Jacobinia pauciflora

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John J

  • Hero Member
Jacobinia pauciflora
« on: February 21, 2018, 01:15:12 PM »
Yesterday I paid a visit to one of my favourite nurseries to see what they had on offer for the new season. One plant that caught my eye was labelled as Jacobinia pauciflora. Being a sucker for plants that I have never grown before I bought one to try out. I can't even blame my wife as she was not with me on this occasion. On looking it up when I got home I found that according to some sources the name on the label is a synonym and the accepted name is Justicia rizzinii. Apparently it comes from Brazil and is known as the Brazilian Fuchsia although it is not even closely related to the fuchsias. Not really knowing much about it I will start it off in a pot and keep it under cover in partial shade while it settles in.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

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JTh

  • Hero Member
Re: Jacobinia pauciflora
« Reply #1 on: February 21, 2018, 06:18:00 PM »
Phytomania is a severe, chronic wasting disease.
Retired veterinary surgeon by training with a PhD in parasitology,  but worked as virologist since 1992.
Member of the MGS and Branch website editor. Gardening in Oslo and to a limited extent in Halkidiki, Greece.

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John J

  • Hero Member
Re: Jacobinia pauciflora
« Reply #2 on: February 21, 2018, 06:44:15 PM »
I take it there is no known cure, Jorun, so I'm doomed?
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

Caroline

  • Full Member
Re: Jacobinia pauciflora
« Reply #3 on: February 21, 2018, 09:55:32 PM »
I suspect it is very common among those who contribute to this Forum...
I am establishing a garden on Waiheke Island, 35 minutes out of Auckland. The site is windy, the clay soil dries out quickly in summer and is like plasticine in winter, but it is still very rewarding. Water is an issue, as we depend on tanks. I'm looking forward to sharing ideas. Caroline

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JTh

  • Hero Member
Re: Jacobinia pauciflora
« Reply #4 on: February 21, 2018, 11:05:13 PM »
I'm afraid there is no cure, John, and yes, it's highly contagious.
Retired veterinary surgeon by training with a PhD in parasitology,  but worked as virologist since 1992.
Member of the MGS and Branch website editor. Gardening in Oslo and to a limited extent in Halkidiki, Greece.

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Alisdair

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Re: Jacobinia pauciflora
« Reply #5 on: February 22, 2018, 09:52:49 AM »
John, my trusted Conservatory and Indoor Plants by Roger Phillips and Martyn Rix (in fact a fine near-encyclopedia of mediterranean-climate plants) says it's "easy to grow and valued for its winter flowering. Min 5 deg C."
Alisdair Aird
Gardens in SE England (Sussex); also coastal Southern Greece, and (in a very small way) South West France; MGS member (and former president); vice chairman RHS Lily Group, past chairman Cyclamen Society

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John J

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Re: Jacobinia pauciflora
« Reply #6 on: February 22, 2018, 05:07:12 PM »
Thanks, Alisdair, good to know. Sounds as though it should do well in a pot on our covered, south-facing, front patio.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

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John J

  • Hero Member
Re: Jacobinia pauciflora
« Reply #7 on: March 12, 2018, 07:59:52 AM »
To add weight to Jorun's diagnosis regarding my suffering from phytomania. The plant below is a variety of Kalanchoe and it would be reasonable to assume that all those little buds should open into a blaze of colour. Not so, what you see is what you get. Has anyone else had any experience of this plant?
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)