Campsis radicans

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John

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Campsis radicans
« on: July 13, 2011, 11:26:49 PM »
Most people will know this woody climber from the south eastern USA. Well known in the Med. it is not an unusual plant in the UK where it is quite hardy though benefits from the protection and warmth of a wall which also helps to ripen the wood.
John
Horticulturist, photographer, author, garden designer and plant breeder; MGS member and RHS committee member. I garden at home in SW London and also at work in South London.

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Alisdair

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Re: Campsis radicans
« Reply #1 on: July 14, 2011, 08:07:21 AM »
In mediterranean conditions Campsis radicans can be a bit too successful for smaller gardens. It's a very strong grower, and its roots can produce an extensive tangle of further suckering shoots. Giving a very similar effect, the other species Campsis grandiflora is a bit better behaved; another choice for smaller gardens is C. x tagliabuana, much less aggressive, with pink flowers.

Alisdair Aird
Gardens in SE England (Sussex); also coastal Southern Greece, and (in a very small way) South West France; MGS member (and former president); vice chairman RHS Lily Group, past chairman Cyclamen Society

David Bracey

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Re: Campsis radicans
« Reply #2 on: July 17, 2011, 02:41:52 PM »
I would only grow the showy C. grandiflora in the med; you can leave C. radicans for the Northern climes.

Both flower on new wood ie wood of the current year.  I would cut back last year`s wood to say 1 or 2 buds or back to the old wood and shape the climber at the same time. They both respond well to strong pruning and both make excellent shade species in the summer.

The yellow type C radicans "Flava" is also worth growing.

David
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 I have gardened in sub-tropical Florida, maritime UK, continental Europe and the Mediterranean basin, France. Of the 4 I have found that the most difficult climate for gardening is the latter.

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Alisdair

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Re: Campsis radicans
« Reply #3 on: July 17, 2011, 07:13:05 PM »
Good point, David (I rather prefer C. radicans 'Flava' myself, as its flowers make a better contrast with the deep green leaves).
Alisdair Aird
Gardens in SE England (Sussex); also coastal Southern Greece, and (in a very small way) South West France; MGS member (and former president); vice chairman RHS Lily Group, past chairman Cyclamen Society

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JTh

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Re: Campsis radicans
« Reply #4 on: August 05, 2011, 04:29:49 PM »
I bought what I thought was a C. radicans several years ago, hoping that it would grow quickly and covering a fence. I later found  label saying 'Μπιγνόνια' which I then learnt was not a Bignonia, but a C. grandiflora. It has barely survived, is till less than one m tall, has never produced any flowers. At least this year it at least looks healthy, but I wonder what I should do to get the strong growth I was hoping for?
Retired veterinary surgeon by training with a PhD in parasitology,  but worked as a virologist since 1992.
Member of the MGS  since 2004. Gardening in Oslo and to a limited extent in Halkidiki, Greece.

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John

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Re: Campsis radicans
« Reply #5 on: August 05, 2011, 04:33:26 PM »
Move to London!
John
Horticulturist, photographer, author, garden designer and plant breeder; MGS member and RHS committee member. I garden at home in SW London and also at work in South London.

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JTh

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Re: Campsis radicans
« Reply #6 on: August 05, 2011, 08:06:58 PM »
No better solution than that?
Retired veterinary surgeon by training with a PhD in parasitology,  but worked as a virologist since 1992.
Member of the MGS  since 2004. Gardening in Oslo and to a limited extent in Halkidiki, Greece.

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John

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Re: Campsis radicans
« Reply #7 on: August 05, 2011, 08:36:03 PM »
Well OK. It may just be (as in London) that such a climber will grow well but needs to get it's roots down before it will take off. This is certainly true of Wisteria here especially against a house wall where moisture may be a problem. I have seen Wisteria struggle for years and then suddenly go mad.
In the Med it may be that it is too dry especially in a particular spot where maybe the bedrock will not allow the roots to search out any moisture for themselves.
John
Horticulturist, photographer, author, garden designer and plant breeder; MGS member and RHS committee member. I garden at home in SW London and also at work in South London.

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JTh

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Re: Campsis radicans
« Reply #8 on: August 05, 2011, 08:52:55 PM »
I'll just wait for it to find its way through the rocky ground then, it took quite a few years before my oleanders were established as well.
Retired veterinary surgeon by training with a PhD in parasitology,  but worked as a virologist since 1992.
Member of the MGS  since 2004. Gardening in Oslo and to a limited extent in Halkidiki, Greece.

Umbrian

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Re: Campsis radicans
« Reply #9 on: August 06, 2011, 06:13:51 AM »
I think patience is indeed the answer Jorun. I planted two Campsis radicans ,one either end of a pergola that runs along the west side of the house, about 10 years ago. After careful watering the first year they were on their own and made very slow progress but now have reached the top of the pergola and are making their way across to give welcome shade and a profusion of flowers. Hang on in there!
« Last Edit: August 06, 2011, 07:51:18 AM by Alisdair »
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.

Hilary

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Re: Campsis radicans
« Reply #10 on: September 09, 2015, 09:38:35 AM »
My contribution to 'Plant of the day'
Campsis radicans, Trumpet Vine,  does very well here in Corinth.
Most plants are huge and cover the boundary wall or fence of some of the  yards here.
I don't believe they get any watering at all.
They appear to be non invasive as they certainly have the opportunity in some places but do not spread.
Corinth is built on an alluvial plain so their roots have no problem seeking out the underground water.
Ants seem to like  the plant, although  I didn't see the usual army of ants on the plant I snapped in August
Empty building plots in the countryside often have a couple of Trumpet Vines clinging onto the wire fences   in preparation for the time, now disappeared for ever, when little dream houses can be built.
MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

nikthegreek

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Re: Campsis radicans
« Reply #11 on: September 10, 2015, 11:46:48 AM »
Any clues about how to tell C. radicans from grandiflora? I'm confused about which is which. I have one growing in my plot and I don't know which one it is.

Btw, another relative very common in Greece is the orange variety of Tecoma capensis. This one is useful as it provides winter colour when not a lot of plants are blooming plus it provides spring and fall colour somewhat unpredictably. It can be aggresive and expansionist though, given half a chance. Hardy and fully evergreen in southern Greece.

Nik

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John J

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Re: Campsis radicans
« Reply #12 on: September 10, 2015, 02:01:08 PM »
Hi Nik and welcome to the forum. I think the simplest explanation I've seen of the difference between the two is that C grandiflora flowers have a shorter tube than C radicans and the flare of the corolla is wider.
Hope this might be of some help.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

Umbrian

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Re: Campsis radicans
« Reply #13 on: September 10, 2015, 09:17:31 PM »
Warning! This plant can be invasive....it's roots have  travelled underneath a paved 2metre wide path between a sloping planting area and our house and,until I dealt with it, was happily climbing up the wall of the house....no signs of it inside yet but I make regular checks especially since a Passiflora, planted in a similar area, suddenly appeared inside our hallway......
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.

Thurksh

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Re: Campsis radicans
« Reply #14 on: October 18, 2015, 02:14:36 AM »
Take a view to the new hybrids "summer jazz" smaller plants with the same parentage as Mdame. Galen, the yellow form is specially nice.

http://bit.ly/1VYu6hq

http://bit.ly/1VYudK1
« Last Edit: October 18, 2015, 02:17:51 AM by Thurksh »
Just a curious visitor of the forum, interested in every kind of plants.