Thunbergia

  • 7 Replies
  • 4124 Views
*

John J

  • Hero Member
Thunbergia
« on: September 16, 2013, 09:43:28 AM »
The first flower on my wife's newly-acquired Thunbergia. Thanks again, Yiannos. The plant is actually still in the container while we wait for one of our neighbours to make a frame for it to climb over.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

*

John J

  • Hero Member
Thunbergia alata
« Reply #1 on: October 20, 2013, 10:01:34 AM »
Our 'Black-eyed Susan' is starting to reawaken as the night-time temperatures begin to fall a little.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

Re: Thunbergia
« Reply #2 on: November 01, 2013, 05:50:54 PM »
Hi! I need help with identification.  Is it grandiflora or laurifolia.  2 pictures of my vine trained to climb the porch roof.  Any tips on how to get it to flower profusely?  Sometimes the flowers are sparse, sometimes profuse.  I can't work it out what makes this plant ticks. 

*

Alisdair

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
Re: Thunbergia
« Reply #3 on: November 01, 2013, 07:02:46 PM »
It looks like Thunbergia laurifolia to me, perhaps the form with pointed side lobes at the base of the leaves, which Geoffrey Herklots called "the Singapore form".
Incidentally, Kew's Plant List currently says that Thunbergia grandiflora is a synonym for Thunbergia alata - I suspect that this is a mistake, as the "blue-flowered Bengal clock vine" (T. grandiflora) is so very different from "black-eyed susan" (T. alata).
Alisdair Aird
Gardens in SE England (Sussex); also coastal Southern Greece, and (in a very small way) South West France; MGS member (and current president); vice chairman RHS Lily Group, past chairman Cyclamen Society

Re: Thunbergia
« Reply #4 on: November 02, 2013, 01:31:55 AM »
Thank you Alisdair for the quick response.  For years I thought it is a grandiflora.  I hope members can let me have tips on how to get it to flower profusely.  I fertilise it sometimes and not much happens.  I neglect it and it flowered profusely.  Does it do so when there is a dry spell?  Any tips will be greatly appreciated.

*

Helen B.

  • Newbie
Re: Thunbergia
« Reply #5 on: November 12, 2013, 03:17:32 AM »
I'm not sure about the dry spell, but a lot of things do better with less fertilizer. For instance my variegated Pandorea jasminoides did not bloom but it is in luxuriant growth with too rich a soil. Maybe next year. And my crinums didn't bloom either, surely because I planted annuals in the same pots and then proceeded to fertilize a bit to get more flowers on the petunias/portulas/what have you. Otherwise the little plants start to look tired. I am learning self control slowly!
I garden in pots on a balcony in Austin, Texas. I'm very fond of bulbs, esp. crinums which can take the Texas rains. I also grow flowering vines.

aristoflora

  • Newbie
    • Email
Re: Thunbergia
« Reply #6 on: March 26, 2016, 11:04:14 AM »
Here is another very beutiful Thunbergia, T. erecta, a shrubby and therefore space-saving species  ;D

*

John J

  • Hero Member
Re: Thunbergia
« Reply #7 on: July 21, 2017, 08:40:28 AM »
The first flower on our Thunbergia grandiflora this year.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)