Iris Douglasiana

  • 7 Replies
  • 5272 Views
*

cicerone

  • Newbie
Iris Douglasiana
« on: April 22, 2013, 03:10:31 AM »
My Douglas Irises are growing massive and blooming profusely in our recent hot weather (high 70s being hot for San Francisco). This particular one I never watered past the first 2 months (sep, oct). It didn't flower or even grow much the first year but this time it's dominating. This is the pure native from local stock and not a "PCH" (Pacific Coast Highway) hybrid.

I wonder if this iris is even grown in other parts of the world or is completely California-centric? The only other irises available to me are traditional Bearded Iris and Butterfly (African) Iris. I know there's much more out there.
- Creating a California Native / Mediterranean garden in the San Francisco Fogbelt

Trevor Australis

  • Sr. Member
Re: Iris Douglasiana
« Reply #1 on: April 22, 2013, 06:06:33 AM »
Yes, there are lots of native American irises grown here in Australia - both PCN's and Louisiana species, and there is a very active hybridising scene. There are local Australian members of SIGNA which is the Species Iris Group of North America and they contribute to a strong seed exchange.
M Land. Arch., B. Sp. Ed. Teacher, traveller and usually climate compatible.

*

Alisdair

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
Re: Iris Douglasiana
« Reply #2 on: April 22, 2013, 07:23:42 AM »
Those west coast irises are lovely.
On an MGS trip to California a few years ago I was very excited to find seed of Iris munzii sold at Mendocino Coast Botanic Garden. I brought some back, sowed it and cultivated it very carefully - sadly it all turned out to be Libertia grandiflora!
Alisdair Aird
Gardens in SE England (Sussex); also coastal Southern Greece, and (in a very small way) South West France; MGS member (and former president); vice chairman RHS Lily Group, past chairman Cyclamen Society

Trevor Australis

  • Sr. Member
Re: Iris Douglasiana
« Reply #3 on: April 22, 2013, 09:58:40 AM »
 :)I PROMIS I will save as much as I can next year of all my sp and hybrids and send it to Chantal. Bracey's MUST be able to send some as they closely involved with CA native plant groups. I sent 1000's seed to a friend in Sth Africa and they took off via her daughters nursery. Easy peasy almost anywhere and they have some adaptability to alkaline soils so select the survivors and look after them.
M Land. Arch., B. Sp. Ed. Teacher, traveller and usually climate compatible.

*

Alisdair

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
Re: Iris Douglasiana
« Reply #4 on: April 22, 2013, 11:46:06 AM »
Good stuff, Trevor - We'll all be looking forward to seeing that seed on Chantal's list!
Alisdair Aird
Gardens in SE England (Sussex); also coastal Southern Greece, and (in a very small way) South West France; MGS member (and former president); vice chairman RHS Lily Group, past chairman Cyclamen Society

Jamus

  • Jr. Member
Re: Iris Douglasiana
« Reply #5 on: July 18, 2013, 10:07:53 PM »
I'm looking forward to getting some of these myself. I was offered some plants by my wife's boss but I'm still waiting! How long to flowering from seed? A few years? A couple?
Long hot summers, mild wet winters. Rainfall approx. 600mm pa.
Summer maximums over 40 degrees, winter minimums occasionally below freezing.
Gardening on neutral clay loam and sandy loam.

Trevor Australis

  • Sr. Member
Re: Iris Douglasiana
« Reply #6 on: July 18, 2013, 11:02:08 PM »
I'd say two years from seed but they self sow too so you will soon have volunteers. I'm looking into Scorpiris/ Juno's with succulent roots. I saw a magnificent patch of Iris planifolia at Pat Toolan's garden in the High Barossa last week and am inspired. Her Oncocyclus iris are fantastic but it is too rainy here for those. They are grown in New Mexico, Nevada and California and of course Israel where they are native.
M Land. Arch., B. Sp. Ed. Teacher, traveller and usually climate compatible.

Jamus

  • Jr. Member
Re: Iris Douglasiana
« Reply #7 on: July 18, 2013, 11:43:38 PM »

I've been in communication with Pat Toolan and she sent me some yearbooks of the Aril Iris Society. I'm going to try some of the Onco Irises in pots here. I'm determined to grow Iris acutiloba, whatever it takes.
Long hot summers, mild wet winters. Rainfall approx. 600mm pa.
Summer maximums over 40 degrees, winter minimums occasionally below freezing.
Gardening on neutral clay loam and sandy loam.