Old, new photos

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Daisy

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Old, new photos
« on: June 18, 2013, 11:22:41 AM »
I took a few photos just before I went to England at the end of May.
I didn't get a chance to share them then, so here are a few now.


april-may 2013 044 by Daisyincrete, on Flickr


april-may 2013 042 by Daisyincrete, on Flickr


april-may 2013 039 by Daisyincrete, on Flickr

Rose Perdita



april-may 2013 050 by Daisyincrete, on Flickr


april-may 2013 020 by Daisyincrete, on Flickr


april-may 2013 009 by Daisyincrete, on Flickr


april 2013 142 by Daisyincrete, on Flickr


april 2013 139 by Daisyincrete, on Flickr

Rose Sombrieul


april 2013 108 by Daisyincrete, on Flickr


april 2013 124 by Daisyincrete, on Flickr


april 2013 125 by Daisyincrete, on Flickr


april 2013 059 by Daisyincrete, on Flickr

Rose Munstead Wood


april 2013 064 by Daisyincrete, on Flickr


april-may 2013 027 by Daisyincrete, on Flickr


april-may 2013 033 by Daisyincrete, on Flickr

Things have changed a great deal whilst I have been away.
I will have to take a few more up to date photos soon.
Daisy :)
Amateur gardener, who has gardened in Surrey and Cornwall, England, but now has a tiny garden facing north west, near the coast in north east Crete. It is 300 meters above sea level. On a steep learning curve!!! Member of both MGS and RHS

Alice

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Re: Old, new photos
« Reply #1 on: June 18, 2013, 06:10:37 PM »
You have surpassed yourself, Daisy.
Earthly paradise!
Amateur gardener who has gardened in north London and now gardens part of the year on the Cycladic island of Paros. Conditions: coastal, windy, annual rainfall 350mm, temp 0-35 degrees C.

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KatG

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Re: Old, new photos
« Reply #2 on: June 19, 2013, 06:37:24 AM »
Lovely. I particularly like the pool planting - beautiful colours.
Katerina Georgi. Interior designer and Garden designer. Has lived, worked and gardened in the southern Peloponnese for the last 26 years. MGS member and head of MGS Peloponnese Branch.

pamela

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Re: Old, new photos
« Reply #3 on: July 24, 2013, 07:39:20 AM »
Hello Daisy
Its always very interesting to look around your lovely garden especially the roses.  How do you manage it?  It appears you have some hybrid tea roses...something I cannot grow.  But I do have some success with ramblers and species roses. I planted Rosa  brunonii ‘La Mortola’ February last year and it gave a wonderful display in May.  R. sempervirens ’Felicite et Perpetue’ is successful as well. It is covered in blooms but again only in early summer.
« Last Edit: July 24, 2013, 06:48:57 PM by Alisdair »
Jávea, Costa Blanca, Spain
Min temp 5c max temp 38c  Rainfall 550 mm 

"Who passes by sees the leaves;
 Who asks, sees the roots."
     - Charcoal Seller, Madagascar

Daisy

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Re: Old, new photos
« Reply #4 on: July 25, 2013, 01:32:07 PM »
Thank-you all.
Pamela, I only have one hybrid tea rose. I don't know it's name as I bought it from a local garden centre.
I have planted it in a pot on the village road at the front of the house.


may 2013 147 by Daisyincrete, on Flickr



april-may 2013 029 by Daisyincrete, on Flickr

It has a really good perfume. I am useless at describing perfumes, so I asked my husband what he thought it smelt like.
He sad it smelt like the attar of roses that his elderly aunt used to wear. He said that he and his brother used to call it atishoo of roses, as his aunt used it so heavily, it made them sneeze. ::)

I would love to see photos of your La Mortola and Felicite and Perpetua, if you have some. I miss some of the once flowering roses, but in such a tiny garden, I am grateful for the repeat my roses give me.
Daisy :)

« Last Edit: July 25, 2013, 01:36:36 PM by Daisy »
Amateur gardener, who has gardened in Surrey and Cornwall, England, but now has a tiny garden facing north west, near the coast in north east Crete. It is 300 meters above sea level. On a steep learning curve!!! Member of both MGS and RHS

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Marilyn

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Re: Old, new photos
« Reply #5 on: July 30, 2013, 07:44:42 PM »
Goodness me, what a heavenly show! As others, I find myself wondering how you do it! The soil looks good, and the tiling must keep roots cool... I do wonder though (and I am sure you have answered this elsewhere) how much do you water?

And please do tell, what is that adorable blue pea flower in the third photo?

:)
I work in hotel and private gardens, promoting sustainable landscape management in the mediterranean climate through the use of diverse, beautiful and appropriate plants. At home, I garden on two balconies containing mostly succulents.

Daisy

  • Sr. Member
Re: Old, new photos
« Reply #6 on: July 31, 2013, 07:52:38 AM »
Marilyn, The blue pea flower, is an annual sweet pea with a really strong perfume. Lathyrus odorata Cupani or Matucana. I sowed the seeds in situ last October/November.
They started flowering in February and continued until I went to England in the last days of May.
Unfortunately, due to illness, I was away much longer than planned.
The garden did not get watered whilst I was away and when I returned, they were finished.


may 2013 057 - Copy by Daisyincrete, on Flickr

The whole garden gets hand watered once a fortnight.
I think it is because I am greedy ::) and plant everything close together, that the soil remains moist.
Daisy :)


Amateur gardener, who has gardened in Surrey and Cornwall, England, but now has a tiny garden facing north west, near the coast in north east Crete. It is 300 meters above sea level. On a steep learning curve!!! Member of both MGS and RHS

Umbrian

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Re: Old, new photos
« Reply #7 on: August 03, 2013, 06:10:46 AM »
Picking up on your remark that "the tiling must keep the roots cool" I have found that plants near to terraces and patios can benefit in two ways. Yes, in the hot months the roots are kept cooler and obviously more moist whereas in the winter the roots of more tender subjects are protected when temperatures fall below their normal tolerance levels. In my garden Plumbago is a good example of this. In more open ground it does not survive well but one I have in a cut out area between the house and front terrace flourishes.
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.

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Marilyn

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Re: Old, new photos
« Reply #8 on: August 10, 2013, 11:49:30 AM »
Hi Daisy, thanks for the reply (and apologies for the delay in responding!)

I think it's amazing what you have achieved; once a fortnight is quite restrained and all the factors (close plantings, good plant choices, hard landscaping etc) are clearly working together well.

Umbrian, yes I think you are right about the benefit of protection in the winter, as well as summer cooling and moisture retention. I have seen cases of this sort too.

:)
I work in hotel and private gardens, promoting sustainable landscape management in the mediterranean climate through the use of diverse, beautiful and appropriate plants. At home, I garden on two balconies containing mostly succulents.

Daisy

  • Sr. Member
Re: Old, new photos and now
« Reply #9 on: August 10, 2013, 12:34:59 PM »
Thanks Marilyn. There is a big difference between my garden at the end of May and now.
It is too hot to do anything except sit and read a book in the shade. That means that my August garden is very messy.
Everything needs deadheading or cutting back. Lots of plants are sprawling over the edges of the paths and some things are looking a bit stressed.
Now that I am old. I have to wear reading glasses.  These glasses make everything that is at a distance slightly blurred.
When I look up from my book, the garden looks like an impressionistic painting. I don't see the mess. I call this my "Monet" garden. ::) ::) ::)
It is the best way to view the garden at this time of year.
I took a few photos this morning. If you squint, you will see what I mean.


021 by Daisyincrete, on Flickr


022 by Daisyincrete, on Flickr


025 by Daisyincrete, on Flickr


028 by Daisyincrete, on Flickr


029 by Daisyincrete, on Flickr


034 by Daisyincrete, on Flickr


037 by Daisyincrete, on Flickr


038 by Daisyincrete, on Flickr


007 by Daisyincrete, on Flickr


005 by Daisyincrete, on Flickr


004 by Daisyincrete, on Flickr

Daisy :)
Amateur gardener, who has gardened in Surrey and Cornwall, England, but now has a tiny garden facing north west, near the coast in north east Crete. It is 300 meters above sea level. On a steep learning curve!!! Member of both MGS and RHS

Umbrian

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Re: Old, new photos
« Reply #10 on: August 11, 2013, 07:03:42 AM »
I was quite relieved to read your post and see the 'photos of your garden in August Daisy - still quite beautiful but looking more like a Mediterranean garden in midsummer :) I love your description of it too, a "Monet" garden...there are always compensations for ever increasing age although missed weeds, that suddenly burgeon and draw the attention of visitors, are not one of them ::) The presence of good foliage plants e.g. Phormium, and well trimmed hedges help to hold the garden together as your photos illustrate, flowers always being more transitory especially during the height of summer and we should appreciate the time we can spend sitting back and relaxing before the autumn clean up begins.
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.