Coreopsis

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John J

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Coreopsis
« on: May 06, 2013, 02:27:32 PM »
Earlier this year I came across Coreopsis plants on sale in a local 'garden centre' and thought I'd give them a try. Their first flowers opened during the week. Unfortunately, as is too often the case, there was no information regarding variety so if anyone can shed light on that I'd be grateful.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

Hilary

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Re: Coreopsis
« Reply #1 on: August 31, 2020, 12:26:06 PM »
Coreopsis verticilata

My daughter spent a quiet evening in August this year in the Royal Botanic Garden, Madrid. There werent many flowers, it being the height of the summer, but she did find a few to snap and send me.

Coreopsis is mentioned in several issues of THE MEDITERRANEAN GARDEN. I have chosen REFLECTIONS IN A FIRE GARDEN  by Nancy Swearengen, in number 38, October 2004, for you to read .
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Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

David Dickinson

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Re: Coreopsis
« Reply #2 on: August 31, 2020, 01:38:15 PM »
C. verticilata is the small "feathery" leaved plant that you can just see at the bottom of Hilary's photo overshadowed by the "star" which has placed itself bang-centre. The original plant photo from John in 2013 looks like it could be some form of C grandiflora. Something like C grandiflora 'Sunburst'? At one point this was often seen in nurseries in Rome. In my experience it didn't last long.

Due to the frustration of losing coreopsis, this year I tried with the annual Coreopsis tinctoria 'Mahogany Midget'  and was very pleased with the results. When full heat came it died off but it was with me until the beginning of July. I will be sowing seeds again next year for sure. Let's see if it has self seeded. I would imagine there are other annual species of coreopsis and, if they germinate and perform as well as C tinctoria, they would be well worth a try.
I have a small garden in Rome, Italy. Some open soil, some concrete, some paved. Temperatures in winter occasionally down to 0C. Summer temperatures up to 40C in the shade. There are never watering restrictions but, of course, there is little natural water for much of June, July and August.

David Dickinson

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Re: Coreopsis
« Reply #3 on: August 31, 2020, 01:46:50 PM »
I have a small garden in Rome, Italy. Some open soil, some concrete, some paved. Temperatures in winter occasionally down to 0C. Summer temperatures up to 40C in the shade. There are never watering restrictions but, of course, there is little natural water for much of June, July and August.

Hilary

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Re: Coreopsis
« Reply #4 on: August 31, 2020, 03:58:54 PM »
Thanks for the correction
So what is the yellow flower my daughter snapped ?
MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

David Dickinson

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Re: Coreopsis
« Reply #5 on: August 31, 2020, 09:44:18 PM »
Hi Hilary,

Sorry if what I wrote seemed like a "correction" - certainly not what I intended. :-) The "star" of the photo seems like a yellow rudbeckia or maybe an echinacea. I'll leave that to the experts. I only recognised the coreopsis because it is one of the perennial coreopsis that is regularly for sale here in Rome and I am often tempted. But my experience with coreopsis has been a series of disappointments. The annual C tinctoria was a real "success" in that it flowered beautifully and when it was time for it to go I didn't have to worry about it. Just had to collect some seed heads for next year. A stress-free plant.
I have a small garden in Rome, Italy. Some open soil, some concrete, some paved. Temperatures in winter occasionally down to 0C. Summer temperatures up to 40C in the shade. There are never watering restrictions but, of course, there is little natural water for much of June, July and August.

Hilary

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Re: Coreopsis
« Reply #6 on: September 01, 2020, 07:45:42 AM »
Oh dear
All we have is words
I am glad to be corrected on the names of plants
Although I must tell you that on a school report my English teacher famously wrote wrote
"HILARY DOES NOT LIKE TO BE CRITICISED " or words to that effect

Here is a photo of Coreopsis tinctoria which a friend of mine grew in her garden
The seeds came from a supermarket
MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

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Charithea

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Re: Coreopsis
« Reply #7 on: September 01, 2020, 10:40:36 AM »
What a lovely exchange. It is  such a co incidence that three days ago I requested 6 packets  of seeds, Rudbeckias, Coreopsis, Cosmos atrosanguineus and Echinacea, from my nephew. He is currently living in Glasgow, suitcases  packed for the third time to come to Cyprus hopefully on the 9th September.  My nephew who does not know the difference between a daffodil and a crocus keeps asking me to explain the names of the seeds. It is my fault because I complicated things by asking him,  if possible, to get tubers of the Astro sanguineus.  By the way my teachers' advice has been (still is by my current Italian one) to Check my spelling.
I garden in Cyprus, in a flat old farming field, alt. approx. 30 m asl.