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Miscellaneous / Re: Plants of the world on postage stamps
« Last post by Hilary on Today at 07:02:51 AM »
Cedrus libani, Cedar of Lebanon

This stamp was issued by Lebanon in 1955 in a series named Cedar of Lebanon and Baalbek

The photo was sent to me by a friend, who lives in Leeds, UK. of a  Cedar tree  growing in her back garden

There are many references to the Cedar of Lebanon tree in
 THE MEDITERRANEAN GARDEN
 I have chosen HUNTING FOR WILD FLOWERS IN
SOUTH- WEST TURKEY by Fleur Pavlidis for you to read.
TMG number 61, July 2010
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Miscellaneous / Re: Plants of the world on postage stamps
« Last post by Hilary on January 15, 2018, 06:33:24 AM »
Myosotidium hortensia, Chatham Islands Lily

A stamp issued by New Zealand in 1970
While the plant is named on the stamp as a lily the official New Zealand website calls it a forget- me- not
Read about it here
http://www.doc.govt.nz/nature/native-plants/chatham-island-forget-me-not/

This forget-me-not is mentioned in the article by Caroline Davies
A GARDEN FRIENDSHIP, THE MEDITERRANEAN GARDEN issue 74, October 2013
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Miscellaneous / Re: Plants of the world on postage stamps
« Last post by Hilary on January 14, 2018, 06:13:39 AM »
Brassica oleracea, Brussels Sprout

The last stamp from the series FRUIT & VEG issued by the Royal Mail in 2003

This is a vegetable one doesnít normally come across in Greece so I was thrilled one day to see some in the supermarket, bought them then immediately forgot about them. When they came to light again, at the back of the proverbial fridge, all the dark green outer leaves had to be discarded, hence their pale colour.

I didnít expect to find references to this vegetable in
 THE MEDITERRANEAN GARDEN but I was wrong
In TMG issue 58, October 2009 it is mentioned in two articles
NOTES FROM A NOVICE VEGETABLE GROWER by Trevor Nottle
 and
GROWING VEGETABLES FOR SELF- SUFFICIENCY AND HEALTH
 by Clodagh & Dick Handscombe
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Miscellaneous / Re: Plants of the world on postage stamps
« Last post by Hilary on January 13, 2018, 06:59:36 AM »
Citrus limon, Lemon

One more stamp from the series issued by the Royal Mail in 2003 going under the name of FRUIT& VEG

All my neighbours seem to have access to lemon trees and they keep me steadily supplied. If I ever run out of lemons it nearly breaks my heart to buy some.
The lemons in the photo were given to me by one of my neighbours

Leonard Pearcey writes about growing lemons in his article
GREATEST GARDENING JOYS.
You will find this article in
THE MEDITERRANEAN GARDEN issue number 25, July 2001
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Drimia maritima is in bloom in our garden in 2 places - a few years ago the clump was disrupted by a back hoe when we were having some earthworks done. A lot of the bulbs were split in two but they eventually recovered and a few bulbs were planted in a separate place,
cheers
fermi
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Fruit and Vegetables / Re: Exotic fruit trees
« Last post by John J on January 12, 2018, 11:11:20 AM »
Over the years we have done little or nothing with the fruit growing on our medlar tree. They need a period of cold to ripen and our property in Cyprus does not provide that naturally. Last year I decided that maybe it was time we tried sticking a few of them in the fridge for a week or several. Today I remembered to look at them and lo and behold they were soft and spongy to the touch. They proved to be extremely tasty although, unfortunately, we didn't have a silver spoon to eat them with and I don't like port, their traditional accompaniment.
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Miscellaneous / Re: Plant of the Day
« Last post by Umbrian on January 12, 2018, 08:16:33 AM »
My first introduction to this plant was very similar Daisy many years ago in the U.K. Walking through a small park in our local town I was intrigued by the lovely scent all around me and could not ascertain where it was coming from, everything looked quite dead and lifeless. Then I spotted the small white flowers along the bare branches of several untidy looking shrubs- they had been 'pruned' at some time rather haphazardly as often happens in municipal planting. It became  a ' must have' immediately and has featured in my gardens ever since. Luckily it survives the summer heat and drought well here in Italy and never ceases to please. I find that due to its exuberant and often untidy growth it is best placed in an inconspicuous place as the scent carries well although it will stand severe pruning if necessary.
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Miscellaneous / Re: Plants of the world on postage stamps
« Last post by Hilary on January 12, 2018, 07:11:44 AM »
Solanum lycopersicum, Tomato

Yet another stamp issued by the Royal Mail in 2003 in the series FRUIT & VEG

The tomatoes were bought especially for this post then eaten, of course.

Tomatoes are widely grown in Mediterranean gardens and in pots on balconies
In THE MEDITERRANEAN GARDEN there is a whole article devoted to tomatoes
TALKING TOMATOES by Tom Wellsted in TMG number 9, Summer 1997
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Miscellaneous / Re: Plant of the Day
« Last post by Daisy on January 11, 2018, 10:43:18 AM »
Lovely scent. There used to be one near where I worked in England. I used to stop and sniff it for ages when I could.
 I got a few funny looks from passers by.
Daisy
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Miscellaneous / Re: Plant of the Day
« Last post by Umbrian on January 11, 2018, 08:55:29 AM »
Another winter flowering shrub with a wonderful scent, much sharper and less cloying than the Chimonanthus- Lonicera fragrantissima.
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