Clematis

  • 34 Replies
  • 24958 Views
*

John

  • Hero Member
Clematis
« on: July 15, 2011, 05:35:00 PM »
I have grown Clematis uncinata now for about 30 years and the seeds came from a plant on the front of Myddleton House. Enfield, Bowles' old garden. I was given seed by the then head gardener. It is a rampant evergreen from China and rather like something between C. armandii and C. vitalba. The leaves a attractive and even have marbling in then at their early juvenile stage but this is short lived. The fragrant flowers are very like C. vitalba which I suppose could be a bit of a disappointment except they are really quite fragrant and born in their masses. To my knowledge it grows to over 10 meters and is long-lived. It is still relatively rare in cultivation. I suspect that it would do well in the right place in the Med.
« Last Edit: October 13, 2011, 09:05:15 AM by John »
John
Horticulturist, photographer, author, garden designer and plant breeder; MGS member and RHS committee member. I garden at home in SW London and also at work in South London.

*

Alisdair

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
Clematis campaniflora
« Reply #1 on: July 15, 2011, 07:32:58 PM »
Clematis campaniflora grows easily from seed. It is a southern European (from Portugal), much less showy than its more familiar relation Clematis viticella, but does have a modest charm. Its small very pale blue flowers are not so bell-like as its Latin name implies. Although it grows very strongly indeed in damp conditions and good soil, drought and poor soil keep it to a more manageable size.
Alisdair Aird
Gardens in SE England (Sussex); also coastal Southern Greece, and (in a very small way) South West France; MGS member (and former president); vice chairman RHS Lily Group, past chairman Cyclamen Society

*

Alisdair

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
Clematis integrifolia
« Reply #2 on: July 16, 2011, 07:57:30 AM »
Clematis integrifolia is not strictly speaking a climber, more of a scrambler. It is herbaceous, and grows well as cover for a fence, growing to a maximum of two or three metres. It tolerates dry conditions but does need occasional deep watering and would probably not succeed in hot gardens, unless in a shady relatively moist spot. Its flowers are slightly fragrant. It comes easily from seed, and is quite variable. The picture shows one we grow, with wavier-edged flowers than usual; our seed was originally said to be of a form of Clematis crispa found in Texas, but in that species the sepals are joined together forming an urn, and in this they are entirely separate, so I believe it to be of a good form of C. integrifolia instead - I'd be very glad to hear from you if you disagree!
Alisdair Aird
Gardens in SE England (Sussex); also coastal Southern Greece, and (in a very small way) South West France; MGS member (and former president); vice chairman RHS Lily Group, past chairman Cyclamen Society

*

John

  • Hero Member
Re: Clematis
« Reply #3 on: July 16, 2011, 09:01:12 AM »
Yes it looks like a form of C. integrifolia to me.
John
Horticulturist, photographer, author, garden designer and plant breeder; MGS member and RHS committee member. I garden at home in SW London and also at work in South London.

*

John

  • Hero Member
Re: Clematis
« Reply #4 on: July 16, 2011, 09:08:02 AM »
I crossed C. 'Jackmanii' with an form of C. viticella and grew on 4 seedlings all of which are similar. As C. 'Jackmanii' has C. viticella in it's blood it was not surprising that they look like C. viticella but are rather nice if nothing special.
John
Horticulturist, photographer, author, garden designer and plant breeder; MGS member and RHS committee member. I garden at home in SW London and also at work in South London.

*

John

  • Hero Member
Re: Clematis
« Reply #5 on: July 16, 2011, 09:42:21 AM »
I forgot to mention that it was growing in a mixture of Itea ilicifolia and Vitis vinifera 'Purpurea'.
John
Horticulturist, photographer, author, garden designer and plant breeder; MGS member and RHS committee member. I garden at home in SW London and also at work in South London.

Daisy

  • Sr. Member
Clematis
« Reply #6 on: October 12, 2011, 12:57:52 PM »
I find my clematis behave very differently here than they did in England. This is to be expected of course. Whereas in England, my viticella clematis always started flowering around or after Midsummer Day, and continued into the autumn. Here  they start flowering very early in Spring and stop in July. Then they can start again in the autumn and continue until Christmas.
This year however, only Clematis Perle d'Azur had budded up again.
That is until dear Alkis, who is laying the paths and steps for me, broke the main stem with his wheelbarrow!!! :o :o :o
Here it is earlier this year, with climbing rose Colombian Climber.
Daisy



Amateur gardener, who has gardened in Surrey and Cornwall, England, but now has a tiny garden facing north west, near the coast in north east Crete. It is 300 meters above sea level. On a steep learning curve!!! Member of both MGS and RHS

*

John

  • Hero Member
Re: Clematis
« Reply #7 on: March 04, 2012, 11:41:22 AM »
Clematis cirrhosa is at it's height of flowering in London just now.
John
Horticulturist, photographer, author, garden designer and plant breeder; MGS member and RHS committee member. I garden at home in SW London and also at work in South London.

*

Bolanthus

  • Newbie
    • Email
Re: Clematis
« Reply #8 on: July 12, 2013, 05:37:00 PM »
Clematis flammula from western Attica in flower now. There is some confusion distinguishing between C. flammula and C. vitalba. The former has fragrant flowers, smaller leaves and somehow more delicate flowers. The seeds are different too.
Those of C. flammula: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/79/Clematis_flammula_1.JPG
Those of C. vitalba: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/c/c9/Clematis_vitalba_IP0602021.jpg

The latin word flammula is equivalent to "little flame" and indeed this marvelous plant produces masses of pure white fragrant flowers. As it can be found in excellent shape in hot Attica in Pinus halepensis clearings -maquis and edges of vineyards [together with other interesting plants like Acanthus spinosus], I believe that it could be an outstanding addition to the mediterranean garden!


Aris Zografidis
A lot of interest for the mediterranean flora and for the water wise gardening –but no garden yet. 
my blog on Greek Flora: ROSA SEMPERVIRENS

Umbrian

  • Hero Member
    • Email
Re: Clematis
« Reply #9 on: July 13, 2013, 06:01:09 AM »
Wonderful photos Bolanthus - how easy it is to fail to appreciate flowers such as these that grow in the countryside around us and are really garden worthy. I often recommend Spartium junceum to people seeking advice as to what to put in their Mediterranean gardens and often receive a thumbs down because it is so prolific in the wild. Interestingly I noticed the other year the stunning effect of Spartiums intertwined with one of the clematis you discussed (not sure exactly which one but will try to learn now!) I have copied this planting in my garden and am well pleased with the result.White Valerian underplanting adds to the effect.
MGS member living and gardening in Umbria, Italy for past 19 years. Recently moved from my original house and now planning and planting a new small garden.

David Bracey

  • Hero Member
    • Email
Re: Clematis
« Reply #10 on: July 13, 2013, 09:03:33 AM »
Two other plants which are overlooked in the garden are Jasminum  fruticans and Aphyllanthes monspeliensis which occurs in stunning blue drifts on the garrigue.
« Last Edit: July 13, 2013, 09:18:03 AM by Alisdair »
MGS member.

 I have gardened in sub-tropical Florida, maritime UK, continental Europe and the Mediterranean basin, France. Of the 4 I have found that the most difficult climate for gardening is the latter.

*

Fermi

  • Hero Member
    • Email
Re: Clematis
« Reply #11 on: December 01, 2013, 07:29:31 AM »
We have clematis scattered around the garden but mostly where they can be watered during dry weather. This year Clematis 'Hagley Hybrid' has grown through to intermingle with the darker 'Gypsy Queen',
cheers
fermi
Mr F de Sousa, Central Victoria, Australia
member of AGS, SRGC, NARGS
working as a physio to support my gardening habit!

*

John

  • Hero Member
Re: Clematis
« Reply #12 on: December 01, 2013, 10:42:54 AM »
Bolanthus saw Clematis flammula in flower in July and a couple of weeks ago (in November) I saw it between Kalamata and Stoupa in the Peloponnese just going past its best. Flowering time may depend on a variety of circumstances.
John
Horticulturist, photographer, author, garden designer and plant breeder; MGS member and RHS committee member. I garden at home in SW London and also at work in South London.

*

John

  • Hero Member
Re: Clematis
« Reply #13 on: December 01, 2013, 10:45:43 AM »
Just to confirm this variation in flowering time at least of the species C. flammula and C. cirrhosa this is the same C. cirrhosa I posted last year flowering in the spring and here it is flowering at its peak last week!
John
Horticulturist, photographer, author, garden designer and plant breeder; MGS member and RHS committee member. I garden at home in SW London and also at work in South London.

*

Alisdair

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
Re: Clematis
« Reply #14 on: December 01, 2013, 11:05:01 AM »
In the Peloponnese C. cirrhosa was just starting last week.
Alisdair Aird
Gardens in SE England (Sussex); also coastal Southern Greece, and (in a very small way) South West France; MGS member (and former president); vice chairman RHS Lily Group, past chairman Cyclamen Society