Big thanks to Chantal and seed donators

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David Dickinson

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Big thanks to Chantal and seed donators
« on: October 21, 2013, 11:20:05 PM »
Just wanted to post a quick thank you to Chantal and all those who send seed to her for the MGS seedbank. I have several new plants on my balcony this year thanks to you all. Here are a couple of photos of just one of them, Pavonia Missionum. Although still small and only in their first year, the 3 plants that I have raised from MGS seed have all flowered for me. More than can be said for my commercially bought Pavonia Hastata. They have grown but no flowers yet. Next year? It was this latter that set me off wanting to grow Pavonias after I saw an example in the English Garden at the Reggia, Caserta www.reggiadicaserta.beniculturali.it/index.php/royal-palace-guide.html
 
My small balcony produces meagre quantities of seed but I shall be sending some off to the seedbank shortly that I have either collected from my plants or seen growing on plants on visits to parks etc. The more people involved the merrier! :)

Cheers
I have a small garden in Rome, Italy. Some open soil, some concrete, some paved. Temperatures in winter occasionally down to 0C. Summer temperatures up to 40C in the shade. There are never watering restrictions but, of course, there is little natural water for much of June, July and August.

Trevor Australis

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Re: Big thanks to Chantal and seed donators
« Reply #1 on: October 22, 2013, 12:34:54 AM »
No pictures to post but I, too, send my Thanks and congratulations to Chantal for the considerable amount of work she does to conduct our terrific MGS seed exchange. My proud moments have come from successfully raising Acer monspelensis and Phoenix theophrasti. Now won't someone pls send in some seed of the Azarolle?
M Land. Arch., B. Sp. Ed. Teacher, traveller and usually climate compatible.

David Dickinson

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Re: Big thanks to Chantal and seed donators
« Reply #2 on: November 10, 2013, 09:52:38 PM »
One more plant flowering in its first year grown from MGS seeds - Maurandya barclaiana. The flower buds seemed to be about to produce white flowers but they coloured up as they developed to produce these deep violet flowers (photo is bluer than they really are). Thanks again to Chantal and the person who donated the seed  :)
« Last Edit: November 11, 2013, 08:06:45 AM by Alisdair »
I have a small garden in Rome, Italy. Some open soil, some concrete, some paved. Temperatures in winter occasionally down to 0C. Summer temperatures up to 40C in the shade. There are never watering restrictions but, of course, there is little natural water for much of June, July and August.

Umbrian

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Re: Big thanks to Chantal and seed donators
« Reply #3 on: November 19, 2013, 10:36:19 PM »
Hi David - am a bit worried that you may not have received my thanks for the seeds that you sent and that arrived safely. Could you verify or not as the case may be?
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.

Hilary

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Re: Big thanks to Chantal and seed donators
« Reply #4 on: February 16, 2020, 06:46:46 AM »
Maurandya barclayana, Angel's trumpet, Mexican viper

This climber grew from seed, obtained from  THE MEDITERRANEAN GARDEN SOCIETY seed exchange, and was a colourful sight growing up one of our many Portulacaria afra plants. I am hoping the seeds I harvested will produce more plants this year.

The photo of darker coloured flowers was taken at Sparoza in October, 2017

Maurandya barclayana is mentioned in THE MEDITERRANEAN GARDEN number 2, Autumn 1996 under its older name of Asarina barclaiana
Read
EASY FLOWERING PLANTS by John Calderwood
where information on how to grow two plants, Maurandya barclayana  and Salvia coccinea, is given
MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care