Exotic fruit trees

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John J

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Exotic fruit trees
« Reply #30 on: July 02, 2014, 12:37:41 PM »
Thanks, Pamela, you obviously posted your reply at the same time that I was composing and posting mine. Must be one of the quickest responses on record :)
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

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John J

  • Hero Member
Exotic fruit trees
« Reply #31 on: July 02, 2014, 12:42:10 PM »
The flowers are not only pretty, they are beautiful, and the petals are edible. A colourful addition to fruit salad.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

Alice

  • Hero Member
Exotic fruit trees
« Reply #32 on: July 02, 2014, 05:45:39 PM »
Thank you, Pamela and John, for the info on Feijoa fruit.
I will try to give the plants some extra water when I can.
Amateur gardener who has gardened in north London and now gardens part of the year on the Cycladic island of Paros. Conditions: coastal, windy, annual rainfall 350mm, temp 0-35 degrees C.

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John J

  • Hero Member
Re: Exotic fruit trees
« Reply #33 on: May 28, 2016, 09:58:43 AM »
Gosh, nearly 2 years since anything was posted on here.
The following may not look very impressive but they are the first embryonic fruit to appear on our Walnut tree. It's been a long wait. :D
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

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John J

  • Hero Member
Re: Exotic fruit trees
« Reply #34 on: September 10, 2016, 09:15:19 AM »
Possibly due to the lack of sufficient water caused by the very dry winter we had our Mango has produced one solitary fruit this year.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

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MikeHardman

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    • www.mikehardman.com
Re: Exotic fruit trees
« Reply #35 on: September 10, 2016, 10:11:36 AM »
Disappointing, John!
A friend in Argaka has two mangoes. Both produced a good crop of tasty fruit this year (as in previous years).
I have to say, though, that the trees don't look nearly as luxuriant as several others I know that seem to produce no fruit at all. Maybe lack of pollination causes lack of fruit, and that allows the trees to make such good vegetative growth?
Mike
Geologist by Uni training, IT consultant, Referee for Viola for Botanical Society of the British Isles, commissioned author and photographer on Viola for RHS (Enc. of Perennials, The Garden, The Plantsman).
I garden near Polis, Cyprus, 100m alt., on marl, but have gardened mainly in S.England

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John J

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Re: Exotic fruit trees
« Reply #36 on: September 10, 2016, 02:03:49 PM »
We seemed to get the usual amount of flowers in the spring but for some reason they didn't set fruit. Whether this can be attributed to the unusual weather patterns we've experienced this year I don't know. Lack of pollinators, poor fruit set, inability of the tree to hold the fruit for some reason?
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)

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John J

  • Hero Member
Re: Exotic fruit trees
« Reply #37 on: January 12, 2018, 11:11:20 AM »
Over the years we have done little or nothing with the fruit growing on our medlar tree. They need a period of cold to ripen and our property in Cyprus does not provide that naturally. Last year I decided that maybe it was time we tried sticking a few of them in the fridge for a week or several. Today I remembered to look at them and lo and behold they were soft and spongy to the touch. They proved to be extremely tasty although, unfortunately, we didn't have a silver spoon to eat them with and I don't like port, their traditional accompaniment.
Cyprus Branch Head. Gardens in a field 40 m above sea level with reasonably fertile clay soil.
"Aphrodite emerged from the sea and came ashore and at her feet all manner of plants sprang forth" John Deacon (13thC AD)