15:53 AM »
I do not profess to be a great photographer, or even a particularly good one, there are posters out there who are far better than I, so perhaps we could take up Alisdair's suggestion (challenge?) regarding posting a daily photo. I can't promise to produce one on a daily basis, especially since next week I'll be away in northern Greece on a MGS organised walking tour. That may provide a fund of shots for the future with luck. The photos don't need to be on any particular topic,    just anything that might prove of interest or merely be a pleasure to look at to brighten the day.
One of our habits on getting up in the morning is to make a cup of tea and wander around the garden to see what has happened or opened overnight. This morning we found our first open flower of Oenothera biennis. What could be a brighter start to the day than this, reflecting the rising sun.
« Last Edit: July 20, 2015, 09:54:23 AM by Alisdair »
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

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Pauline

  • Jr. Member
Re: Plant of the Day
« Reply #1 on: May 15, 2015, 11:19:16 AM »
I love Facebook - but not for anything apart from chit-chat and ephemeral stuff. It's an excellent and easy way of keeping up with friends and far-flung family, and has put me in touch with several people I had lost track of and would never have found otherwise. It's great for showing pictures but it's absolutely useless for the other stuff we do in here, mainly because it is so ephemeral and you can't search.

It's a sad truth that FB has been slowly killing off forums that previously thrived, and in the case of the specialist ones (such as Real Gardeners and Photography Cafe) it's a real shame.
I don't, alas, have any suggestions. I've always thought it was possible to do more than one thing, but so many people these days seem to want one to choose.

On the subject of photos: I could crop them to the right size before sending them, but you'd have to first identify the subject, so it would probably all take just as long.  ;)

An amateur and a complete novice in mediterranean stuff, attempting to establish a garden in Andros, Cyclades, Greece. We're about 45m above sea level. Steep learning curve? Vertical straight line.

Joanna Savage

  • Sr. Member
Re: Plant of the Day
« Reply #2 on: May 15, 2015, 04:38:15 PM »
Re.Alisdair's photos on FB. Recently I was googling to find the MGS website to see if there is anything new apart from the Forum. The first result of the search is the full MGS site. Immediately after it came
www.facebook.com/MediterraneanGardenSociety
And there were all the photos and Alisdair's remarks, plus a lot of other stuff.
I did not join FB and , of course, won't be joining in any discussion. I have not given my name or address. But it is excellent to be able to access what Alisdair is producing. I hope the facility lasts.
I write as a tech novice but perhaps others will be able to see the photos too. Thanks Alisdair for all the work and time.

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Alisdair

  • Global Moderator
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Re: Plant of the Day
« Reply #3 on: May 15, 2015, 05:38:52 PM »
Thanks, Joanna, very much appreciated!
Alisdair Aird
Gardens in SE England (Sussex); also coastal Southern Greece, and (in a very small way) South West France; MGS member (and former president); vice chairman RHS Lily Group, past chairman Cyclamen Society

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John J

  • Hero Member
Cistanche phelypaea
« Reply #4 on: May 16, 2015, 05:28:29 AM »
Having tentatively begun the posting of photos on this thread can I continue with an unusual broomrape.
Alisdair recently posted a photo on the MGS Facebook page taken on this year's Morocco trip. I wasn't on that one but I was on the one last year and as we drove along the highway bordering Agadir airport the leader spotted this parasitic plant growing in the central reservation. The 2 minibuses parked and the local population were probably astonished to witness a group of, obviously demented, foreigners crossing 2 lanes of traffic to examine and photograph what to them was probably a common weed. The plant in question is Cistanche phelypaea.
« Last Edit: July 19, 2015, 09:54:18 AM by Alisdair »
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

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John J

  • Hero Member
Polygala balansae
« Reply #5 on: May 17, 2015, 04:22:01 AM »
Another wildflower from last year's Morocco trip, Polygala balansae.
« Last Edit: July 19, 2015, 09:54:32 AM by Alisdair »
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

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John J

  • Hero Member
Waterfalls of Ouzoud in Morocco
« Reply #6 on: May 17, 2015, 07:14:36 PM »
My preconceived ideas about Morocco being a dry, dusty place took a distinct knock when we were taken to the waterfalls at Ouzoud.
« Last Edit: July 19, 2015, 09:55:27 AM by Alisdair »
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

Hilary

  • Hero Member
Re: Plant of the Day
« Reply #7 on: May 18, 2015, 07:04:45 AM »
i doubt if we will be going to Morocco but I have the book, just in case.
The waterfalls are listed under Cascades d'Ouzound.

Looking forward to seeing more photos  from Morocco
MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

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John J

  • Hero Member
Garden irrigated with grey water
« Reply #8 on: May 26, 2015, 05:24:18 AM »
Have returned from the MGS trip to Epirus in northern Greece. While I sort out the couple of hundred or so photos I took here is a shot of the private garden accessed from our bathroom in the Riad Dar al Hossoun in Taroudant, Morocco. The water from the shower ran down to a small hole at the base of the window and out into the garden. Also the drain pipe from the hand basins carried the water outside for the plants.
« Last Edit: July 19, 2015, 09:56:41 AM by Alisdair »
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

Hilary

  • Hero Member
Re: Plant of the Day
« Reply #9 on: May 26, 2015, 09:55:15 AM »
Interesting.
I am always worried about the soapy water, from balconies and cars being washed, getting  into the beds where there are some trees here in the yard of the building.
So far nothing has keeled over and died, in fact a self sown apricot tree is very healthy
MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

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John J

  • Hero Member
Narcissus poeticus
« Reply #10 on: May 27, 2015, 08:02:07 AM »
From Morocco to Greece. Members of the MGS trip to the Epirus region of northern Greece on the first day in an area full of Narcissus poeticus. Just a pity that technology has not yet discovered how to transmit scent as well as vision!
« Last Edit: July 19, 2015, 09:56:56 AM by Alisdair »
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

royscot

  • Newbie
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Re: Plant of the Day
« Reply #11 on: May 27, 2015, 10:36:43 PM »
Hi, as a newish member can I come back to Daisy's original post on this subject. She seemed to make a good initial point that all these wonderful plant photos are being put on Facebook (with appropriate comment) almost daily but do not appear on the MGS website (although perhaps some have been put on in the past) for the benefit of its members. It was also mentioned that the forum seemed to be dying a bit. I was a professional garden designer in the UK and having moved to Spain in retirement, am now in the process of developing my own Spanish garden. Although I know a lot about plants which grow well in the UK, I know almost nothing about med plants and the link recently provided to the Facebook page (which I now appreciate I can access without actually going on Facebook) has been a revelation and I am downloading an encyclopedia of plants that I can examine further and decide which ones would be suitable for my garden.

It occurs to me that most new members, like me, initially join because they have moved to a Med climate and want info on their new location and what plants to grow. Perhaps the MGS is not providing enough direct info (and photos) on plants on its website as opposed to Facebook. Perhaps the forum would be more active if this was provided.

Apologies if this is totally offbeam but just my initial thoughts on this subject.

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John J

  • Hero Member
Phlomis fruticosa
« Reply #12 on: May 28, 2015, 06:48:48 AM »
Most of you are probably familiar with Phlomis fruticosa. In certain areas of the mountains of northern Greece they coat the hillsides in a mass of yellow.
« Last Edit: July 19, 2015, 09:57:35 AM by Alisdair »
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

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John J

  • Hero Member
Re: Plant of the Day
« Reply #13 on: May 28, 2015, 07:11:29 AM »
Royscot, thanks for your input. May I ask if you have looked back over previous posts, especially those in the 'Plants for mediterranean gardens' section? I feel that there is a wealth of information contained there regarding plants that are suitable for mediterranean climate gardens, often with photos attached. I realise that there is no fixed template that defines a mediterranean garden due to the vagaries of location, altitude, etc, but that is where the experiences of members who have actually grown the plants in question is so valuable. I also realise that it involves a lot of time and effort to go back over so many posts trying to find ones that are relevant, but doesn't all research do that?
In April of this year a forum member posted, in the Miscellaneous section, 'Starting point for reading material on this forum?'. Perhaps the advice given by other members on that occasion might be of assistance in your own quest. I wish you good hunting and every success with your Spanish garden venture.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

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John J

  • Hero Member
Kalogeriko pack-animal bridge
« Reply #14 on: May 29, 2015, 04:53:28 AM »
One of the many ancient pack-animal bridges we came across on our travels in the mountains of northern Greece.
« Last Edit: July 19, 2015, 09:59:40 AM by Alisdair »
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)