Aristolochia

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Marilyn

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Re: Aristolochia
« Reply #15 on: October 26, 2011, 04:54:58 PM »
Goodness me! What an unfortunate-looking creature the A. hirta is... A. lycica I find very charming though. Would I be right in thinking its leaves are actually the less obvious ones in the picture, i.e. the heart-shaped, marbled ones?
I work in hotel and private gardens, promoting sustainable landscape management in the mediterranean climate through the use of diverse, beautiful and appropriate plants. At home, I garden on two balconies containing mostly succulents.

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Alisdair

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Re: Aristolochia
« Reply #16 on: October 26, 2011, 05:28:05 PM »
No, it actually has those striking arrow-shaped leaves, so it's identifiable even without the flowers.
Alisdair Aird
Gardens in SE England (Sussex); also coastal Southern Greece, and (in a very small way) South West France; MGS member (and current president); vice chairman RHS Lily Group, past chairman Cyclamen Society

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Alisdair

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Re: Aristolochia
« Reply #17 on: October 26, 2011, 05:34:51 PM »
And did you see this big chap when we were at the Soller Botanic Gardens on Mallorca, Marilyn? Aristolochia littoralis, syn. A. elegans, a close relative of A. gigantea but a bit smaller and more clearly lobed. Lindsay said that quite a few people in Spain grow it.
« Last Edit: October 26, 2011, 05:55:52 PM by Alisdair »
Alisdair Aird
Gardens in SE England (Sussex); also coastal Southern Greece, and (in a very small way) South West France; MGS member (and current president); vice chairman RHS Lily Group, past chairman Cyclamen Society

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Marilyn

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Re: Aristolochia
« Reply #18 on: October 26, 2011, 06:13:15 PM »
I did indeed! What a stunner. Hope to fit one of those into the exotic patch over here. :)
I work in hotel and private gardens, promoting sustainable landscape management in the mediterranean climate through the use of diverse, beautiful and appropriate plants. At home, I garden on two balconies containing mostly succulents.

aristoflora

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Re: Aristolochia
« Reply #19 on: March 23, 2016, 09:43:06 PM »
Good evening!

I want to introduce myself as an Aristolochia enthusiast from Germany and got really caught by the awesome oddities presented in this forum.
It's a pity there are so many hardy mediterranean Aristolochia species nobody cultivates or has ever heard of. Even on the smallest isles like the Egadian islands, Malta, Menorca, Samos and Corsica there are breathtaking endemic species of whose ecobiology there is almost nothing known about.

Currently A. bianorii is flowering in my greenhouse (don't be confused by the A. rotunda label, it belongs to another plant), an endemic species from Mallorca and A. paucinervis, an absolutely lovely and hardy species from southern Spain.

Warm regards,
aristoflora

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Alisdair

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Re: Aristolochia
« Reply #20 on: March 24, 2016, 06:58:56 AM »
Welcome, aristoflora! And thanks very much for those pictures. I hope you'll show us more in the future, as they flower.
Alisdair Aird
Gardens in SE England (Sussex); also coastal Southern Greece, and (in a very small way) South West France; MGS member (and current president); vice chairman RHS Lily Group, past chairman Cyclamen Society

aristoflora

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Re: Aristolochia
« Reply #21 on: March 24, 2016, 08:49:31 PM »
Thanks for welcoming - and of course I will share more, certainly.

Today some more hardy species started to flower  :D ... the rare Aristolochia clusii from Puglia and Sicily as well as Aristolochia pallida from mediterranean France!

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JTh

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Re: Aristolochia
« Reply #22 on: March 26, 2016, 12:16:24 PM »
Another Aristolochia, A. cretica, seen in a rocky area in Crete a couple of years ago. The plant is sprawling, and the flowers are quite large.

_DSC8710 Aristolochia cretica.jpg
by Jorun Tharaldsen, on Flickr
Veterinary surgeon by training with a phD in parasitology, worked as virologist since 1992.
Member of the MGS and Branch website editor. Gardening in Oslo and to a limited extent in Halkidiki, Greece.

Hilary

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Re: Aristolochia
« Reply #23 on: March 29, 2016, 08:00:03 AM »
Thanks for the photos.
Those are plants I have always wondered about but have never seen.
It will be interesting to see more from your collection
MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

aristoflora

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Re: Aristolochia
« Reply #24 on: March 29, 2016, 08:50:49 AM »
As far as I'm concerned you have a very high chance to see them - in Germany the only species is A. clematitis, whereas in Greece there are more than 5 or 6 ones + 2 endemic.

Regards,
aristoflora

Hilary

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Re: Aristolochia
« Reply #25 on: March 30, 2016, 11:48:10 AM »
Yes, you are right. It just means getting out of the house and going to some forest or other at the right time of the year.
MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

Hilary

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Re: Aristolochia
« Reply #26 on: April 05, 2016, 05:53:51 PM »
Hi thanks for the message.
I am the one who has never seen these plants and would find it difficult to find them.
Others who live near forests or are regular hikers probably could help you.
MGS member
Living in Korinthos, Greece.
No garden but two balconies, one facing south and the other north.
Most of my plants are succulents which need little care

Pallas

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Re: Aristolochia
« Reply #27 on: May 05, 2017, 09:53:34 AM »
Fleur has just referred me to this fascinating thread: I discovered that what I thought was a morning glory was in fact Aristolochus baetica! Identified by Hilary, thank you, in the Plant ID forum. Here are the photos I took, it is a lovely thing (and thankfully, no sign of the 'rotting meat' smell I read about!). The vernacular name Dutchman's pipe is wonderfully evocative.
Small (350m2) south-facing garden on the outskirts of Malaga. RHS H2 / USDA 10b.