Unsung heroes

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David Dickinson

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Re: Unsung heroes Saxifraga stolonifera
« Reply #15 on: May 25, 2020, 01:09:42 AM »
Saxifraga  stolonifera deserves to be recognised as an unsung hero, I think, not only putting up without water but without much light too. Just starting to flower for me now.
I have a small garden in Rome, Italy. Some open soil, some concrete, some paved. Temperatures in winter occasionally down to 0C. Summer temperatures up to 40C in the shade. There are never watering restrictions but, of course, there is little natural water for much of June, July and August.

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Fermi

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Re: Unsung heroes
« Reply #16 on: October 11, 2021, 02:59:13 AM »
These "Stocks" came from a friend who calls them "Brompton Stocks" - perhaps someone here might know why? They last a few years but always set a few seedlings to replace themselves - fortunately they can be moved while young to where we prefer them to be growing!
They go well with Cerinthe major 'Purpurascens' in one of our garden beds,
cheers
fermi
Mr F de Sousa, Central Victoria, Australia
member of AGS, SRGC, NARGS
working as a physio to support my gardening habit!

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Fermi

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Re: Unsung heroes
« Reply #17 on: October 14, 2021, 03:26:19 AM »
I'm not sure why we only have two types of Arctotitis in our garden - perhaps because they are often used for council plantings and industrial sites! Definitely an unsung hero and unlike their fellow South Africans, gazanias, they don't seem to self seed around the place,
cheers
fermi
Mr F de Sousa, Central Victoria, Australia
member of AGS, SRGC, NARGS
working as a physio to support my gardening habit!

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Charithea

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Re: Unsung heroes
« Reply #18 on: October 14, 2021, 11:58:24 AM »
Fermi, I love the combination of "Stocks" and "Cerinthe", also the dark "Arctotitis" . The yellow....?
I garden in Cyprus, in a flat old farming field, alt. approx. 30 m asl.

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Charithea

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Re: Unsung heroes
« Reply #19 on: October 20, 2021, 05:05:09 PM »
I was searching for some information when my eyes fell one of Fermi's postings back in January 2016.  It was about Perovskia atriplicifolia (Salvia yiangii) and it said how well they did in his garden.  Well today on a plant trip I saw in the garden growing out of very dry looking corner an enormous Perovskia.  I thought it was a sign for me to search for them.  I asked the young girl and she pointed me to an area full of them .  I bought three. She also said that they are tough.  I did not tell her that mine are still struggling to establish and that I had many failure before.  So here is a photo of them and some of the other plants that we bought.  Teucrium chamaedrys and Muhlenbergia capillaries.
« Last Edit: October 20, 2021, 08:16:41 PM by Charithea »
I garden in Cyprus, in a flat old farming field, alt. approx. 30 m asl.