What would you do?

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Jamus

  • Jr. Member
What would you do?
« on: July 23, 2013, 02:47:10 AM »

I ordered some tomato seed from a mail order company recently and they arrived yesterday in a regular envelope. The trouble is the postie shoved a bundle of mail and junkmail into our letter box and subsequently the whole lot got wet with the rain we're having. I immediately opened the tomato seed envelope and checked the packets. A couple of them were wet and on opening the packets I found that the seed were loose in the paper seed packets and were just slightly damp. I dried the whole lot out in a warm room but now I'm worried that the seeds that got wet will have begun germination and will now die. They all look ok... My first thought was to sow the seed immediately and get them growing but unfortunately we have a good month of winter ahead of us and I wouldn't normally start tomatoes this early. What to do, what to do... what would you do?
Long hot summers, mild wet winters. Rainfall approx. 600mm pa.
Summer maximums over 40 degrees, winter minimums occasionally below freezing.
Gardening on neutral clay loam and sandy loam.

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Alisdair

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
Re: What would you do?
« Reply #1 on: July 23, 2013, 07:57:28 AM »
Jamus, I'd be tempted to hope the seeds are OK, keep your fingers crossed, and sow at your usual time. Tomatoes germinate so quickly that if it turns out that the seeds did fail you'd find out in time to re-order.
Alisdair Aird
Gardens in SE England (Sussex); also coastal Southern Greece, and (in a very small way) South West France; MGS member (and former president); vice chairman RHS Lily Group, past chairman Cyclamen Society

Jamus

  • Jr. Member
Re: What would you do?
« Reply #2 on: July 23, 2013, 10:59:09 PM »
That's what I'll do... thanks Alisdair, you just helped me make up my mind.
Long hot summers, mild wet winters. Rainfall approx. 600mm pa.
Summer maximums over 40 degrees, winter minimums occasionally below freezing.
Gardening on neutral clay loam and sandy loam.