Apricot grafting

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Alice

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Apricot grafting
« on: June 17, 2014, 07:30:15 AM »
We have an apricot tree which, every other year, produces masses of rather tasteless apricots, all ripening within 10 days. I was wondering if we could graft this tree with another better tasting variety, at the same time extending the harvesting period. Assuming that the original tree is already a graft on some other rootstock, would this exercise produce reasonable results?
Amateur gardener who has gardened in north London and now gardens part of the year on the Cycladic island of Paros. Conditions: coastal, windy, annual rainfall 350mm, temp 0-35 degrees C.

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Alisdair

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Re: Apricot grafting
« Reply #1 on: June 17, 2014, 11:59:06 AM »
Definitely worth trying - Blackmoor Nursery in the UK even sell a tree which combines an apricot, a peach and a nectarine all grafted on to the same root stock.
Alisdair Aird
Gardens in SE England (Sussex); also coastal Southern Greece, and (in a very small way) South West France; MGS member (and former president); vice chairman RHS Lily Group, past chairman Cyclamen Society

Alice

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Re: Apricot grafting
« Reply #2 on: June 18, 2014, 01:12:30 PM »
Thanks, Alisdair.
My concern was that it would be a graft on a graft. Would that make any difference?
Amateur gardener who has gardened in north London and now gardens part of the year on the Cycladic island of Paros. Conditions: coastal, windy, annual rainfall 350mm, temp 0-35 degrees C.

*

Alisdair

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Re: Apricot grafting
« Reply #3 on: June 19, 2014, 07:31:45 AM »
It shouldn't make any difference. It has been done commercially with peach trees in the States, and is quite common in fruit trees from other families, particularly apples. This type of grafting is called "topworking" and as well as "recreational" use (making your own family tree, with several varieties on the same tree) it is used commercially either to reinvigorate a tree that isn't fruiting well, or to replace or add a newer more productive variety, or occasionally to include a pollinator in a self-incompatible tree. If your apricot is of an age where it's already got stout bark, you might do better bud grafting in winter than trying cleft grafting.
Alisdair Aird
Gardens in SE England (Sussex); also coastal Southern Greece, and (in a very small way) South West France; MGS member (and former president); vice chairman RHS Lily Group, past chairman Cyclamen Society

Alice

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Re: Apricot grafting
« Reply #4 on: June 19, 2014, 05:34:13 PM »
Many thanks for the information, Alisdair.
I shall try my hand at grafting. Good to know it can be done in winter.
Amateur gardener who has gardened in north London and now gardens part of the year on the Cycladic island of Paros. Conditions: coastal, windy, annual rainfall 350mm, temp 0-35 degrees C.