Muscari and relatives

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Fermi

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Re: Muscari and relatives
« Reply #30 on: October 26, 2014, 12:54:42 PM »
In order to give an answer there is a need to see the pedicles at fruiting time.
The length and angle of these are an important feature to destingwish similar species.
Oron,
here's a couple of pics which may help,
cheers
fermi
Mr F de Sousa, Central Victoria, Australia
member of AGS, SRGC, NARGS
working as a physio to support my gardening habit!

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oron peri

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Re: Muscari and relatives
« Reply #31 on: October 26, 2014, 09:03:27 PM »
Fermi,

 The two species I take in consideration are B. ciliata and B. longistyla, but as your plants are still juvenile, meaning less leaves and flowers and ciliate or smooth leaf margins.
I'm afraid that i can not give a definitive answer but i'm inclined towrds B. longistyla.
Garden Designer, Bulb man, Botanical tours guide.
Living and gardening in Tivon, Lower Galilee region, North Israel.
Min temp 5c Max 42c, around 450mm rain.

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Fermi

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Re: Muscari and relatives
« Reply #32 on: October 27, 2014, 07:53:47 AM »
Thanks, Oron,
I'll wait to see if they flower again next year and if there is any difference,
cheers
fermi
Mr F de Sousa, Central Victoria, Australia
member of AGS, SRGC, NARGS
working as a physio to support my gardening habit!

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Fermi

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Re: Muscari and relatives
« Reply #33 on: August 09, 2015, 02:40:30 PM »
Muscari commutatum from seed from Goteborg 2010
cheers
fermi
Mr F de Sousa, Central Victoria, Australia
member of AGS, SRGC, NARGS
working as a physio to support my gardening habit!

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Fermi

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Re: Muscari and relatives 2016
« Reply #34 on: July 05, 2016, 05:50:18 AM »
The Muscari inconstrictum I showed in 2014 is still going strong and flowering better this year,
cheers
fermi
Mr F de Sousa, Central Victoria, Australia
member of AGS, SRGC, NARGS
working as a physio to support my gardening habit!

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Charithea

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Re: Muscari and relatives
« Reply #35 on: July 05, 2016, 12:27:53 PM »
Fermi what a colour!!
I garden in Cyprus, in a flat old farming field, alt. approx. 30 m asl.

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Fermi

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Re: Muscari and relatives
« Reply #36 on: August 12, 2016, 01:16:06 PM »
I think I got this as seed as Muscari azureum but it looks more like Pseudomuscari chalusicum
cheers
fermi
Mr F de Sousa, Central Victoria, Australia
member of AGS, SRGC, NARGS
working as a physio to support my gardening habit!

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Fermi

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Re: Muscari and relatives
« Reply #37 on: August 14, 2016, 01:36:29 PM »
The Muscari commutatum shown last year is doing even better this year
cheers
fermi
Mr F de Sousa, Central Victoria, Australia
member of AGS, SRGC, NARGS
working as a physio to support my gardening habit!

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Fermi

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Re: Muscari and relatives
« Reply #38 on: September 11, 2018, 11:13:30 AM »
I've previously posted pics of this muscari as M. commutatum but I was corrected that it is in fact a form of Muscari neglectum - which explains why it is doing so well!
cheers
fermi
Mr F de Sousa, Central Victoria, Australia
member of AGS, SRGC, NARGS
working as a physio to support my gardening habit!

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Fermi

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Re: Muscari and relatives
« Reply #39 on: September 16, 2018, 12:05:32 PM »
Bellevalia paradoxa from seed from SRGC Seedex 2012
cheers
fermi
Mr F de Sousa, Central Victoria, Australia
member of AGS, SRGC, NARGS
working as a physio to support my gardening habit!