New Plants

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Daisy

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New Plants
« on: January 23, 2014, 02:02:35 PM »
I have been putting in some new plants.
All of them are new to me. I have not grown any of these before.
If anybody has any experience with any of them, I would be glad to hear about them.
Anything you may know, will be helpful.
They are;
Agastache Summer Sunset
Bouvardia ternifolia
Choiysa White Dazzler
Diacsia personata
Hemerocallis Primal Scream
Hemerocallis Summer Wine
Knifophia Mango Popsicle
Sphaeralcea Childerley
Ratibida pinnata
Geum Firestorm
Muhlenbergia capillaris
Strobilanthes dyeriana

Thank-you.
Daisy
Amateur gardener, who has gardened in Surrey and Cornwall, England, but now has a tiny garden facing north west, near the coast in north east Crete. It is 300 meters above sea level. On a steep learning curve!!! Member of both MGS and RHS

Umbrian

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Re: New Plants
« Reply #1 on: January 26, 2014, 02:04:05 PM »
Re your query about your new plantings Daisy, I bought an Agastache last year but cannot remember exactly which one and my notes about purchases made on that particular day have gone astray in the move to our new house. However I can report that I was very pleased with it as it flowered all summer long and when I finally trimmed it back it sent up new flowering spikes quite rapidly, probably due to a prolonged, mild autumn. I have to add that it was in a pot, ready to bring here, and therefore received regular watering. However I am sure that with your very successful watering schedule it will flourish for you too.  :)
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.

Daisy

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Re: New Plants
« Reply #2 on: January 27, 2014, 12:19:52 PM »
Thank-you for telling me about your agastache Umbrian.
Any information is useful.
I am glad to hear that it is long flowering, I need that in such a tiny garden.

So you have completed your move now.
I hope it all went smoothly.
Don't forget, we want some "before" photos.
Daisy :)
Amateur gardener, who has gardened in Surrey and Cornwall, England, but now has a tiny garden facing north west, near the coast in north east Crete. It is 300 meters above sea level. On a steep learning curve!!! Member of both MGS and RHS

David Dickinson

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Re: New Plants
« Reply #3 on: January 27, 2014, 03:18:15 PM »
I grow agastache in pots and they flower for most of the summer. However, I have little luck keeping them over the winter. They don't produce a lot of seed but usually enough to give me a few new plants each year. I grow Agastache aurantica and Agastache "Royal Jubilee". The latter doesn't give me flowers of any great size but it is worth growing just for the scent of the leaves alone. Last year I had Agastache "Black Adder". It does not seem to have survived but I have some seed, Even if it doesn't come true it might give me some blue flowered Agastache.

My attempts at growing Geums have been decidedly less successful. I have seedlings growing from an autumn sowing of Geum Borsii, Geum rivale and Geum rivale "Lemon Drops" but I don't hold out much hope for them.

I have tried with Geum borsii before, both with plants brought over from my sister's garden in the UK and bought from a local supplier. The local supplier is a regular visitor to the UK and brigs back plants to try out here. He has been successful with Geum borsii but his nursery is up in the hills outside Rome with slightly cooler temperatures. Water really wouldn't be a factor in my case nor, I imagine, his. No natural rain water but an abundance of tap water throughout the summer.

I grow Sphaeralcea munroana  successfully in a pot and it has flowers throughout late summer and autumn. Mine is a little more pink than orange. Looking at photos of your Sphaeralcea childerley, perhaps it be a reasonable substitute for Geum borsii colourwise?

Yes, Umbrian do let us have some before, during and after pictures! And similarly let us know Daisy how you get on with your new plants. Best of luck to both of you from a cold, wet and miserable Rome!
I have a small garden in Rome, Italy. Some open soil, some concrete, some paved. Temperatures in winter occasionally down to 0C. Summer temperatures up to 40C in the shade. There are never watering restrictions but, of course, there is little natural water for much of June, July and August.

Umbrian

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Re: New Plants
« Reply #4 on: January 28, 2014, 06:17:40 PM »
Will do as soon as possible....I had an iPad for Christmas and have not worked out how to adapt 'photos for posting yet...it is a steep learning curve in any case and I remember it took me a long time to crack it on my old lap top - am just not very IT minded.
I can report that I put in a lot of well rotted horse manure in the autumn because although the soil is lovely and friable I thought it might be a little "spent" having been used as an "orto" (vegetable garden) for the most part in previous years. I was rewarded with a fine crop of grass, chickweed, groundsel etc but have eradicated most of that now as we are experiencing a mild and not too wet winter here.
The bulbs I planted in the autumn are coming up well and two roses obtained from the UK bare rooted are shooting out new foliage already. Zephirine Drouhin and Chris ( a yellow, scented climber)
An old established Chimonanthus praecox, well over 15ft tall and in need of a good prune, has been filling,what is virtually a courtyard garden, with it's delicious scent for many weeks. All very exciting and I cannot wait to get some more plants in.
I would love a cutting of the Sphaeralcea munroana at a suitable time David. I grew it in the UK and brought one here but lost it a few years ago - a lovely plant I think especially in pots.
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.

David Dickinson

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Re: New Plants
« Reply #5 on: January 29, 2014, 02:28:01 AM »
okay Umbrian re cuttings. I have sent you an individual email :)

Re Agastache aurantica - with the relatively mild winter there is a lot of new growth about 2 cm high coming through. Let's see what February brings as far as weather is concerned. It snowed the last 2 Februaries :(

Agastache Black Adder looks as if there is no chance of a revival but I haven't given up hope completely.
I have a small garden in Rome, Italy. Some open soil, some concrete, some paved. Temperatures in winter occasionally down to 0C. Summer temperatures up to 40C in the shade. There are never watering restrictions but, of course, there is little natural water for much of June, July and August.

Daisy

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Re: New Plants
« Reply #6 on: January 29, 2014, 02:36:52 PM »
Thanks for telling me about your agastaches David. I hope Black Adder revives for you.
You might do better with your geums, if you stick to the chiloense types. They are from a similar climate, so hopefully, will be happy.

I used to grow Sphaeralcea in England. I can't remember now, whether
it was munroana or ambigua.
I am hoping that Childerley will be similar.

It is great to hear about your new garden Umbrian.
It would be nice to hear what you are planting, as you go along.
Zephirine Drouhin is an old favourite of mine, but I had to look Chris up. It looks a good rose. I like the richness of it's colour.
I remember the scent of Chimonanthus praecox. To have that scent filling a courtyard. Wow. ;D
Daisy :)

 

Amateur gardener, who has gardened in Surrey and Cornwall, England, but now has a tiny garden facing north west, near the coast in north east Crete. It is 300 meters above sea level. On a steep learning curve!!! Member of both MGS and RHS

Umbrian

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Re: New Plants
« Reply #7 on: January 30, 2014, 08:50:43 AM »
Yellow roses are my husband's favourite colour and so I wanted to include one in the new garden. When we first came I bought one from our local market just called "Yellow Rose" - normal in those days but things are changing slowly. It is a climber and has done well, scented and repeat flowering but as this garden is so much smaller I wanted to be sure I bought a named variety that would be worth the space allotted to it. I will report on "Chris" when it is established and has flowered. The plant provided has good roots and multiple stems and already new leaves are appearing. Here's hoping it is a winner :)
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.

Daisy

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Re: New Plants
« Reply #8 on: May 12, 2014, 11:24:53 AM »
Here are the first flowers on my new Knifophia Mango Popsicle.
I can see more buds coming up, but these are the first two.
It looks a little bit lost in the border so far, but I am sure it will bulk up.
Daisy :)









Amateur gardener, who has gardened in Surrey and Cornwall, England, but now has a tiny garden facing north west, near the coast in north east Crete. It is 300 meters above sea level. On a steep learning curve!!! Member of both MGS and RHS

Umbrian

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Re: New Plants
« Reply #9 on: May 13, 2014, 06:28:08 AM »
Gorgeous 'photos as always Daisy. Glad to see the Forking Larkspur is still going strong. In my garden the weeds are burgeoning as never before after a mild, wet winter and they are not so welcome!  In my new garden,that is quite small compared to the other, I know I am putting too many plants in but cannot resist the temptation - there are so many "must haves"! Am working on the premise that it will keep the weeds out as there will be no where for them to grow :)
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.