Bupleurum fruticosum

  • 7 Replies
  • 3403 Views

Joanna Savage

  • Sr. Member
Bupleurum fruticosum
« on: August 18, 2013, 04:38:22 PM »
Bupleurum fruticosum is making a cheerful sight in a dessicated August garden at 300m in Toscana. The first photo shows the abundant flowering, I am hoping to germinate seed from it. The second photo shows a younger plant with lavender flowering and white butterflies in the foreground. These butterflies used to be called Cabbage Whites. I wonder if they still are.

This Bupleurum looks as though it might be a good subject for pruning and shaping in the same way as box.

Umbrian

  • Hero Member
    • Email
Re: Bupleurum fruticosum
« Reply #1 on: August 19, 2013, 06:37:20 AM »
A useful shrub providing good foliage and flowers when many things are well past their best. I have read that it tolerates hard pruning (in the spring) making it a useful subject possibly for different positions within the garden.
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.

Joanna Savage

  • Sr. Member
Re: Bupleurum fruticosum
« Reply #2 on: August 19, 2013, 07:29:14 AM »
I forgot to sat that the Bupleurum is growing in a dump of old builder's rubble (with an occasional shoe or razor blade). It receives only natural rainfall.

*

Fleur Pavlidis

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
Re: Bupleurum fruticosum
« Reply #3 on: August 19, 2013, 08:57:00 AM »
This grows well at Sparoza but my only attempt at taking cuttings wasn't very successful. I had just one rooted cutting to pot on which has now been destroyed by rampant hedgehogs in my nursery (along with lots of other precious plants). And to think I had a hedgehog box made to help them hibernate in my garden - totally ignored of course.
MGS member, Greece. I garden in Attica, Greece and Mt Goulinas (450m) Central Greece

*

jmw

  • Newbie
    • Email
Re: Bupleurum fruticosum
« Reply #4 on: August 19, 2013, 09:51:17 AM »
Definitely easy to germinate the seed. Looking forward to my plants flowering!
Jo Wakelin
Gardens in Central Otago, New Zealand, with  -12C to  37C, and 250 - 400mm annual rainfall. Mad keen on cold hardy, drought tolerant plants.Member RHS, lecturer Horticulture.

Alice

  • Hero Member
Re: Bupleurum fruticosum
« Reply #5 on: September 01, 2013, 07:15:11 PM »
I have wanted this plant for many years, as it is considered tough, but have found it difficult to get it to germinate. The one plant that grew died in its first summer. I wonder if seed has to be fresh?
Amateur gardener who has gardened in north London and now gardens part of the year on the Cycladic island of Paros. Conditions: coastal, windy, annual rainfall 350mm, temp 0-35 degrees C.

*

jmw

  • Newbie
    • Email
Re: Bupleurum fruticosum
« Reply #6 on: September 02, 2013, 10:37:52 AM »
My seed was 6 months old when sown, and I germinated my tray outside in late spring conditions rather than on a heat bed.
Jo Wakelin
Gardens in Central Otago, New Zealand, with  -12C to  37C, and 250 - 400mm annual rainfall. Mad keen on cold hardy, drought tolerant plants.Member RHS, lecturer Horticulture.

Alice

  • Hero Member
Re: Bupleurum fruticosum
« Reply #7 on: September 02, 2013, 11:20:44 AM »
Thanks, JMW. I will bear that in mind.
Amateur gardener who has gardened in north London and now gardens part of the year on the Cycladic island of Paros. Conditions: coastal, windy, annual rainfall 350mm, temp 0-35 degrees C.