Harvesting pomegranates

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JTh

  • Hero Member
Re: Harvesting pomegranates
« Reply #15 on: August 19, 2018, 07:28:14 PM »
Do you normally harvest them this early?.

Our pomegranate crop will not be  as good as  the last couple of years, but the pomegranates look very healthy. We probably had a lot more rain than you did.
Retired veterinary surgeon by training with a PhD in parasitology,  but worked as virologist since 1992.
Member of the MGS and Branch website editor. Gardening in Oslo and to a limited extent in Halkidiki, Greece.

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John J

  • Hero Member
Re: Harvesting pomegranates
« Reply #16 on: August 20, 2018, 08:00:19 AM »
Not normally this early, Jorun, but with the 2 year drought we've been suffering the overall food supply for our feathered friends has been severely reduced, so they are taking more than their normal share. We had to get in while there were still a few left for us.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

Daisy

  • Sr. Member
Re: Harvesting pomegranates
« Reply #17 on: August 23, 2018, 10:27:25 AM »
The rats have eaten ALL of my pomegranates this year.
Daisy
Amateur gardener, who has gardened in Surrey and Cornwall, England, but now has a tiny garden facing north west, near the coast in north east Crete. It is 300 meters above sea level. On a steep learning curve!!! Member of both MGS and RHS

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Charithea

  • Sr. Member
Re: Harvesting pomegranates
« Reply #18 on: November 25, 2018, 04:10:48 PM »
We planted 3 pomegranate trees, of the new variety, a few years ago. ( the trees came free) The middle tree produced one fruit. Luckily the birds have not eaten it. 
I garden in Cyprus, in a flat old farming field, alt. approx. 30 m asl.

Caroline

  • Full Member
Re: Harvesting pomegranates
« Reply #19 on: November 25, 2018, 08:13:17 PM »
Does anyone know about how long before a Pomegranate usually starts to flower/fruit? I have a very healthy little tree on the back lawn which I am scanning for the first sign of a flower (remembering that we are now late spring here).  I was given it about five years ago and it is now about 80cm tall.  I planted it to remind me of one in my mother's old garden, which was probably 90-odd years old, and which every spring would be covered with those waxy scarlet flowers, and glowing red fruit in autumn. 
I am establishing a garden on Waiheke Island, 35 minutes out of Auckland. The site is windy, the clay soil dries out quickly in summer and is like plasticine in winter, but it is still very rewarding. Water is an issue, as we depend on tanks. I'm looking forward to sharing ideas. Caroline

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JTh

  • Hero Member
Re: Harvesting pomegranates
« Reply #20 on: November 25, 2018, 11:58:26 PM »
I read that it usually takes 4-6 years before they start bearing fruit, but that they can get 200 years old, see some more info here: https://homeguides.sfgate.com/long-pomegranate-tree-grow-61116.html . My two pomegranates took longer, though,  our soil is not very good, but they now give us plenty of fruit now, although not every year. This year was not a bad one.  I got 6 kg pure pomegranate juice out of these, and my fingers and nails were dark brown for weeks afterwards.


PA091512.jpg Punica granatum
by Jorun Tharaldsen, on Flickr


IMG_20181010_180240.jpg Pome granate jelly
by Jorun Tharaldsen, on Flickr

Retired veterinary surgeon by training with a PhD in parasitology,  but worked as virologist since 1992.
Member of the MGS and Branch website editor. Gardening in Oslo and to a limited extent in Halkidiki, Greece.

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Charithea

  • Sr. Member
Re: Harvesting pomegranates
« Reply #21 on: November 26, 2018, 05:49:49 AM »
Jorun, what are you going to do with all this jelly?  Our neighbor has started farming pomegranates a few years ago and he sells to the market.  I bought some to make jelly but we have been eating them instead. I will ask him the name of the variety and how long it took for them to fruit.
I garden in Cyprus, in a flat old farming field, alt. approx. 30 m asl.

Umbrian

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Re: Harvesting pomegranates
« Reply #22 on: November 26, 2018, 07:52:52 AM »
My Pomegranate tree, planted four years ago when probably about three/four years old, produces many flowers but sadly, so far,  the most fruit it has set is three. That was this year when one matured into a large fruit whilst the other two remained very small. Fortunately the birds do not seem interested in them, either don't notice them or are too content gorging themselves on the abundant Kaki fruit nearby.
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.

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Charithea

  • Sr. Member
Re: Harvesting pomegranates
« Reply #23 on: November 26, 2018, 12:42:59 PM »
Here I am again with the information promised regarding names and time needed to produce fruit.  I asked our  neighbour and one of the variety is called Wonderful.  It took only two years to produce. The fruit is juicy but has big pips. He gave me a pomegranate to try this morning. Variety name unknown for now but it took 3 years to produce fruit. It is his favourite  pomegranate and I think he is correct in his choice. The fruit is very juicy and has tiny pips.  They planted the cuttings in the ground in the winter because it is cooler and in the hope  of rainy days. I also like to say that our pomegranates seeds  do not pop out when you hit the fruit with the back of the spoon.  They are embedded in so well they have to be cut open with a knife. We get very badly stained fingers. No rubber gloves .
I garden in Cyprus, in a flat old farming field, alt. approx. 30 m asl.