Erigeron karvinskianus

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Daisy

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Erigeron karvinskianus
« on: January 09, 2013, 01:00:49 PM »
Janet asked me a question about this plant on Roy's "Help for a Newbie" thread.
I thought rather than hi-jack his thread, I would answer it here.
Janet asked if my plant shrivelled up during the summer.
No, not at all. In fact it carries on flowering all summer and autumn and into the winter. I have just been out to look at it and it's offspring.
( Brrr.....It is 5 degrees celsius outside to-day, with a strong northerly breeze. Much better to be sitting here in front of the log fire ::) ::) ::))
It has finished flowering now. Only about 12 blooms in total on it to-day.
It does have it's roots well under the paving and rocks, I expect that helps it in the summer, having a cool, root run. It gets watered once a fortnight in summer, along with the rest of the garden. In fact this seems to work for everything in the garden, as nothing shrivels in summer. The only exceptions to this, is some of the blooms on a couple of the roses which open outside of the shade which I have provided for them.
It has seeded itself in deep shade under the orange tree. It will be interesting to see if it will flower there too.

Here it is in early summer.



And here it is in late summer/early autumn, when the sedum below it is about to flower


Daisy :)
Amateur gardener, who has gardened in Surrey and Cornwall, England, but now has a tiny garden facing north west, near the coast in north east Crete. It is 300 meters above sea level. On a steep learning curve!!! Member of both MGS and RHS

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Fermi

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Re: Erigeron karvinskianus
« Reply #1 on: January 10, 2013, 02:56:35 AM »
Because of the way this "seaside" daisy behaved in my previous garden in Melbourne I refused to bring it with us to the country!
However I relented about 5 years ago with a pink flowered variety which must be a hybrid or something as it seems to be sterile - certainly no self sown seedlings popping up everywhere! Now I wonder if it's simply the climate here and that maybe the ordinary form would be less aggressive as well.
cheers
fermi
Mr F de Sousa, Central Victoria, Australia
member of AGS, SRGC, NARGS
working as a physio to support my gardening habit!

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westyboy

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Re: Erigeron karvinskianus
« Reply #2 on: January 10, 2013, 09:54:07 AM »
Well I am definitely sold Daisy, its a must for my garden.

Thanks to a thread from Alistair, I was able to find a seed supplier (BT seeds, in France). Who are able to supply Erigeron Karvinskianus and Lychnis coronaria. (postage 4 euros).
What do you recommend, scattering seeds on proposed site, raising seedlings, or both. (think I've answered my own question there.) ???

Roy
MGS member
Having spent years gardening in the South of England. I thought I was alone struggling with my Mediterranean garden.
Then one day I stumbled upon The MGS and it looks like all my questions can be answered.

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Janet Ibbotson

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Re: Erigeron karvinskianus
« Reply #3 on: January 10, 2013, 08:51:29 PM »
I love erigeron despite its summer disappearing act.  Maybe I should try to improve its soil and tuck it under some rock.  I think it is a keynote plant for garden designer Jean Mus, although it is listed in "Mediterranean Gardens" (a coffee table book about his rather splendid designs but not much useful information on plants) as something completely different.  Can't remember what as my copy is in Greece and I'm in Norfolk for now.

Daisy your garden always looks so lush.  How do you do it on a two weekly watering regime?  Do you have particularly good soil in Crete? 

And on roses, which would you say are the six best climbers for summer flowering in mediterranean conditions - I'm about to plant a pergola for a friend around 200m up on Skopelos in an position exposed to the NE wind.

Janet Ibbotson
MGS Member currently based in Skopelos, Greece but also gardens in Norfolk

Umbrian

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Re: Erigeron karvinskianus
« Reply #4 on: January 11, 2013, 08:12:30 AM »
Erigeron seeds itself easily once you have it in the garden and so to scatter the seeds where you want them should work well but it is always a good idea to raise some in seed trays when starting out with any new venture. Once you have some plants it is easy to split them to plant pieces in other areas as the roots spread underground and small pieces can easily be detached and with minimum care grow away quickly. When I came to Italy I brought one or two small plants with me and now it is a real feature of my garden lining paths and steps and linking the different areas. I have given plants to many friends and visitors who have admired it.
As with Daisy, my plants flower from early spring right through to late autumn and the first frosts. They look a bit tired in the hottest weeks but soon recover once we have had a few autumn showers and the temperature drops a little. A friend of mine ,who always like her garden to be looking good ,cuts hers down in mid summer and irrigates it to encourage new growth but I have so much this is not an option and anyway I do not water anything in my garden once it is established.
This is definitely a "top ten" plant for me and one I could not be without :)
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.

Umbrian

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Re: Erigeron karvinskianus
« Reply #5 on: January 14, 2013, 05:20:40 PM »
I have been reading about what sounds a bit like Erigeron karvinskianus on stilts  ;D and wonder if any members grow this particular Erigeron. It is Erigeron annuus and it's praises were sung by garden designer/writer Mary keen in the December issue of the RHS magazine "The Garden". When visiting the "Special Plants" Nursery run by Derry Watkins she asked her what new favourite plants she could recommend and was shown a small specimin of this plant in a pot. Mary was not impressed until she later saw it growing in the owner's garden and immediately saw its worth. It grows to a height of 1 metre plus on self supporting stems and is topped with a mass of white daisy flowers over a long period. Although stated to be "doubtfully hardy" (in the UK presumably) I would think it would be fine in our warmer Mediterranean areas and a welcome addition for any of us who love E. karvinskianus? Unfortunately there was no 'photo but perhaps somebody can provide one on the Forum.
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.

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yvesans

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Re: Erigeron karvinskianus
« Reply #6 on: January 15, 2013, 07:01:35 PM »
Daisy please tell me about the foxgloves? how do they do? what sort of location do you have them in and how did you start them off?  thanks!
Active gardener all year round in Cyprus, nature always wins!

Daisy

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Re: Erigeron karvinskianus
« Reply #7 on: January 16, 2013, 09:45:08 AM »
Yvesans. I was not at all sure how foxgloves would do here, so I just sowed a few seeds. They germinated well, but to be on the safe side, I planted most of them in summer shade, underneath two apricot trees.
A few of them I planted near an east facing wall, where they would be in full sun for just a few hours each morning.
Well, all of them did very well, which was a happy surprise.
They flowered for a good long time, even the ones in strong morning sun. Lots of seeds were set, but I was a bit tardy in sowing them. I sowed them in late September and although again there was good germination, they are still small plants.
I have planted them all out, again mainly in shade or morning sun, but only time will tell if they will bulk up enough, to flower this spring/summer.
Some of the ladies in the village, admired them last year and asked for seed. So, they could be flowering all over the village in years to come. ;D ;D ;D
Daisy :)
Amateur gardener, who has gardened in Surrey and Cornwall, England, but now has a tiny garden facing north west, near the coast in north east Crete. It is 300 meters above sea level. On a steep learning curve!!! Member of both MGS and RHS

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yvesans

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Re: Erigeron karvinskianus
« Reply #8 on: January 16, 2013, 01:22:21 PM »
I will try for sure they are one of my most favourite plants and give me memories of my Grandparents garden, I just didnt think they would grow here so never tried! thanks a lot!
Active gardener all year round in Cyprus, nature always wins!

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Janet Ibbotson

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Re: Erigeron karvinskianus
« Reply #9 on: January 16, 2013, 07:17:34 PM »
Thanks to Daisy for her generous supply of information.  The question about roses on the thread about erigeron is entirely my fault, many apologies.
Janet Ibbotson
MGS Member currently based in Skopelos, Greece but also gardens in Norfolk

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Alisdair

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Re: Erigeron karvinskianus
« Reply #10 on: January 17, 2013, 11:31:39 AM »
As Daisy asked, I've moved her interesting answer to Janet's question about climbing roses to the thread on climbing roses, which is in the Climbers section, rather than the roses section!
You can find it by clicking here.
Alisdair Aird
Gardens in SE England (Sussex); also coastal Southern Greece, and (in a very small way) South West France; MGS member (and former president); vice chairman RHS Lily Group, past chairman Cyclamen Society