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Our Gardens / Re: A to Z of plants continuation
« Last post by John J on Today at 07:19:32 AM »
Our Aeonium arboreum atropurpureum is situated at the side of our entrance driveway and is in full sun for most of the day. It produces large, conical spires of small yellow flowers in winter, that have by now gone over. It is less attractive in summer when the rosettes of leaves close up as a protective measure against the intense heat.
Last December we acquired a cutting of 'Zwartkop' that appears to be settling but we'll see how it survives the summer.
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Miscellaneous / Re: Plants of the world on postage stamps
« Last post by Hilary on Today at 05:33:49 AM »
Lysandria bellargus , Adonis Blue

The Royal Mail issued a 10 stamp series featuring ENDANGERED INSECTS of the UK in 2008
I will be posting a scan of the stamp and a scan of part of the information leaflet from the presentation pack.
The presentation pack was sent to me by my friend Helen in Scotland
Since I don't have photos of insects I won't be adding my photos to these posts
Anyone wanting to add their photos is very welcome
Another butterfly you won't see in Mediterranean gardens

However, all is not lost the  article by Melissa  Hamilton
GOING NATIVE: GARDEN DESIGN FOR WILDLIFE is interesting
THE MEDITERRANEAN GARDEN number 85 , July 2016
Yes, just checked butterflies are mentioned .
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Our Gardens / Re: A to Z of plants continuation
« Last post by John J on May 21, 2019, 03:27:13 PM »
Acca sellowiana, Pineapple guava. Our plants were grown from seeds obtained from Chiltern Seeds in UK at least 20 years ago.
Beautiful flowers that have edible petals and plum-sized fruit that need a spell of cold to ripen fully, something that they do not get here in our garden.
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Plant identification / Re: A ? bee orchid confirmed as Ophrys apifera
« Last post by Alisdair on May 21, 2019, 08:48:05 AM »
Jan, it looks as if it's Ophrys apifera itself, the one that's actually named "the bee-carrying orchid"!
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Plant identification / A ? bee orchid confirmed as Ophrys apifera
« Last post by Umbrian on May 21, 2019, 07:16:53 AM »
Another possible Bee Orchid for ID please.
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Miscellaneous / Re: Plants of the world on postage stamps
« Last post by Hilary on May 21, 2019, 07:07:38 AM »

Echinops viscosus, Viscous Globe Thistle

A stamp issued in 1980 by Israel

The Globe Thistle is in a list compiled by Judy Thomas
THE MEDITERRANEAN GARDEN number 91, January 2019.
SOME WONDERFUL MEDITERRANEAN PLANTS 
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Our Gardens / Re: A to Z of plants continuation
« Last post by John J on May 20, 2019, 07:45:14 AM »
Found time to add our second acanthus, Acanthus mollis. Mollis meaning soft, pliant, the exact opposite of the previous plant.
Well known as the symbol of the MGS, and the pattern for the capitals of the Corinthian columns.
Native to SW Europe and NW Africa it has become a popular garden plant, needing little or no attention apart form tidying up once its growing season ends.
Easily grown from even the smallest root cutting, so much so that it can become invasive.
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Miscellaneous / Re: Plants of the world on postage stamps
« Last post by Hilary on May 20, 2019, 05:21:34 AM »
Caltha polypetala, Giant Marsh Marigold 

Bulgaria issued a six stamp sheet depicting WATER FLOWERS in 1988
 
You can read about this plant here
https://www.rhs.org.uk/Plants/105708/i-Caltha-polypetala-i-Hochst-ex-Lorent/Details

This plant also featured on a stamp from Finland

Caltha palustris is mentioned in THE MEDITERRANEAN GARDEN number 82, October 2015
Read EPIRUS THE MEDITERRANEAN GARDEN SOCIETY TRIP MAY 2015
By John Joynes
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Our Gardens / Re: A to Z of plants continuation
« Last post by John J on May 19, 2019, 05:48:36 PM »
Encouraged by the positive responses, thank you, I'll post the next one this evening as tomorrow I may be busy.
Acanthus arboreus an unusual, red-flowered acanthus from Africa. Ours was obtained from Sparoza in 2012. Unlike many acanthus it does not disappear in the summer but continues to grow, and grow, as is implied by the species name, arboreus (tree-like). Knowing this we gave ours plenty of space but over the 7 years it has filled it and now really needs to be pruned back. I am contemplating trying to borrow a suit of armour from the local medieval museum in order to do this as this is one VICIOUS plant!
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Our Gardens / Re: A to Z of plants continuation
« Last post by Umbrian on May 19, 2019, 03:23:47 PM »
Looking forward to your posts on this too.
Whilst on the subject of Abutilon I have been amazed by the performance of my Abutilon megapotamicum. When we moved house I brought it with me as I had had it in a pot being unsure of its hardiness. Not knowing where to place it, as space is much more limited now , I repotted it into a large stone trough that stands outside the wall bounding our small front garden. This is a cold spot and receives no direct sunshine at any time. Amazingly the Abutilon has not only survived but has grown steadily and is already back in flower.
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