Muscari and relatives

  • 54 Replies
  • 39209 Views

Trevor Australis

  • Sr. Member
Re: Muscari and relatives
« Reply #15 on: March 24, 2013, 07:33:16 AM »
Wild guesses: M. armeniacum Do you know where the seed was from if, in fact, it was seed raised?

M. botryoides Album? M. argaeum - my spelling could be wrong? Over to Oron I think.
M Land. Arch., B. Sp. Ed. Teacher, traveller and usually climate compatible.

*

oron peri

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
    • http://www.greentours.co.uk/Leader/Oron-Peri/
    • Email
Re: Muscari and relatives
« Reply #16 on: March 24, 2013, 11:10:18 AM »
Michael, i would think as Trevor suggested to be a white form of Muscari armeniacum.

Trevor, M. argaeum is now Muscari armeniacum 'Argei White' but i do not think it is this one as there is a hint of blue color on some of Michael's flowers.
Garden Designer, Bulb man, Botanical tours guide.
Living and gardening in Tivon, Lower Galilee region, North Israel.
Min temp 5c Max 42c, around 450mm rain.

Re: Muscari and relatives
« Reply #17 on: March 24, 2013, 11:44:47 AM »
Thanks folks, I will go with armeniacum then. I have no idea where it came from.

*

Fermi

  • Hero Member
    • Email
Re: Muscari and relatives
« Reply #18 on: April 17, 2014, 08:39:25 AM »
A close up of the flower head of the autumn flowering Muscari parviflorum,
cheers
fermi
Mr F de Sousa, Central Victoria, Australia
member of AGS, SRGC, NARGS
working as a physio to support my gardening habit!

*

Fermi

  • Hero Member
    • Email
Re: Muscari and relatives
« Reply #19 on: August 05, 2014, 08:55:48 AM »
Muscari inconstrictum grown from seed sown in 2009 from two sources.
The larger one flowered for the first time last year and the seed came from the AGS Seedex,
the smaller two came from Kurt Vickery and flowered for the first time this year,
cheers
fermi
Mr F de Sousa, Central Victoria, Australia
member of AGS, SRGC, NARGS
working as a physio to support my gardening habit!

*

Fermi

  • Hero Member
    • Email
Re: Muscari and relatives
« Reply #20 on: August 25, 2014, 12:42:20 PM »
I love the subtle colouring on Muscari muscarima.
This is one I bought from Marcus Harvey at Hillview Rare Plants in Tasmania a few years ago which has stayed a singleton, but I'm hoping that some seed raised ones will flower soon (and be true to name!)
cheers
fermi
Mr F de Sousa, Central Victoria, Australia
member of AGS, SRGC, NARGS
working as a physio to support my gardening habit!

*

Fermi

  • Hero Member
    • Email
Re: Muscari and relatives
« Reply #21 on: August 28, 2014, 03:11:02 PM »
This little muscari was grown from seed from 'Gul Delight' - a selection made by Rannweig Wallis in Wales,
cheers
fermi
Mr F de Sousa, Central Victoria, Australia
member of AGS, SRGC, NARGS
working as a physio to support my gardening habit!

*

Fermi

  • Hero Member
    • Email
Re: Muscari and relatives
« Reply #22 on: August 29, 2014, 01:54:35 PM »
I got this one about 30 years ago as "Muscari cyanea violacea" - Oron has identified it as a form of Muscari armeniacum,
cheers
fermi
Mr F de Sousa, Central Victoria, Australia
member of AGS, SRGC, NARGS
working as a physio to support my gardening habit!

*

Fermi

  • Hero Member
    • Email
Re: Muscari and relatives
« Reply #23 on: September 10, 2014, 09:26:22 AM »
I grew this from SRGC Seedex as Bellevalia ciliata, but it may be another similar one - maybe Oron could give his opinion?
cheers
fermi
Mr F de Sousa, Central Victoria, Australia
member of AGS, SRGC, NARGS
working as a physio to support my gardening habit!

*

Fermi

  • Hero Member
    • Email
Re: Muscari and relatives
« Reply #24 on: October 07, 2014, 12:47:01 PM »
A couple of late ones:
The dark blue Muscari leucostomum and the violet/cream/brown Muscari (Leopoldia) weissii
cheers
fermi
« Last Edit: October 08, 2014, 12:54:41 PM by Fermi »
Mr F de Sousa, Central Victoria, Australia
member of AGS, SRGC, NARGS
working as a physio to support my gardening habit!

HansA

  • Jr. Member
Re: Muscari and relatives
« Reply #25 on: October 08, 2014, 06:55:00 PM »
1.Muscari parviflorum in flower now - those are some stockplants from Jim Archibald.
2.Muscari spec. - I took the picture this spring in northern Iran  (Azerbayjan) - it was a very compact plant growing between rocks. Next to the rocky areas were cultivated fields where much higher and much darker Muscari with shorter flowerheads grew - ( M. neglectum?) - any ideas? perhaps M.a.v. szovitzianum?
bulbgrower on the balearic islands, spain
landscape architect

*

oron peri

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
    • http://www.greentours.co.uk/Leader/Oron-Peri/
    • Email
Re: Muscari and relatives
« Reply #26 on: October 09, 2014, 10:31:30 AM »
Hi Hans

Yes, i would say M. armeniacun [syn M. szovitsianum], while the dark form you describe may well be M. neglectum.
Here is one of which i took photos in Turkey, looks very similar.
« Last Edit: October 09, 2014, 10:39:55 AM by oron peri »
Garden Designer, Bulb man, Botanical tours guide.
Living and gardening in Tivon, Lower Galilee region, North Israel.
Min temp 5c Max 42c, around 450mm rain.

*

Fermi

  • Hero Member
    • Email
Re: Muscari and relatives
« Reply #27 on: October 20, 2014, 12:55:58 PM »
Wow, Hans, that form of Muscari armeniacum (szovitsianum) looks quite spectacular!

Oron, any suggestions about the Bellavalia ciliata I posted about?

... the violet/cream/brown Muscari (Leopoldia) weissii
cheers
fermi
Over a week later and the spikes have developed a bit more,
cheers
fermi
Mr F de Sousa, Central Victoria, Australia
member of AGS, SRGC, NARGS
working as a physio to support my gardening habit!

*

oron peri

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
    • http://www.greentours.co.uk/Leader/Oron-Peri/
    • Email
Re: Muscari and relatives
« Reply #28 on: October 23, 2014, 08:55:24 AM »
I grew this from SRGC Seedex as Bellevalia ciliata, but it may be another similar one - maybe Oron could give his opinion?
cheers
fermi

Hi Fermi

Bellevalia is definatly the most difficult genus in terms of ID in particularly when plants are young as yours
In order to give an answer there is a need to see the pedicles at fruiting time.
The length and angle of these are an important feature to destingwish similar species.
« Last Edit: October 23, 2014, 12:17:58 PM by oron peri »
Garden Designer, Bulb man, Botanical tours guide.
Living and gardening in Tivon, Lower Galilee region, North Israel.
Min temp 5c Max 42c, around 450mm rain.

*

Fermi

  • Hero Member
    • Email
Re: Muscari and relatives
« Reply #29 on: October 23, 2014, 01:27:28 PM »
Hi Oron,
Thanks, I'll try to post some pics of the fruiting stems soon,
cheers
fermi
Mr F de Sousa, Central Victoria, Australia
member of AGS, SRGC, NARGS
working as a physio to support my gardening habit!