Salvia farinacea Victoria

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Daisy

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Salvia farinacea Victoria
« on: September 14, 2014, 07:17:08 AM »
I grew a few of these from seed this year. I had to put them in a pot as I had no space in the garden. They have bloomed all summer there, but now, I need the pot for some spring flowering bulbs. I have made some space in the garden now and would like to split them and plant out. Are they worth it?
I have only ever grown them as an annual. Do they work well as a perennial, or do they not perform well in subsequent years?
Thanks, Daisy :)
Amateur gardener, who has gardened in Surrey and Cornwall, England, but now has a tiny garden facing north west, near the coast in north east Crete. It is 300 meters above sea level. On a steep learning curve!!! Member of both MGS and RHS

David Dickinson

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Re: Salvia farinacea Victoria
« Reply #1 on: September 14, 2014, 10:09:37 AM »
Hi Daisy. I have had a Salvia farinacea in the same pot for over 4 years and it gives a lot of flowers from late spring to autumn. Admittedly a little less energetic this year. Maybe because of our wetter, cooler summer or maybe it is getting old. I don't know which variety it is.

I too grew "Victoria" from seed this year expecting the flower stems to be much more purple than they actually are but I was a little disappointed as they are only marginally more purple than the one I mentioned above. I have just bought some seeds of "Evolution" which, hopefully, should be better. I ordered them from Jungle Seeds UK.

On the subject of being disappointed with salvia flowers I grew Salvia roemeriana"Hot Trumpets" from seed this year and the flowers never really opened but self pollinated while closed. I have some seed but I don't know if I will bother to grow any more. Let's see if the plants I have from this year produce better flowers next year.
I have a small garden in Rome, Italy. Some open soil, some concrete, some paved. Temperatures in winter occasionally down to 0C. Summer temperatures up to 40C in the shade. There are never watering restrictions but, of course, there is little natural water for much of June, July and August.

Daisy

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Re: Salvia farinacea Victoria
« Reply #2 on: September 19, 2014, 07:06:05 AM »
Thanks David. I will plant them out in the garden soon. They flower for such a long time, it is definitely worth trying.
Daisy :)
Amateur gardener, who has gardened in Surrey and Cornwall, England, but now has a tiny garden facing north west, near the coast in north east Crete. It is 300 meters above sea level. On a steep learning curve!!! Member of both MGS and RHS