Succulent pelargoniums

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Trevor Australis

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Succulent pelargoniums
« on: February 12, 2013, 07:20:09 AM »
Has anyone experience with growing Pelargonium cotyledonis from the island of St Helena? I have raised a few from seed and am now wondering how best to treat them. Should I feed and water them abundantly to push growth to the maximum before autumn dormancy sets in? They seem sturdy and active but I dont want to risk losing them as the seeds are rather expensive - as I recall about $7 each.  tn
« Last Edit: February 16, 2013, 06:16:34 PM by Alisdair »
M Land. Arch., B. Sp. Ed. Teacher, traveller and usually climate compatible.

Trevor Australis

  • Sr. Member
Pelargonium echinatum
« Reply #1 on: February 12, 2013, 07:32:45 AM »
I have grown Pelargonium echinatum for most of my gardening life. I have two forms; the usual white petalled kind with dark red 'spots' often called the Sweet-heart Geranium/ Pelargonium and a bright pink foorm with the same red spots called either 'Miss Stapleton's form' or 'Stapeltonii'. But I know there are other colour forms too, particularly dark re-purple kinds. Has anyone grown these or raised them from seed? tn
M Land. Arch., B. Sp. Ed. Teacher, traveller and usually climate compatible.

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Alisdair

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Re: Pelargonium echinatum
« Reply #2 on: February 12, 2013, 09:34:06 AM »
I haven't, Trevor; I'd be really interested in forum members' experience of growing any of the succulent pelargoniums in mediterranean conditions.
Alisdair Aird
Gardens in SE England (Sussex); also coastal Southern Greece, and (in a very small way) South West France; MGS member (and former president); vice chairman RHS Lily Group, past chairman Cyclamen Society

Trevor Australis

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Re: Pelargonium echinatum
« Reply #3 on: February 12, 2013, 10:41:28 PM »
I grow P. echinatum outdoors in pots for decorative effect tho' it may be too wet in winter for them to survive in my dirt. We also have P. nodosum in the ground. It is a very lax sprawling open sub-shrub so it scrambles through lavenders, cistus and shrubby salvias. I've just acquired a native Australian sp. P. rodneyanum which has tuberous roots and perennial top growth. This will be going out into a very gravelly part of the garden where it will join Calochortus, aeoniums, desert growing bearded irises and Arctostaphyllos. tn
M Land. Arch., B. Sp. Ed. Teacher, traveller and usually climate compatible.

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John

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Re: Pelargonium cotyledonis
« Reply #4 on: February 16, 2013, 04:51:34 PM »
I recall seeing P. cotyledonis somewhere, probably at Kew many years ago but am not sure about culture. I would suggest growing it with less food and haste and growing it fairly hard to produce a more compact and not soft plant which should in the long run produce a better plant.
« Last Edit: February 16, 2013, 06:17:28 PM by Alisdair »
John
Horticulturist, photographer, author, garden designer and plant breeder; MGS member and RHS committee member. I garden at home in SW London and also at work in South London.

Trevor Australis

  • Sr. Member
Re: Succulent pelargoniums
« Reply #5 on: February 17, 2013, 01:29:51 AM »
Alisdair gave me an excellent website which has some discussion on the care etc of P. cotyledonis whch describes things pretty much as expected. My challenge is to get the seedlings through the first growing period and the following winter dormancy. My inclination is to water and feed to push growth somewhat before the plants cease growing. I will try to be cautious but I have found in the past v small succulent seedlings rot during the first dormancy period whereas slightly bigger plants come through well enough.  tn
M Land. Arch., B. Sp. Ed. Teacher, traveller and usually climate compatible.