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Miscellaneous => Miscellaneous => Topic started by: John J on January 23, 2016, 12:47:28 PM

Title: Morning walk
Post by: John J on January 23, 2016, 12:47:28 PM
Today being bright and sunny we ventured out for a short walk on the edge of the village. Not a lot of activity amongst the wild flowers, possibly due to the rains arriving very late this year. Below are a couple of photos that I took.
Anemone coronaria and Lycium ferocissimum, flower and fruit.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on February 01, 2016, 04:51:46 PM
February 1st and this morning we ventured a little further afield for our morning walk. As far as the ancient ruins at Kourion on the south coast of the island and only a five minute drive from home. Until relatively recently these ruins were open to all and the local shepherds grazed their flocks of sheep and goats over, around and through them with the resultant devastation to all plant life. However, since the Antiquities Department eventually got around to fencing off the area and began to charge for admission the change has been dramatic. With the domestic livestock no longer an issue the recovery has improved year upon year.
I took a few photos and will post them here beginning with Fagonia cretica. This rambling sub-shrub is more often found scrambling through and over other shrubs but here it is carpeting the ground.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on February 02, 2016, 06:11:47 AM
The Cyclamen persicum that were rarely seen, except in places that the animals couldn't get at them, are now abundant.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Alisdair on February 02, 2016, 08:50:21 AM
Interesting that previously those browsing animals meant that you didn't often see cyclamens there. I wonder if it was them trampling rather than eating (cyclamen is supposed to be poisonous to animals)? In mainland Greece Cyclamen graecum seems to grow as happily on those olive terraces where animals graze as those where they don't.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on February 02, 2016, 12:34:29 PM
An interesting point, Alisdair, and one I hadn't considered. On reflection it was also, of course, open to human traffic and was something of a playground for the local children, all of which could have been a contributing factor.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on February 03, 2016, 05:48:07 AM
Rather forbidding looking Anchusa aegyptiaca.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Alisdair on February 03, 2016, 08:53:46 AM
Wonderful contrast between those fierce leaves and the delicate little flowers!
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on February 04, 2016, 06:20:33 AM
Asphodelus aestivus. In Greek mythology Asphodel Meadows were where the souls of those who were neither good nor evil were sent once they had been judged, hence the majority ended up here.
It's February and note how dry the landscape looks due to the fact that we have had so little rain so far this winter.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Hilary on February 04, 2016, 08:28:42 AM
I am enjoying the photographic evidence of your morning walk
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on February 05, 2016, 06:13:01 AM
I'm glad to hear that, Hilary, thank you.
Not sure what to label the following as because it seems to cause so much discussion as to whether it is 2 distinct species or 2 variants of the same species or whatever. However, I am reliably informed that the latest suggestion to come from the taxonomists is that the autumn-flowering plant should be named Mandragora officinalis and the spring-flowering one M. officinarum.  ??? So, as this is in flower now maybe I should go for the latter? :P
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on February 06, 2016, 06:14:42 AM
There were patches of lovely little Romulea tempskyana scattered among the ruins, often in association with Cyclamen persicum.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on February 07, 2016, 01:54:15 PM
Fleabane, not the most attractive of plants but a commonly occurring one. Phagnalon rupestre subsp. graecum predominates in the south and west of the island while Phagnalon rupestre subsp. rupestre does the same in the east and central areas.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on February 08, 2016, 06:29:50 AM
Helichrysum conglobatum flowering rather earlier than normal I suspect.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on February 09, 2016, 02:37:37 PM
I have run out of photos from my recent morning walks and this one doesn't exactly qualify as when I saw it I was driving out of the village but here goes.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on February 13, 2016, 07:48:34 AM
Yesterday we decided to walk over to the opposite side of the village than usual, to an area that we hadn't explored for some time. Not that many years ago it was all open countryside that had an abundance of flowers in the spring. Now it is full of houses with roads and tracks cut through the once virgin countryside. We did find one area with a few anemones and also some Salvia verbenaca plants clinging on tenaciously by the roadsides.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on February 13, 2016, 04:19:27 PM
Today's walk saw us on the cliffs to the south-west of the island in the area of Petra tou Romiou (Aphrodite's Rock).
We came across this intriguing little tableau. The obvious question is; who, or what, was Antony (without an H) and why does he warrant a grave/shrine on this spot?
More of the flowers that we found tomorrow.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on February 14, 2016, 06:31:58 AM
As promised, with first Prasium majus, common indigenous plant that occurs all around the Med, I believe.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on February 14, 2016, 12:33:53 PM
Breaking in here with news of today's walk. This took us from the road leading down Happy Valley (the whole valley is situated within the British Garrison of Episkopi and serves as the sports complex for the base, with a variety of pitches, athletic tracks, etc) and towards the Monastery of Agios Giorgios. We were amazed by the sheer number of mandrakes that we found, they were everywhere we turned. A few are illustrated below.
On a slightly different note we also found plants of Silene vulgaris (Bladder Campion). These are one of the traditional 'horta' of the island, the young, tender shoots being collected and fried with eggs.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on February 15, 2016, 05:39:46 AM
Back to our clifftop walk and the sign says it all.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on February 16, 2016, 06:07:12 AM
Today we have a Cyprus endemic that we found, Onobrychis venosa.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Joanna Savage on February 16, 2016, 06:38:07 AM
John, that's a beauty.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on February 17, 2016, 05:38:54 AM
Lithodora hispidula subsp versicolor, and yet another mandrake that my wife spotted hiding in the undergrowth.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on February 18, 2016, 05:58:01 AM
The wild thyme still looking very dry due to the lack of rain we have had so far this winter.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on February 27, 2016, 11:29:40 AM
On my customary morning stroll around our property I realized that we don't need to wander far to find a fair number of wildflowers as we have them much closer to home, generally masquerading as 'weeds'.
We start with the dreaded, and dreadful, Oxalis pes-caprae. I know it's a terrible photo but maybe it doesn't deserve any better. >:(
More from tomorrow.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on February 28, 2016, 05:51:19 AM
Erodium malacoides.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on February 29, 2016, 05:59:56 AM
The tiny white flowers of Veronica cymbalaria.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Alisdair on February 29, 2016, 09:43:07 AM
As so often, yet another reason for bending down for a really close look: so many little wild flowers are so rewarding when you get up close. Thanks again, John, I love sharing your morning walks!
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on March 01, 2016, 05:36:01 AM
Bellevalia trifoliata.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on March 02, 2016, 05:47:25 AM
Anchusa azurea syn. A. italica, or vice versa depending on which source you read. ???
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on March 03, 2016, 02:03:41 PM
Lamium moschatum.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on March 04, 2016, 05:21:35 AM
Tragopogon sinuatus.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Joanna Savage on March 04, 2016, 08:15:26 AM
Hello John, Your photos of the local plants are a treat to see. I really like this Tragopogon, it looks as though it would attract a lot of visitors.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on March 04, 2016, 09:35:48 AM
Thank you, Joanna. This particular salsify is very attractive although the flower is quite short lived. They pop up all over our property every year.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on March 05, 2016, 09:05:30 AM
Fumaria judaica.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on March 08, 2016, 02:18:17 PM
Today's was not a morning walk but more of a post-prandial stroll. It took place in the area between the Temple of Apollo Hylates (Apollo of the Woodland) and the ancient Stadium at Kourion.

We start with Sarcopoterium spinosum (Spiny/Prickly Burnet) the stuff that looks dead in the summer, catches at clothing and scratches bare legs as people walk the hillsides.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Joanna Savage on March 08, 2016, 08:01:01 PM
John, this Sarcopoterium is currently a favourite of mine in this garden. It looks good with white flowering Cistus and giant fennel and Asphodel too. Are those seeds on the plant in your photo? Mine have never set seed and live for only a couple of years. It must be way out of its preferred environment, especially today when it has had a coating of snow after a month of rain.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on March 09, 2016, 05:36:52 AM
Joanna, you are pretty well describing the environment that this plant grows in, what is generally thought of as 'impoverished' areas. In many parts it is the dominant species making walking the hills a somewhat tricky and often quite painful business. Those are the fruit which I think are appearing rather earlier than usual, perhaps due to the spells of unseasonably hot weather we've had this winter.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on March 09, 2016, 05:41:18 AM
As Joanna mentioned in her post the Spiny Burnet was accompanied by the white-flowered Cistus salviifolius. While we literally found just a single flower of Cistus creticus the rest having already gone over.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Alisdair on March 09, 2016, 12:27:21 PM
That's incredibly early for Cistus creticus to go over, isn't it? We're going out to Greece later this month and had been hoping to see our cistuses at their peak - should we cancel our trip ???
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on March 09, 2016, 04:15:18 PM
Alisdair, I can only speak for that particular area but when we were there at the end of Feb it was all C. creticus and not a sign of C. salviifolius. Now it's the other way around. I can only blame it on the ridiculous weather pattern we've been experiencing. Normally Feb is the coldest, wettest month of the winter but this year we've had temps in the mid 20s and virtually no rain to speak of. The plants are all confused and are behaving completely out of character. This lunchtime we collected granddaughter from nursery school and drove her home and the external temp gauge in my car was registering 26 degreesC.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Fleur Pavlidis on March 10, 2016, 09:27:59 AM
The fallen petals look very pretty on the ground! in my garden the Cistus monspeliensis is in full flower, the C. creticus just coming out, but up on Hymettos they are all still in bud.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on March 10, 2016, 12:34:21 PM
Phagnalon rupestre subsp graecum.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on March 11, 2016, 05:32:45 AM
Helichrysum conglobatum
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on March 12, 2016, 05:37:58 AM
Pallenis spinosa
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on April 24, 2016, 04:33:24 PM
Our morning walks have taken a back seat recently for one reason and another so today we decided to make up for lost distance, as it were, and do a long one.
We chose one of the Forestry Department Nature Trails that is around 7 kms long. The Artemis Trail (named after the ancient Goddess of Forests) is a circular route round the peak of Chionistra (the highest point on Cyprus at 1,952 metres) and has an average altitude of 1,850 metres.
We were lucky enough to find a few endemics and I will post them here over the coming days.
The first one is Alyssum troodi that is restricted to the Chionistra area (1,200 to 1,950 m), growing on serpentinised ultrabasic rocks.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on April 25, 2016, 05:28:06 AM
Another endemic that is restricted to the Troodos Range, Cephalorrhynchus cypricus, from 800 - 1,950 m. We found this single flower on a hillside that was in shade and so the soil still retained some moisture.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on April 26, 2016, 05:05:10 AM
This one took a bit of identifying. We could not recall ever having seen it either 'in the flesh' or in photos. We checked all our books on wild flowers in Cyprus and the Mediterranean, to no avail. Phone calls and emails during the course of yesterday brought us to the one book we'd omitted to look at, The Red Data Book of the Flora of Cyprus. There it was on page 312.
Orthurus heterocarpus (syn Geum heterocarpum) is not a Cyprus endemic but is restricted to the area around Chionistra (the highest peak in Cyprus) growing in the shade of Juniperus foetidissima and Pinus nigra subsp pallasiana forest at an altitude of 1,700 to 1,950 m. Its population is estimated at around 5,500 and its threat rating is VU (Vulnerable).
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on April 27, 2016, 04:43:50 AM
Another Cyprus endemic, Onosma troodi (Troodos golden-drop) that is restricted to hillsides in the highest reaches of the Troodos Forest (1,500-1,950 m). We feel very fortunate to have stumbled on this single plant as they would appear to be diminishing in numbers.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on April 28, 2016, 04:15:40 AM
Arabis purpurea, another Cyprus endemic restricted to the Troodos Range (400 - 1,800 m).
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on April 29, 2016, 04:59:15 AM
Nepeta troodi, another Cyprus endemic from the higher elevations of the Troodos Range (1,100 - 1,950 m).
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on April 30, 2016, 04:41:41 AM
One more Cyprus endemic that is common in the Troodos Forest (1,200 - 1,700 m).
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on May 01, 2016, 04:51:00 AM
Finally, not an endemic but a plant that grows in the area of Chionistra (900 - 1,950 m).
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on December 11, 2016, 05:54:20 PM
Every November we check the area on the cliff top above the ancient city of Kourion, near the ruins of the Temple of Apollo Hylates (Apollo of the Woodland) for Narcissus serotinus. This November after almost a year without rain we found nothing. Following a few days of heavy rain last week we decided to take a look this morning and this is a small example of what we found.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Alisdair on December 12, 2016, 10:19:00 AM
That's very reassuring, John! When we were in Greece in November we expect to find N. obsoletus flowering as usual in our garden but there was absolutely no sign. Maybe they were simply waiting for some more serious rain, too.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on January 01, 2017, 12:12:50 PM
On our New Year's Day morning walk today we decided to take a look at the area around the Akrotiri Salt Lake, in particular the Fasouri Marsh Wetlands. The salt lake itself appears to be filling nicely, with several flocks of wading birds in the distance (unfortunately forgot to put the binos in the car). A large area of the wetlands has recently been enclosed by a sturdy pole fence, in an attempt to combat illegal fly-tipping, etc. Not much to be seen in the way of flowers as yet although the December rains have begun to bring forth new foliage. The sun shining through the massed groupings of Phragmites australis was a pleasant sight though.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on January 03, 2017, 10:52:44 AM
Not exactly a morning walk today but a resumption of our usual morning stroll around the property, something we have not been able to do for about a week due to the heavy rain, thunder storms and resulting waterlogged ground. Following the long, hot, dry summer, and autumn, winter has eventually arrived with a vengeance, as they say. Whilst assessing any possible damage I found that one or two plants have begun to take advantage of the conditions, especially the fact that the sun has reappeared, to attempt to flower. Below are just 3 of them that I snapped this morning.
Correa backhouseana
Cestrum roseum
Jasminum mesnyi
  
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on January 13, 2017, 10:49:15 AM
Today's morning walk took me down to the Wetlands around the Akrotiri Salt Lake to see what impact the recent heavy rains have had on the area. Nothing spectacular to record botanically but looking inland towards the Troodos massif there's snow on the tops.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on January 29, 2017, 03:58:59 PM
Today's walk was an afternoon one, the Australian Open tennis has a lot to answer for! It was bright and sunny but with a chill breeze blowing. We didn't venture far therefore, just up onto the cliffs above the beach at Kourion, in the area near the ruins of the Ancient Greek Stadium. Not many flowers out as yet but I did get these pictures of Romulea tempskyana and Anemone coronaria.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on February 05, 2017, 07:21:29 AM
For a variety of reasons yesterday's walk turned into an afternoon one. A few days ago we had spotted a sign on the Kourion clifftop about a newly created Nature Walk so decided to give it a try. It was marked as 4km but as we progressed the sky began to look a little threatening and, with the number of photo stops and other distractions, time was passing so we turned at the halfway mark and returned to the car. Still that 4km had taken around an hour and a half. We'll do the other half another day when we have time for the full 8km.
The number of anemones we came across was amazing, whole swathes of them everywhere. The photos really don't do them justice.
In one spot we found a fairly close grouping of mandrakes, they were amazing, yuge. (Sorry!). The size can be seen compared to my wife's hand.
The others are Ecballium elaterium, Asphodelus aestivus, Fagonia cretica and what I think is Dianthus strictus but if it is then it's extremely early.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on February 05, 2017, 02:53:15 PM
Today's walk was more of a late morning/midday one. We decided to visit an area we hadn't been to for a while, Paramali. We parked the car under a flyover of the Limassol/Paphos highway intending to take a nearby rough dirt track only to find that it had been scraped and widened recently. The first photo shows some rather dusty plants that narrowly escaped the destruction. Basically all we found of any note were a few ancient olive trees, as in the next 3 photos.
Having abandoned our initial intention we headed for the ruins of Kourion where we have a friendly relationship with the custodians in the ticket office.
Here Romulea and Cyclamen were out in abundance, photos 5 & 6. As I was concentrating on getting photo 7 lined up (a rather unusual looking cyclamen) a snake appeared from under a pile of stones, shot between my feet and disappeared into a bush. I barely had time to register that it was black and therefore a Whip snake and non-venomous, and not before my heart rate had gone up a few notches.
Photo 8 is one of the earliest orchids to flower, Orchis collina. No. 9 is Bellis sylvestris no.10 showing its pink reverse side.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Fleur Pavlidis on February 06, 2017, 09:42:41 PM
You should have had JTh's husband with you. He'd have put your snake in a plastic box!
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: JTh on February 07, 2017, 10:50:01 AM
John and Fleur, a small correction: he catches snakes only if they are inside our house, for instance in our bedroom.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on February 07, 2017, 03:13:23 PM
Not a morning walk but an afternoon walk with a set purpose. To get photographic evidence to support my wife when she takes part in the village environmental committee's meeting this evening.
The Kouris was a seasonal river that ran through Kolossi until it was dammed in the 1980s. The first 2 photos are from the 1960s when it could be quite powerful in spate. In fact in the winter of 1967 it washed away the Queen's Bridge in the British Sovereign Base Area and the Royal Engineers had to construct a Bailey bridge until the river went down in the summer and it could be repaired. However, following the building of the dam the water ceased to flow and the remaining photos show how the river bed looks today.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: JTh on February 07, 2017, 03:31:02 PM
Not much of an improvement,at least not from an aesthetic point of veiew.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Charithea on February 08, 2017, 11:46:12 AM
Hi Jorun. It does look sad that the 'mighty' Kouris of my childhood,  which really looked amazing after the spring snow melt, is now a dumping ground for 'uncaring' individuals. The riverbed has been cleaned many times but unfortunately the dumping has not stopped. The last 5 years my concerns have been unheeded but now with the new village council leader, a much younger man, there is hope for change.  I was invited by the committee to speak at last evening's gathering regarding setting up groups for the improvement of the village. I have been informed that my impassioned speech has gathered the most volunteers. I now have to organize them and I shall post our 'news' as they come along.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: JTh on February 08, 2017, 05:30:55 PM
Great, Charitea, I hope you succeed.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on February 20, 2017, 11:31:00 AM
Test
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: David Dickinson on February 21, 2017, 12:53:36 AM
I see that a "test" message has been sent. There does seem to be a problem here because I wrote a message of support to Charithea which isn't showing up.

Hope everything went well, Charithea. Great work you are doing!
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on February 21, 2017, 05:59:38 AM
I sent the test message as I was unable to access the forum for a few days and then when it returned I couldn't post photos, and still cannot post photos.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Hilary on February 21, 2017, 08:25:45 AM
hereistay seems to have got the thing to work.
I wonder if it is the time of day or the size of the photos.
Title: Re: Photo problem
Post by: Alisdair on February 21, 2017, 10:14:09 AM
As some of you will have noticed the site went offline altogether over the weekend. Our administrator had to put a lot of work into getting it back in action, but succeeded. However, as John has found there is a problem with photos. I've been experimenting myself, and it seems that Hilary is right - the problem is to do with size. I managed to post any photo successfully so long as the file was under 130kb in size (including multiple photos, so long as each individually was under that size), but failed with any photo over that size.
I have alerted the administrator to this, but in the meantime if you do want to post photos please try to keep them to the very smallest file size you can manage, and definitely under 130kb. If you try but get an error message, try again deleting the first attempt and using a smaller file size.
I'm very sorry about the difficulties, and hope we can sort them out as soon as possible.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Joanna Savage on February 21, 2017, 11:00:55 AM
Testing with Hermodactylus  tuberosus photo, flowering this morning.
Title: Re: Photo problem solved
Post by: Alisdair on February 21, 2017, 11:34:14 AM
The administrator says the site should now be accepting photos properly again. I've tested it with photos right up to the usual 250kb limit and it worked perfectly for me, so I hope it does for you.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on February 21, 2017, 12:26:30 PM
Here goes with the photos I tried several times to post. They were taken on a cold, clear, sharp morning. The Loropetalum chinense is in full bloom and the Arbutus andrachne is showing why it is in the Ericaceae family with its heather-like flowers.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Alisdair on February 21, 2017, 01:48:23 PM
Thanks for persevering, John; they're lovely pictures!
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on February 28, 2017, 10:37:05 AM
This morning we awoke to a Blues day. Not, I hasten to add, a reflection of our mood but the sight that greeted us as we walked outside.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Umbrian on March 01, 2017, 07:22:58 AM
Lovely selection of photographs John. At the moment I just have a few Scillas coming into bloom but am cheered each morning by various Narcissus providing " sunshine" even on the greyest of days. A lovely time of year when each day promises something new.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on March 01, 2017, 10:17:05 AM
Thank you, Carole. We haven't had a quiz post for a while so how about getting back into the swing with an easy one? How many of the plants in my last post can you identify?
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Umbrian on March 02, 2017, 08:55:44 AM
Felt I had to rise to the challenge John but am ashamed to say I haven't done too well.....
1 Vinca
2, 3, 4. ?
5 Salvia discolor ( now?)
6 Lavender stoechas
7 Rosemary
8?
9 Violet
Must get my little grey cells out of winter hibernation.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on March 02, 2017, 09:54:16 AM
I'll give you the first one as Vinca major. The Salvia discolor has been flowering almost all winter. You skipped one between the salvia and the lavender, the small blue flower. Rosemary, yes and Viola odorata. I have to confess to cheating a bit as a couple of them are wildflowers.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on March 02, 2017, 12:26:32 PM
Taking inspiration from Umbrian's mention of flowers that provide 'sunshine' I decided to take a sort of inventory of our current cheerful blooms. Although I have to admit to a bit of poetic license with the last one as it is stretching it a little to call it yellow.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Umbrian on March 02, 2017, 12:27:39 PM
Have just returned from my weekly visit to our local market where I saw plants for sale that were no 2 - needless to say the vendor had no idea what they were - imported by "looks" from Holland I would think. Anyway I had a sudden brain surge and wonder if it is a type of Clerodendrum? How hardy is it?
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on March 02, 2017, 05:08:14 PM
I assume you mean No 2 on the blue, Carole. It's an Australian native Hardenbergia violaceae, a fast growing, scrambling climber that is described as; moderately drought tolerant; frost tolerant 0 to -5 degrees C; sensitive to water logged soil; prefers full sun or partial shade. Hope this helps.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Umbrian on March 03, 2017, 10:07:28 AM
Thanks for the info re Hardenbergia John - might give it a try.
Hope some other ' Forumers' take uo the challenge for the yellow flowers. I struggled with some again but it definitely helped my winter dormant brain get into gardening mode again.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Hilary on March 03, 2017, 02:05:04 PM
Yellow flower, morning walk
One of them is Brugmansia
Either people are still hibernating, or don't recognise any of the yellow flowers or know them all
Here is a Brugmansia seen growing in a small patio at the Alhambra, Granada.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on March 03, 2017, 05:48:24 PM
You are certainly correct about the flower, Hilary, as for the rest of your comments, who knows?
Staying with the colour theme, today I went for white.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Hilary on March 04, 2017, 08:27:46 AM
Crassula ovata
A very useful plant which surprisingly didn't come to any harm during the cold snap.
Photo taken Februry 2016
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Hilary on March 04, 2017, 08:33:35 AM
Iris germanica
Photo taken one April in Mystra, Greece
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Joanna Savage on March 04, 2017, 01:07:09 PM
Hello John here's my two bobs'worth , but I'll have to do it colour by colour , there is far too much to remember all together. So for the blues i think there is a Cerinthe and a Tassel Hyacinth, lampascioni which are delicious to eat. In fact I think it is Muscari
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Joanna Savage on March 04, 2017, 01:10:26 PM
For the yellows, might the first be Thevetia, Yellow oleander? Then an Alamanda, and perhaps a Tree Medicago and the last is a Cymbidium orchid. The various daisy types are thoroughly confusing.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Joanna Savage on March 04, 2017, 01:11:38 PM
Yellow. I missed Black Eyed Suzy, a Thunbergia.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Joanna Savage on March 04, 2017, 01:13:34 PM
For the whites, lantana, pelargonium, rose , viburnum tinus and an arum or calla.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on March 04, 2017, 05:28:48 PM
Gosh, lets take these one at a time. Hilary, Crassula ovata and Iris germanica are both correct.
Joanna, no Cerinthe I'm afraid and the 'tassel hyacinth' is a Bellevalia trifoliata..
In the yellows, not a yellow oleander but an Eremophila maculata "Aurea". No to alamanda, yes to Medicago arborea and the orchid, also to the Thunbergia alata.
The whites, no pelargoniums but yes to Lantana camara, Viburnum tinus, Zantedeschia aethiopica and the rose is Rosa banksiae "Flore Pleno".
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on March 04, 2017, 05:39:50 PM
This morning the dominant sense was not sight but sound. The sound of the birds singing merrily in the trees, and the sound of the bees busily working the blossom on our plum trees.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: David Dickinson on March 05, 2017, 12:30:43 AM
Hi Hilary,

I don't know how cold it got for you but here in Rome none of my Crassula ovata survived intact. All of them were well-grown, mature specimens, one of them I had had for around 15 years. One lost all growth but the trunk is solid and may resprout. Another lost the right hand side and a third was badly damaged in the centre. Let's see what happens now that we are (were until today!) having spring weather.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: David Dickinson on March 05, 2017, 12:44:41 AM
Hi Umbrian

Re Hardenbergia. Mine survived the cold of this winter but the foliage took a real battering. It is now coming into flower so, at least some of the flower buds survived the sub-zero temperatures. Needless to say, seeing the photo, mine is a white version. The photo is not very clear but what seems like a yellow spot on the petals is, in fact, green
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on March 05, 2017, 08:49:24 AM
Today I went for the, for want of a better word, fiery colours.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Umbrian on March 05, 2017, 08:57:18 AM
Happy to see more people taking an interest in naming the flower photos John is posting. Amazing how names can escape one and I have to agree Joanna - the Daisy type always confuse me although I should remember the  yellow one with very ferny/cut leaves.....
Some recent very warm weather has found the birds that frequent our garden more intent on building nests and singing to attract a mate ( or keep one already found interested) than feeding. In the winter they are waiting for me to put out food but now it of less interest. The blackbirds are forgiven for the mess they cause, when frantically digging for worms and bugs, with their beautiful singing especially in the early evening. I do miss the presence of my friendly Robin though who, throughout the winter is never many feet away from me when I am working and helps cheer the bleakest of days. Gardening has more rewards than successfully grown plants.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Umbrian on March 05, 2017, 09:19:06 AM
Thanks for that David- will give the Hardenbergia a try I think - it is so pretty. As regards Italy, this winter has seen some of the coldest weather for quite a few years as I am sure you will agree and so if yours survived it is a good omen. My small garden in town is more sheltered than the one in the country, at a higher altitude, and I am still looking for new subjects for it and feel I can be more adventurous.
Not surprisingly, my Mimosa in town is in full bloom whilst the one in the country is still in tight bud......but it has come through unscathed and large specimens in the area have been known to succumb after more prolonged spells of low temperatures in some winters. Taking a few chances is always worthwhile I think.
The bees certainly appreciate the Mimosa and there are even a few butterflies about.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Umbrian on March 05, 2017, 09:39:15 AM
The fiery colours seem to have woken me up John and I think I have done better today....
Papaver
Rose
Kalanchoe
Nasturtium
Salvia ( but which one?)
Weigela
Marigold
Rose (rubifolia?)
Leonotis

The penultimate one escapes me although I have one struggling in the garden that somebody bought me last year .......label lost!
Good fun though keep up the good work. :)
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on March 05, 2017, 05:25:47 PM
Ok, lets go through the ones we haven't identified colour by colour.
Blue:- No. 4 Salvia farinacea; No. 6 Anchusa azurea; No. 9 Plectranthus neochilus.
Yellow:-  No. 2 Chrysanthemoides incana; No. 3 Jasminum mesnyi; No. 4 Osteospermum sp.; No.5 Euryops pectinata; No. 7 Senecio angulatus.
White:-  No. 3 Eruca sativa (Rocket); No. 5 Lamium moschatum.
Fiery:-  (I'll give you 6 out of 10, Carole); No. 1 Papaver rhoeas; No. 2 Damask Rose; No. 3 Kalanchoe blossfeldiana; No. 4 Nasturtium; No. 5 Eremophila glabra; No. 6 Cestrum roseum; No. 7 Calendula officinalis; No. 8 Rosa mutabilis; No. 9 Loropetalum chinense; No. 10 Tecoma capensis.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Umbrian on March 06, 2017, 08:40:28 AM
Thanks for identifying the plants in 'photos John. With some I said " Oh, of course" but others were new to me. It is amazing to see how many subjects you have in flower whilst here I am awaiting the spring explosion. Some warm sunny days have seen things on the move however. In the meantime I am enjoying the winter flowering shrubs- and their perfume in many cases, plus bulbs and a sudden profusion of violets.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on March 06, 2017, 03:30:39 PM
Yesterday (Sunday) we decided it was time we began to seriously consider getting into shape in readiness for our upcoming MGS trip to Sardinia, so we went for a rather longer walk than normal, approx. 10 km. Not all on the level I hasten to add but down into a valley on the inland side of the Kourion cliffs and up the other side, some quite steep walking involved, and same again in reverse of course in order to get back to the car. Also practiced taking photos on the way. See below: Firstly a Field of asphodels. In Ancient Greek mythology this was where ordinary souls ended up, the ones that hadn't committed any serious crimes or done anything exceptional to allow them to gain admission to the Elysian Fields. Basically it was for those boring individuals who didn't belong elsewhere in the Underworld.
Echium angustifolium; Hypecoum imberbe; Prasium majus; Cistus creticus; Thymelaea hirsuta; Cyclamen persicum.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Joanna Savage on March 08, 2017, 09:19:12 AM
John, that field of asphodel is really lovely. Once again I wonder why I garden, nature does it so well. Is Asphodel an indicator of poor soils, or maybe it is to be found in overgrazed pastures?
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on March 08, 2017, 11:26:46 AM
Joanna, that is only a very small section of one area that was covered in these plants, the photo really doesn't do them justice. They grow all over, on rocky ground, garigue, pasture land. They have an advantage over most other plants in that grazing animals won't touch them so they can increase in vast numbers with little or no competition.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on March 14, 2017, 10:32:51 AM
Set off this morning with the intention of tracking down the location of a Herb Farm that I had heard rumours of. Unfortunately, when I found it it was a disappointment. However, I did stumble on a track that has been created in the vicinity of a village that is one of the last remaining strongholds of the once major carob industry in Cyprus. It claims to take the walker on a tour of abandoned carob plantations and resurrected areas among other agricultural disciplines (see board in the photo). This will need further investigation when I have more time. I tried to take a few photos of plants I spotted from the car but the stiff breeze made focusing difficult as they swayed around. I have posted a couple; Himantoglossum robertianum and Tordylium aegyptiacum.
Following the return of the forum I was reviewing former posts and realized that I had mentioned a board in a photo and then not posted the photo, so here it is.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on March 26, 2017, 11:08:09 AM
In response to Joanna's post on a different thread regarding spring photos, we have a patch of native Papaver hybridum that have appeared in an area of our garden/field this year.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on March 31, 2017, 12:56:51 PM
A few more photos that were taken today.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on April 20, 2017, 06:28:15 AM
Arrived back last night after 2 weeks away and was greeted by a display of roses this morning.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Alisdair on April 20, 2017, 09:06:27 AM
Beautiful, John - I can almost smell them!
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on April 23, 2017, 09:51:05 AM
On opening the blinds this morning was greeted by a mass of flowers on one of our Epiphyllums.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on April 28, 2017, 09:03:13 AM
An Ornithogalum arabicum has opened in time for us to see it before we leave to join the MGS trip to Sardinia.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on April 29, 2017, 06:48:27 AM
This morning's walk was a little different. It followed a telephone call from the leader of the village council saying that a public area of the village that we had recently planted up had been vandalized. The previous administration had planted this area, a long, thin, raised strip of land, with a double row of standard roses. These required constant watering and only flowered intermittently for a brief period, the remainder of the time looking decidedly tatty. The new council asked us to submit a plan to improve the site. I suggested a row of Pittosporum tobira at the back, these could be kept trimmed and would provide scent when in flower. Teucrium fruticans were placed at intervals in front of this with prostrate rosemary as ground cover and to soften the retaining wall by trailing over. This was accepted and carried out. The plants were establishing nicely until this morning it was discovered that overnight someone had pulled them all out and thrown them into the road below. We have just returned from attempting to rescue as many as possible and repair some of the damage. Thankfully we are off soon to spend a week in the company of plant-loving colleagues and friends and, hopefully, restore our faith in humanity.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Hilary on April 29, 2017, 07:33:41 AM
shockimg
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Fleur Pavlidis on April 30, 2017, 06:52:57 AM
That's really dispiriting John. May I make a suggestion which could save this or other plantings from vandalism? Add in some roses which don't need a lot of water and are repeat flowerers. Nearly everyone has a soft spot for roses and would hesitate to destroy them, and they have useful thorns for protection. The flowers may get picked for wreaths on 1st May but even that can be avoided if you find short stemmed flowers. I have lots in the garden - all nameless but tough as old boots and a joy for much of the year. Many of them are from Sparoza. I'll take you some cuttings!
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Umbrian on April 30, 2017, 07:46:05 AM
So disappointing John - why do people do such pointless things?  I can imagine how frustrated you must feel.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Umbrian on April 30, 2017, 08:20:24 AM
I was recently asked to help with a project that our local council was planning. An area in the village was to be planted with the help of the children from the small school who would do some work on the plants chosen. My job was to advise on suitable plants. The initial meeting of all parties was at the end of last year and I heard nothing more until about two weeks before the 'grand inauguration ' of the project. I had given thought obviously to what should feature, plants native to our area that would be interesting for the children to study for their long culinary and medicinal properties. However on revisiting the sight I discovered that no preparation had been been done. As the area was quite large I suggested we concentrate on a small part of it, do that well and continue as and when time permitted. Workmen were sent to clear the chosen area but only did a surface job.....the trailing roots of couch grass still investing the soil only centimetres down. I complained and the work was redone but only marginally better. With the date fast approaching for the inauguration I had to go ahead and so one hot, sunny morning I found myself trying to oversee the planting with the " help" of about 30 young children, ages ranging from four years to ten/ eleven. Needless to say it was rather chaotic and when the children returned to school I had to set about replanting every plant.....I had shown them how to tease out the roots, mix some compost with the soil when they had made a hole sufficiently big enough etc but once let loose on the work my advice had little impact.  I made sure the plants were well watered in the days running up to the inauguration which went well apparently ( I was unable to attend). I have heard nothing since and doubt if the ambitious plan to cultivate a much greater area will go ahead now they realise how much work is involved. The school is keen to participate and I am only too pleased to be involved but the whole experience has left me a little dispirited too.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on May 10, 2017, 08:39:14 AM
This year's Hollyhocks and a Delphinium staphisagria.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on May 13, 2017, 10:26:37 AM
Following on from the postings of a few days ago about the planting up of public areas in the village. This morning we spent around 4 hours planting a slope outside one of the churches in the village in an attempt to prevent the annual soil erosion caused by winter rains. This church is in an area of the village that was created when refugees from the north of the island were forced to seek refuge in the south following the troubles of 1974. The church was built as a temporary place of worship and has been replaced by a permanent structure. The plan now is to demolish the old building (it contains asbestos so this will be a specialist operation) and create an open air meeting place for the celebration of weddings, christenings, etc. The stabilizing of the slope and improving its look is the first stage in this process. MGS member and good friend, Yiannos Orphanos, is responsible for the design, provision of plants and initial labour, along with volunteers from the village. 
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Alisdair on May 13, 2017, 12:33:25 PM
Wow, that's quite an undertaking, John!
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on June 01, 2017, 07:42:19 AM
Back to a more conventional morning walk today, coffee in one hand, camera in the other. 8)
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Alisdair on June 01, 2017, 07:54:01 AM
John, Helena looking over my shoulder says it's crazy we didn't visit your lovely garden when the MGS had its AGM on Cyprus!!
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on June 01, 2017, 04:07:22 PM
Alisdair and Helena, thanks for the compliment both. As the organizer of the 2009 AGM in Cyprus I didn't feel that our garden was of a sufficiently high standard to be included on the itinerary, apart from the fact that it would have been difficult to fit it into any of the routes taken to other venues. I feel that our garden is rather unconventional compared to what others expect when they visit it. It doesn't fit into any particular type or style, it isn't all tidy with neatly laid out paths and beds of disciplined plants, all colour matched. We experiment with plants and their growing conditions, a lot of things are self sown and as long as they are reasonably behaved they are allowed to remain in situ. Any sign of bullying or taking up more than their fair share of space and they're evicted.
I do apologise for not having invited anyone around on one of the free evenings, however, and can only plead that it was driven out of my head by having to ensure that the following day's programme was in place and all ready to go.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: David Dickinson on June 02, 2017, 02:35:20 AM
Sounds just like the garden I would pay through the nose to visit! :)

As an aside, as I wrote the above I thought to myself "paying through the nose" must have origins in snobbery and "looking down your nose" etc. Therefore, paying a high price because cost was of no consideration. According to the Telegraph I was wrong. They say ""paying through the nose" was a Viking punishment of slitting the nose from tip to eyebrow of anyone who refused to pay tax".
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on June 02, 2017, 04:40:55 PM
David, if you're ever in Cyprus you are welcome to visit free of charge.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on June 04, 2017, 07:38:43 AM
A few photos from this morning's walk.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Fleur Pavlidis on June 05, 2017, 08:18:47 PM
One Joynes does the planting and the other takes the photos?
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on June 06, 2017, 03:50:57 PM
Just what are you implying, Kyria Pavlidi?
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Charithea on June 07, 2017, 02:10:32 PM
I don't want a war to start so here are some photos where JJ is actually planting. The two Yannides (Yiannos Orphanos and John J) working on the Ayios Antreas  church garden project. We have enlisted the help of the people living near the area as 'garden vigilantes'. So far so good. The pants are thriving.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Charithea on June 07, 2017, 02:44:02 PM
You might recall the photos posted on the 7th Feb showing the horrible sight of the Kouris River Bed. It was discovered that it was not our village's responsibility.It comes under the jurisdiction of the three neighbouring villages.  However, the New Environmental Committee  decided to take action and had the burnable stuff burnt on the Easter Bonfire.  Now discussions are taking place with the ' responsible' villages to clear up the rest. I hope sometime soon to post a photo of a cleaned up river bed.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on June 08, 2017, 08:02:07 AM
A few photos from this morning's walk around the garden, before I got down to planting a couple of Sideritis cypria we found in the Forestry Department nursery at Platania yesterday. We had called in to investigate the possibility of the Forestry Department assisting the village in our renovation of its environs by providing plants either at a discounted rate or, preferably, free of charge. Will post the outcome at a later date.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Charithea on June 21, 2017, 09:26:33 AM
Walking around the village is getting more pleasant with the re- planting and the cleaning of its surrounds. Watering the newly 'planted' (March - April) areas is also becoming easier with the placing of drip irrigation.  Before this it was a matter of going round with buckets every few days to keep the plants from dying. I am posting some photos to show the progress.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Fleur Pavlidis on June 21, 2017, 10:31:07 PM
I understand John was on his knees in the churchyard on Sunday. If he was seeking help from the old Greek gods then here are a few who might assist:
Demeter: Goddess of agriculture, fertility, sacred law and the harvest.
Attis: A minor god of vegetation, fruits of the earth and rebirth.
Antheia: Goddess of gardens, flowers, swamps, and marshes.

From  https://greekgodsandgoddesses.net/ (https://greekgodsandgoddesses.net/)
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on July 02, 2017, 07:33:31 AM
The temperature here has rocketed into the low 40 degrees C over the past week making working, and even walking, in the garden very uncomfortable. This morning I did get a couple of shots early before the sun burnt off the flowers. One is of the Rosa moschata and the other Oenothera biennis reflecting the rising sun.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on July 03, 2017, 06:16:20 AM
A Commelina doing its best to match the colour of the morning sky.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on July 06, 2017, 03:54:16 PM
Stretching today's morning walk a bit, both metaphorically and physically. It took place in a village high on the Troodos massif. In the first photo I was too far away on the other side of the valley to tell whether or not the green roof was natural or fake. The second photo is aimed at my former colleagues on the MGS AC and may strike a chord with them.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on July 29, 2017, 07:38:00 AM
Haven't posted much on morning walks for a while but with the current weather conditions it's probably the most strenuous activity possible. Today I decided to take a few photos of the plants that were still flowering despite the extended period of
intense, 40+C, temperatures we have been experiencing for much of June and July.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on July 29, 2017, 07:42:49 AM
And a few more.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on September 04, 2017, 06:17:49 AM
Today's morning walk resulted in a couple of surprises. This year has been a strange one so far but I did not expect to see the flowers featured in the first 2 photos yet. The lilac usually only flowers around Easter. The Tecoma stans and its cultivar 'Orange Jubilee' help to brighten up the day, while our white buddleja has flowered all through the summer. The fruit of the Eleagnus angustifolia are beginning to ripen although they are an acquired taste that I have never acquired.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on October 03, 2017, 05:51:09 PM
Not a morning walk but I took a detour while driving to the shop this morning to go past the church that features in a post from June 07 on this thread. I wanted to see how the plants that we had put in to stabilise the slope outside the church were doing. I took a couple of shots, not brilliant but give some idea of how they are doing the job that they were intended for.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Alisdair on October 03, 2017, 06:10:34 PM
It looks as if it's working really well, John
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on October 05, 2017, 07:56:29 AM
One of our Passion flowers has decided to suddenly spring into life.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on October 08, 2017, 08:41:40 AM
No real rain in our part of the island as yet but we decided to take a walk this morning in the area of the Akrotiri Marshes and Salt Lake to see if there was any sign of new life appearing. All very dry and nothing really stirring but we did come across the tree in the photo below which was a bit disappointing. The tree is Cordia myxa and although I believe the fruit are edible, never tried them so can neither confirm nor deny, they are usually used here to make the glue that poachers coat glue sticks with for catching small songbirds.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on October 08, 2017, 10:33:08 AM
My previous post was not quite accurate we did find this rather stunted thistle, bravely hanging in there.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Umbrian on October 09, 2017, 02:19:56 PM
Pity the Cordia is managing to survive and produce fruits if they are used in the way you described John.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on October 09, 2017, 05:47:21 PM
Unfortunately using lime sticks and mist nets to catch small songbirds for pickling, although illegal, is a lucrative occupation. The main excuse used to justify it is; "It's part of our culture". We even had a Member of Parliament who used to boast about how many he could eat at a sitting.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on October 22, 2017, 12:45:08 PM
Not a morning walk but a morning drive, yesterday, to a couple of places that are, shall we say, a little out of the ordinary when it comes to the plants they grow.
The first photo is of a Podranea ricasoliana being grown almost as a standard at the entrance to a family run nursery.
Two is a very large Litchi chinensis in the same nursery.
Three is in a different establishment, one that specialises in extremely unusual plants, many of which I have never seen growing anywhere else on the island. This is Ziziphus mauritiana.
Four is Diospyros nigra, the chocolate pudding fruit tree.
Five is Petrea volubilis, a plant I first encountered on the MGS AGM in Mallorca.
Six is a real teaser. I was tempted to use it in the What is it? thread. Maybe we could have a mini test here before I say what it is. Any takers?
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on October 23, 2017, 05:20:46 PM
The last photo on the above post is of a vine, Momordica cochinchinensis. No wonder that locally this has been reduced to Gac fruit.
The name Momordica comes from the Latin, to bite. Apparently the seeds appear to have been bitten. I cannot confirm this as I have never seen them.
The cochinchinensis refers to the area of South Vietnam that once went under the name of Cochinchina. Gac is derived from the Vietnamese word for the fruit.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on November 02, 2017, 07:01:22 PM
Not a morning walk but a late afternoon stroll. Following an intensive few days picking olives (not an easy task at our advancing ages) we felt the need to stretch the legs and take in some cool evening air. So we decided to take a look at the clifftop above Kourion to see if the recent short rain showers had brought forth any life. The answer was not a lot but we did find a few Narcissus serotinus and Ranunculus bullatus.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on November 04, 2017, 11:15:05 AM
Again not a morning walk but a quick trip to a local hardware store to collect a couple of small items when I spotted the following sign. They are really beginning to branch out I thought. It was a bit early for a drink but I couldn't find the bar anyway so that solved that dilemma.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on November 14, 2017, 08:20:42 AM
Just a few of the plants that were in flower on this morning's stroll.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on November 16, 2017, 08:27:10 AM
Our Rosa moschata is beginning to make its grand entrance.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on November 17, 2017, 10:05:09 AM
Although we have had virtually no rain so far this season, and certainly nothing like the catastrophic downpours that have caused such devastation in Greece, the narcissus are beginning to make their annual appearance. I never cease to be amazed by how such delicate plants can punch their way through the hardest of surfaces, even in areas frequented by vehicles belonging to 'hunters'.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Fleur Pavlidis on November 19, 2017, 07:17:03 PM
A group of non-gardeners at Sparoza last week remained unimpressed by a drift of Narcissus serotinus in 'Derek's garden'. Weird people.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on November 30, 2017, 08:56:35 AM
A couple of the flowers that caught my eye as I went out to work in the garden this morning.
Also, on the Sparoza thread I mentioned a project that my wife is involved in. Along with a group of other villagers, she is helping to produce items to be used as prizes in a raffle in order to raise money to pay towards creating a garden on neglected land adjacent to the main village church. So, at the moment the seating area outside our kitchen door has been taken over as a workspace. I shudder to think what the meeting room at the church looks like with several people all working on different projects.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on December 13, 2017, 09:47:37 AM
Our two Brugmansia are beginning to put on a show. The Thunbergia alata and T. grandiflora are hanging in there too.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Charithea on February 07, 2018, 11:15:26 AM
I took a walk this morning with my 6 year old granddaughter to see the dam.  We took pictures of the surroundings and the river bed.  As you can see there is very little water running. It is February, supposedly the coldest and wettest  month of the year, but we have brilliant sunshine.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Alisdair on February 08, 2018, 09:15:52 AM
Deeply worrying!
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on February 13, 2018, 12:03:57 PM
In the dim and distant past a previous administration obviously thought it would be a good idea to erect a small fountain at the entrance to the village. I can't recall it ever working, or even being connected to a water supply. Anyway, the current administration put it on the list of items that required improving in some aspect. So, I planted it up with Ruschia pulvinaius a tough little plant that will survive a certain amount of abuse, including infrequent watering. In bloom it is covered in tiny, pink, daisy-like flowers. It is doing what I had hoped and cascading over the rim of the trough while adding a soft, green touch to what I consider to be a rather ugly introduction to the village.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Fleur Pavlidis on February 14, 2018, 07:30:17 AM
What a happy lion. I think it would cheer me up every time I walked past it. Thoughtful planting too.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Alisdair on February 14, 2018, 08:52:31 AM
What a lovely idea, John. How long ago did you plant it?
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on February 14, 2018, 09:07:44 AM
I planted it up in March of last year, Alisdair.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on February 14, 2018, 12:58:25 PM
It seems that the current village administration is of the same opinion as myself regarding the lion fountain. As we were driving out of the village around lunchtime we saw the foreman of the maintenance workers and he was scoping out a new, less prominent location to move Fleur's happy lion to. Possibly end up outside one of the village's lesser churches.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on February 15, 2018, 11:37:59 AM
Not a great photo but perhaps gives some idea of the Ruschia in flower.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on February 16, 2018, 10:27:53 AM
Yellow - the colour of Spring.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on February 24, 2018, 09:10:33 AM
Just a few random photos taken this morning, no particular theme in mind.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on March 04, 2018, 08:59:09 AM
Today's morning walk provided a few photos, including one showing that it's apple blossom time.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Alisdair on March 04, 2018, 09:17:50 AM
Thanks for taking us on this gorgeous walk, John - I can almost smell that apple blossom!
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on March 04, 2018, 10:23:01 AM
I missed it on my early morning bimble but our tiny Coronilla valentina has flowered for the first time.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Umbrian on March 05, 2018, 07:40:40 AM
What a beautiful flower John and you have captured it perfectly. Such an intricate design and it reminds us to look more closely at times to really appreciate the wonderful diversity of flowers.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on March 08, 2018, 10:26:22 AM
It's jasmine time and the scent is amazing, while our 3 different Angel's Trumpets open to greet the new day.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Alisdair on March 09, 2018, 08:00:48 AM
Wow, John! Weird coincidence, before I'd seen your posting I'd put an angel's trumpet as today's picture on the cover of the MGS Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/mediterraneangardensociety).
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on March 10, 2018, 10:47:18 AM
Possibly because of the shortage of rain this winter our Damask Roses have been late to open.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on March 13, 2018, 08:06:47 AM
I am not a great aficionado of cactus and succulents but I realised that I have been neglecting to feature some of the ones that we do have.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on March 14, 2018, 09:14:18 AM
This morning it was great to see the first Dietes flower of the year.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on March 15, 2018, 10:33:11 AM
On today's walk I was pleased to see the first of the wild Sword lilies (Gladiolus italicus) beginning to open in parts of our garden. These were once used to decorate Christ's tomb on Good Friday, perhaps due to the fact that they were believed by some to be one of the lilies of the field mentioned in the Gospels. I was less pleased, however, to see one flower being devoured by a caterpillar. Anyone recognise the culprit?
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on March 17, 2018, 09:35:10 AM
I asked this same question on a Facebook group, Bulbs in Habitat, and so far the only comment I've received is that it is probably one of thousands of Hawk Moths.
A second comment a few days later suggested the Humming Bird Hawk Moth.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on March 18, 2018, 09:06:25 AM
A little hazy and overcast today, whether due to cloud or dust in the atmosphere is unclear.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on March 19, 2018, 08:04:40 AM
This morning's walk concentrates on the Hibiscus flowers growing in our western boundary hedge.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Umbrian on March 19, 2018, 08:41:54 AM
Always sad John when visiting old haunts that have suffered from increasing urbanisation. I remember my disappointment as a child when the flood meadows on the edge of our town were drained and a large housing estate built. No more spring walks to admire the Lady's Smocks and Marsh Marigolds, particularly enjoyable for me sloshing about in wellington boots.....
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on March 21, 2018, 08:13:47 AM
I'd love to be sloshing about in wellies, Carole, but with daytime temps already climbing into the mid-20s C everyone is looking out their shorts and T shirts here. The weather pattern has gone crazy. 
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Hilary on March 21, 2018, 08:16:46 AM
We were lucky enough to be taken for  drive  to an olive grove in the foothills of Taygetus near Polovitsa, last weekend.
Here are a few photos of some of the wild flowers we saw
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on March 27, 2018, 11:04:59 AM
A few days ago I posted some photos of hibiscus flowers. Today our Hibiscus rosa-sinensis 'Cooperi' decided to join in.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on March 27, 2018, 11:09:49 AM
Californian poppies are obviously not native to Cyprus but they have become a common sight in some areas of the island, especially in parts of the Troodos Range. The ones in our garden are beginning to appear.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on April 01, 2018, 09:08:07 AM
Following a rare, but badly needed and decidedly welcome, splash of rain the air and ground this morning had a much fresher feel. The plants also seemed to appreciate it, so I extended the time taken in my regular morning walk (it turned into a two cups job!) in order to take more photos of the flowers that were in evidence. Then I had the idea that maybe some forumers might like to have a bit of fun identifying them. So, here goes with the first batch...
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on April 01, 2018, 09:12:54 AM
OK, having eased you into it gently perhaps something a touch harder?
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on April 01, 2018, 09:17:33 AM
Don't relax yet, perhaps a little harder still?
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on April 01, 2018, 09:20:27 AM
And just a few more to finish off with!
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Alisdair on April 01, 2018, 09:50:41 AM
What an amazing array of plants you grow, John!
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on April 01, 2018, 11:44:25 AM
That's just a fraction of the whole, Alisdair. We have a local friend who is a retired schoolteacher and now devotes his time to finding and photographing plants, especially Cyprus native ones. He calls round to our house from time to time to see what's in flower for him to photograph. He called in last Wednesday while we had a group from the Limassol U3A here with 2 visiting members from Slovenia (that's another story) and he told them that Thea should make a mosaic sign for outside our gate saying; 'Botanical Garden'. A bit 'over the top' but a nice compliment all the same.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Umbrian on April 02, 2018, 10:32:19 AM
Gosh John where do you find the time and energy to accomplish all you do?
Enjoyed the challenge but fell woefully short - some are new to me but also the members starts to let me down!
Anyway to show my appreciation of your efforts both in the garden and on the Forum here are my conclusions
1.    Poppy
2.    Nasturtiums.  ( love the 2nd)
3.    Thungbergia
4.    Hibiscus
5.    Phlomis
6.    Lavender stoechs
7.    Coronilla
8.    Iris germanica
9.    -
10.  Gerbera
11.  Salvia?
12.  -
13.  -
14.  Passion Flower
15.  - ? Should know but....
16.  Pelargonium
17.  Solanum jasminoides
18.  Euryops????
19.  -
20.  -
21.  Salvia viridis
22.  Echium candidens
23.  -
24.  White Daisy! But Erigeron  karvinskianus in background.....bonus point?!
25.  Nigella
26.  -
27.  -
28. Durantia " Geisha Girl"?
29.  -
30.  Eucryphia?
31.  Teucrium fruticans
32.  Convolvulus cneorum
33.  Strelitzia
34.  -

Whew - off to do some gardening now.

Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on April 02, 2018, 11:56:06 AM
Well done, Carole, brave effort. Taking them one section at a time, the first is:
Poppy (Papaver rhoeas)
Nasturtiums x 2
You missed the orange flower with the recurved petals.
Thunbergia alata
Hibiscus rosa-sinensis
Phlomis lunariifolia

Lavender yes but Lavendula dentata the leaves don't show.
Coronilla valentina
Iris germanica
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on April 02, 2018, 12:04:27 PM
A few missing from the second batch.
Gerbera yes
Salvia yes, but which one?
Passion flower, I don't know the species.
Pelagonium graveolens
Yes to the solanum but I think we are supposed to call it S. laxum these days.
Not Euryops
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on April 02, 2018, 12:15:11 PM
To finish up.
Salvia but not viridis
Echium yes
The white daisy is Erigeron karvinskianus well spotted.
Nigella yes
The Duranta erecta is a variety called 'Sweet Memories'.
Teucrium, Convolvulus and Strelitzia all yes.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on April 02, 2018, 03:43:07 PM
Carole, I realise I owe you an apology regarding the Salvia viridis as there is some argument about whether or not it is the same plant as Salvia horminum which is the name I know it by. The one we have is a variety known as 'Pink Sunday'. Even this tends to be rendered as 'Pink Sundae' by some. As there is also a variety known as 'Blue Monday' I would lean towards the day rather than the dessert. These plant names can be a minefield. :-\
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Umbrian on April 03, 2018, 06:57:40 AM
It was good fun John and a nice Easter diversion. I find my memory fails me at times with plant names but it is always good to give it some exercise. - remembering new classifications is more difficult though.......
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on April 03, 2018, 08:02:29 AM
I know what you mean. For instance the orange flower with the recurved petals used to be called Senecio confusus, which was easy to remember and meant I wasn't the only 'confused old man' in the garden! Now it seems we have to call it Pseudogynoxis chenopodioides.  ???
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Umbrian on April 03, 2018, 06:02:27 PM
Can't even pronounce that one easily John so shall never remember it!
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Hilary on April 05, 2018, 09:05:51 PM
A couple of weeks ago I wrote about a drive we took in the foothills of Taygetus to see a certain olive grove. On our way we passed these lupins growing by the roadside among olive trees. I was told they might have been sown as green manure to improve the soil. It was one of the days when the sky was overcast and heavy with the dust from Africa
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Umbrian on April 06, 2018, 07:20:24 AM
Beautiful John both in form and colour - a good garden addition especially if they help to improve the soil.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on April 06, 2018, 08:10:20 AM
Hi Carole, much as I would like to take the credit the photos belong to Hilary. 8)
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Umbrian on April 07, 2018, 07:02:53 AM
We have a lot to thank Hilary for.....so thanks again this time to Hilary for yet more lovely photographs.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on April 07, 2018, 08:31:01 AM
Hear, hear! I couldn't agree more.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on April 09, 2018, 06:36:32 AM
No morning walk today, Greek Orthodox Easter Monday, as we have a mix of sun and rain with thunder rolling around the mountains. Hopefully it will improve before the village celebrations get under way this afternoon and evening.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Umbrian on April 10, 2018, 06:44:20 AM
That's very generous of you John considering the drought situation in your area that you have been mentioning.  I on the other hand felt quite cheated when a beautifully warm sunny weekend, with temperatures reaching the mid twenties, was followed yesterday by a day of heavy rain preventing a visit from my wrought iron specialist to take measurement for a proposed archway over a small patio. Not the first time he had had to postpone his visit with the changeable weather we have been experiencing. Che sara, sara.....
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on April 16, 2018, 09:32:56 AM
The early spring weather has brought out a lot of blooms.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on April 16, 2018, 11:18:54 AM
And a few more.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on April 21, 2018, 07:49:09 AM
A much cooler day today than of late, but still no sign of rain!
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Hilary on April 21, 2018, 08:41:38 AM
Lovely flowers.
What is the white one?
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on April 21, 2018, 08:57:58 AM
Thanks, Hilary. It's Dietes bicolor.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on April 23, 2018, 04:53:13 PM
Bit late posting this but it's been a busy day. 'J T Barber' decided to join the party this morning.
Correction, 'J T Barber' is still getting spruced up, this is 'Desert Moon' putting in a daytime appearance.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on April 24, 2018, 06:47:45 AM
Another 'Desert Moon' being joined by, I believe, 'Elektra'.
I've done it again! I got the wrong lady, it isn't the ancient 'Elektra' but a more modern 'Kathy Frost'.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on April 24, 2018, 06:51:52 AM
A few of our more delicate specimens.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on May 06, 2018, 07:11:29 AM
Life has been a little too busy of late for leisurely morning walks, however today we were a bit more relaxed and so I was able to take a few more photos than usual.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on May 06, 2018, 07:15:41 AM
And the rest.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Hilary on May 06, 2018, 08:00:09 AM
What a lot of flowers in your garden
As a matter of interest what are numbers
4 red
5 orange ?
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on May 06, 2018, 08:56:15 AM
Hi Hilary, that's just a selection.
The red flower is what I insist on still calling Senecio confusus although I am told I must now get used to referring to it as Pseudogynoxys chenopodioides. The flowers open orange and then age to the red of the ones shown.
The orange flower is Carthamus tinctorius, (Safflower). It is, I believe, one of the oldest plants grown as a crop. It had several uses. It was used as a cheap substitute for saffron and was referred to as 'bastard saffron', if you'll pardon my language. The seeds were, and are, used to produce safflower seed oil. Textiles from ancient Egypt have been shown to have been coloured using a dye from the plant.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on May 21, 2018, 10:04:32 AM
Not exactly a morning walk today, more of a morning stagger as we arrived back home from the MGS excursion to Italy in the very early hours of this morning. Arose a little later than usual, still half asleep, but was shocked into wakefulness by the sight that greeted us on opening the kitchen door. Our very first flower of Epiphylum 'Candy Crush'.
More about the trip once we have returned to what passes for normality.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Umbrian on May 22, 2018, 07:02:22 AM
Good to see the flower of Carthamus tinctorus named after receiving seeds from you in Italy John.
The name was new to me and I Googled it but to see your 'photo is much better. Lovely unusual colour so I hope I can get some plants going - seeds not being my strong point!
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on June 19, 2018, 02:00:28 PM
On page 9 of this thread my wife posted a reply (#131) of me sorting out the irrigation on part of the area outside our main village church. She has now insisted that I post a couple of photos of how a small part of the plantings is progressing. The prostrate rosemary on the upper tier is beginning to tumble over and soften the edge, while the salvias in the lower tier are filling out and doing a similar job. She has been asked by several people in the village what the blue flowers are.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on June 21, 2018, 07:42:35 AM
Morning walks have been a bit rushed of late but today was slower paced with coffee in one hand and camera in the other.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on June 28, 2018, 06:49:22 AM
Have to be up and about early to catch the flowers of our Bauhinia forficata at their best as, unlike its relative B. variegata that flowers in spring, it waits until the hottest time of the year to bloom.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Alisdair on June 28, 2018, 08:06:12 AM
How quickly to those bauhinia flowers go over, John?
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on June 28, 2018, 11:51:46 AM
They open overnight, Alisdair, and with our tree getting the sun as it rises and with the heat we're experiencing at the moment, 30+degrees daily, they only last a few hours before withering. The photo shows one of the same flowers from this morning taken a few minutes ago when I saw your post, that is around 13.30 our time.
By the way ignore the timings shown above my posts, for some reason they are roughly 2 hours behind the actual time.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Umbrian on June 29, 2018, 06:51:49 AM
What a shame that such beautiful flowers last such a short time. Looks as if there are plenty to come though.....are they scented?
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on June 29, 2018, 07:39:43 AM
It does flower well, often right through July and into August, the hottest period of the year. Unfortunately I've never detected a scent. They don't appear to be overly popular, possibly because they are an untidy tree that needs to be frequently cleared of lots of little dead twigs. This can be a painful job as the twigs and branches are covered in small but nasty spikes. Probably another reason for its unpopularity, you don't want to brush against it. The photo shows what I mean.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on July 08, 2018, 10:26:05 AM
Today's morning walk was a little out of the ordinary. The temperature has risen to heights that make it impossible to work in the garden, or even to walk around it in comfort, so we decided to head up the mountain to see if it was any cooler and also how the Troodos Botanical Garden was faring. It was 2 or 3 degrees cooler but any benefit was nullified by the attentions of the tiny biting midges that are prevalent in that area at certain times of the year. Anyway, we were pleasantly surprised to see that Andreas, the Forester in charge, had scattered some of the seeds we had given him on our last visit at the start of the year. Sunflowers, Evening Primroses, Nigella and Carthamus tinctorius were growing and either in flower or had already done so.
We had also left him some small plants and some of these were in evidence too. A Rolanda petasites, Cestrum nocturnum and various salvias. The photos are not great but they show an area where the salvias were planted, a Salvia interrupta and a Salvia 'Anthony Parker' (an offspring of one of yours, David). Being Sunday Andreas was off duty so we'll have to find an opportunity to go back again soon to see him.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Umbrian on July 09, 2018, 06:54:29 AM
Good work John and nice to see your plants being well cared for. A very brief storm the other day has  freshened the air here slightly but,  as with you,  work in the garden is difficult unless undertaken very early. Time to sit back a bit and enjoy the fruits of well chosen, climate adapted plants.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on July 15, 2018, 07:34:48 AM
Tried working in the garden this morning early but was so hot and humid had to cease and desist. So took out camera and looked for subjects. Even that was not straightforward as perspiration was dripping onto camera screen. Nevertheless some plants are bravely combating the conditions and trying to put on a show.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Alisdair on July 15, 2018, 07:59:50 AM
What a collection you have, John!
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Umbrian on July 15, 2018, 10:42:02 AM
If I am correct one of the flowers featured is Salvia 'Love and Wishes' ?
Mine are standing up to the high temperatures we are experiencing surprisingly well considering it is a 'soft' Salvia - not a woody based one with small leaves. Even one in more or less full sun is coping well but is not as big as those that get some relief. I should add they are all in pots and so do get water.......
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on July 15, 2018, 12:44:14 PM
You are correct, Carole, it is Salvia 'Love and Wishes'. It's the one that Sonia bought for Charithea while we were in Italy in May. As you can see it has already recovered from being pruned back severely in order to fit into the hand luggage. It too is in a pot in partial shade at the front of the house, so it also gets water.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on July 21, 2018, 08:20:57 AM
Very hot, very dry, little water but still some plants manage to flower bravely on.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on July 21, 2018, 08:25:43 AM
A few of the fruits of our labours, although 2 very dry winters that provided little or no deep water has reduced the overall cropping of most trees considerably.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on August 03, 2018, 10:17:19 AM
David, I've been instructed to post the following photos of a couple of the plants that you gave to Thea in May, and have just flowered. Hibiscus trionum and Salvia 'Royal Bumble' (if I've got that right!). She also says to say Thank you.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on August 14, 2018, 07:18:06 AM
It's been a while since I took my camera into the garden while wandering around with my morning coffee, so I thought I'd take a few photos today of what was in flower. Once I started I was surprised at how many there were. I've chosen 10, as per the restrictions imposed by the Forum.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Alisdair on August 14, 2018, 07:44:28 AM
I love your morning walks, John; thanks for all those sights (and scents?).
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on August 15, 2018, 06:08:02 AM
Hilary posted about Pancrateum maritimum and Drimia maritima on her Postage Stamps of the World thread. Our Pancrateum are well in flower now and the first Drimia has put up a flower spike.
Also, despite the intense heat and the fact that we have had no rain for over 6 months our Euphorbia dendroides has decided it's time to start putting on leaves.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on August 27, 2018, 05:19:21 AM
Not a morning walk but an evening one. Last night the Antiquities Department opened the site of the ruins of the ancient city of Kourion, situated on the clifftop overlooking the bay and facing the modern city of Limassol. This was to allow people to wander the ruins in the light of the full moon. They also had a singer accompanied by a keyboard player performing in the theatre to provide a little background music. Not being a great photographer below is the best of the shots I took which doesn't do justice to the scene.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: David Dickinson on September 02, 2018, 09:35:30 AM
Just seen your earlier posting John. Have been away from the forum for a while. The two plant names are correct. Remember the Hibiscus is an annual and you will need to collect seed if you want to see it again next year, Salvia "Royal Bumble" seems to be the easiest plant to grow in Rome. Hot summers, wet summers, cold winters, wet winters - nothing seems to stop it. Flowers for most of the year and cuttings take so easily.  That's my experience of it, anyway. Hope it survives for you.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on September 07, 2018, 07:49:47 AM
Our long, hot summer continues unabated but several of our plants are keeping up appearances.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on September 07, 2018, 07:53:31 AM
In fact so many that I have had to do a second posting.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Umbrian on September 07, 2018, 10:54:08 AM
Pleased to see you have some good yellow and orange specimens John - do you sneak those in when Charithea is not looking!
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on September 07, 2018, 11:18:17 AM
Actually, Carole, I do find the Senna and the Tecoma bright and cheerful. The orange annuals are from seeds that Charithea scattered herself so I take no responsibility for them!
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on September 10, 2018, 06:43:43 AM
Days are still very hot but nights are beginning to cool making the early mornings a pleasant time to be out and about.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on September 14, 2018, 08:11:39 AM
Not exactly a planting combination I would have chosen but Mother Nature seems to have thought differently. They can stay for now until we get around to sorting out that area.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on September 14, 2018, 08:15:14 AM
Back in the days of steam radio there was a song entitled 'Lonely little Petunia in an onion patch'. Well we have our own version, lonely little salvia in a tulbaghia patch.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on September 19, 2018, 06:37:53 AM
A salvia day.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Umbrian on September 19, 2018, 06:52:46 AM
What is the name of the Salvia in the first 'photo John-? A beautiful colour.
I find Salvias very rewarding but the sheer number on offer these days quite challenging!
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on September 19, 2018, 08:20:33 AM
It's Salvia splendens 'Martinus Borg'. I agree that the number of salvias on offer now is totally overwhelming.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Charithea on September 19, 2018, 08:35:53 AM
Carole, I saw this most beautiful Salvia 'Martinus Borg' in La Mortella in Ischia. Alessandra Vinciguerra gave me some cuttings but they didn't travel well. The one in the photo I got through David Dickinson from Le essence di Lea this Spring.  He is a 'hero' of mine just like our Yiannos Orphanos with their helpful nature. I am hoping that this speciment will grow into a big one.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Umbrian on September 20, 2018, 07:43:34 AM
David gave me a lot of salvia varieties when we met at the Lucca flower show recently. His willingness to share is amazing and a trait, that for me, marks out true gardeners who seem to have this desire to share both their knowledge and plants with fellow enthusiasts. Membership of the MGS has brought me quite a few contacts such as this - including of course you and John.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on September 23, 2018, 12:48:02 PM
For our morning walk today we drove to Paphos for a stroll around the old town. We were looking specifically for the 'living wall' that we heard had been created near to the Municipal Market. I have to confess to being undecided regarding an opinion of it.
I was perhaps more impressed by a couple of other walls that we came across in the same area. One had a beautiful graffiti mural and the explanation of the other is on the attached sign. My excuse for including them is that they do have a horticultural link through the amazing roses depicted on one and the stylised crocheted plant on the other!  8)
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Umbrian on September 24, 2018, 06:00:56 AM
Like it or not John, the luxuriant growth on the living wall is quite amazing......I wonder how it is sustained......?
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on September 24, 2018, 08:09:06 AM
Carole, if you look at photo 3 you can see that the plants are all in individual pots in rows. Then on photo 1, not so obvious but down the wall on the far right is a black pipe coming from the roof. From this pipe irrigation lines go along each row of pots.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Hilary on September 24, 2018, 08:52:17 AM
Just to remind you of the living wall in Madrid
It is now several years old and some plants appear to do better than others
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on October 03, 2018, 11:09:02 AM
Not my morning walk today but the result of several years of morning walks taken by our friend Michalis. He has produced a card showing many of the plants that he has photographed over the years, with their names. Sadly my attempting to photograph his photos does not do them justice.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on October 05, 2018, 10:45:29 AM
A mix of flowers and fruit today. The last one is bergamot.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on October 12, 2018, 06:55:17 AM
David, the Hibiscus trionum is one of yours.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on October 13, 2018, 06:01:51 AM
Yesterday I posted a photo of the first (unopened) flower on our Dragon Fruit. This morning we discovered it had opened overnight. My hand is for comparison of size.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Alisdair on October 13, 2018, 07:40:28 AM
What a magnificent sight, John - so exotic!
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on October 16, 2018, 06:19:04 AM
Just a couple of quick photos today as I have to dash out to an early meeting.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on October 31, 2018, 08:36:12 AM
We have just returned from the highly enjoyable MGS AGM in the Costa Blanca, preceded by the equally enjoyable pre-tour in Mallorca, to a Cyprus where daytime temperatures are still in the 20s with no sign of rain in the offing.
My morning walk today was more a closer look at what had survived in our absence and what may need some extra TLC. We were also greeted by a letter in the mailbox from the local Water Board warning that a cessation of irrigation water was a possibility if the situation did not improve in the very near future. Back down to earth with a bump.
We have plenty of seeds from our Pancratium for next year.
The last photos show the 3 stages of mutation of the Hibiscus mutabilis flowers.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on November 30, 2018, 09:15:06 AM
No morning walk today because this happened.  :) Not prolonged, just short and sharp but no less welcome for that! It's freshened up the air, settled the dust and moistened the ground. Here's hoping there's more to come.  :D
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on December 01, 2018, 06:42:40 AM
When we stepped outside this morning we had a pleasant surprise. Despite the rain that we had yesterday and overnight (yes I did say rain, at long last) Epiphyllum 'Kathy Frost' had flowered. Unfortunately the light or the camera or whatever drains some of the colour from the photo, it's actually a shade deeper than it appears.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Umbrian on December 01, 2018, 08:30:01 AM
So pleased you are getting some long awaited rain in Cyprus - I always find it amazing to see how things respond in the garden even after a small amount.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on December 01, 2018, 04:57:42 PM
Today's morning walk was preceded by a fairly long drive to the far eastern end of the island. As the rain yesterday and overnight had softened the ground and made it more workable we decided to pay a visit to a young man we know who owns a cactus and succulent nursery over that way. We have been re-organising areas of our garden in an attempt to combat some of the effects of the increasing shortage of water available for irrigation. One project involves replacing plants at the side of the house that are suffering from the strong summer sunlight they are exposed to, from dawn until early afternoon, with more succulents that can take the heat and lack of water.
The first photos are from that nursery.
While we were in the area we also took the opportunity to check out a Cactus and Sculpture Park that we had heard about.
The second batch of photos are from there.
Hilary, the last photo is for you. This handsome chap reminded us of your post about Athena and her owl.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Hilary on December 01, 2018, 06:17:54 PM
My goodness what a park!
There are a couple of cactus there I wouldn't go near with the proverbial barge pole although a ll my friends had one  twenty odd year ago.

I love the owl
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Bernhard on December 06, 2018, 06:19:28 PM
Today being bright and sunny we ventured out for a short walk on the edge of the village. Not a lot of activity amongst the wild flowers, possibly due to the rains arriving very late this year. Below are a couple of photos that I took.
Anemone coronaria and Lycium ferocissimum, flower and fruit.
:) For this time of the year it really looks very nice.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on December 07, 2018, 09:56:34 AM
Welcome to the Forum, Bernhard. The photos you mention were taken 2 years ago after a spell of late rain. This year the rain has also arrived late with some quite heavy downpours over the last 2 or 3 days. Today has dawned bright and sunny so I was able to go out and assess the situation. Not many plants in flower, mainly the stronger ones or those that enjoy a bit of shelter from the incessant pounding. The Aeonium is beginning to unfurl its rosettes and the seeds of the Nandina add a bit of colour.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Alisdair on December 07, 2018, 10:13:48 AM
John, I'm so glad for you and your rain! When we were in the Peloponnese last week we had several days of pretty heavy rain and hoped that there was so much of it in the system that it would reach you (it was heading that way). Things responded very quickly and enthusiastically, loads of speedy new green shoots after many dry months!
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on December 15, 2018, 09:11:22 AM
After the rain has arrived at long last, with some days being dull but relatively dry, this morning we have bright sunshine and this single Cosmos flower is reflecting the sun beautifully.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on December 23, 2018, 12:56:25 PM
Following a period of much needed rain I decided to see what may be in flower. I was rather surprised at just how many there were.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on December 23, 2018, 01:12:04 PM
Christmas is upon us and as I was walking around I realised that Mother Nature was playing her part in the Festivities, in our garden at least.
In the absence of holly the Nandina was doing its best to act as substitute.
Perhaps the white fruit of the myrtle could replace those of the mistletoe. As for its other attribute whereby people kiss beneath its boughs, the myrtle is sacred to Aphrodite, the epitome of Love and Beauty. Bit of a tenuous connection I admit but maybe that can be forgiven at this time of the year.
The bitter orange, along with its brother and sister citrus trees, is decorated with ornamental baubles.
Who needs candles when they have the fiery spikes of the aloes to brighten up the gloom.
We even have a 'Crown of Thorns' although that does feature rather later in the story.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on December 25, 2018, 09:22:36 AM
Today I thought I would do something a little different for the morning walk, as it is a special day after all. So this is my Christmas Day morning walk.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Alisdair on December 25, 2018, 11:36:57 AM
Stunning, John - lovely to see your garden. A very happy Christmas to you and Thea, from Helena and me.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on December 26, 2018, 10:55:21 AM
As it was a bright morning following heavy overnight rain we decided to pay a belated visit to the clifftop at Kourion, in the area around the Temple of Apollon Hylates, the Ancient Stadium and the ruins of an early Christian Basilica, to see how the wildflowers up there were faring. A few were flowering while others were beginning to show willing. Apologies for the poor quality of the photos probably due more to shortage of sleep from a late night than any excess of alcohol! 8)
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on December 29, 2018, 03:10:02 PM
Having spent the last few days butchering a vastly overgrown bougainvillea we woke this morning to a dull, drizzly day so the morning walk had to be postponed until after lunch. Although usually associated with a different time of year we found that one of our passionflowers had decided it was time to burst into bloom. The Correa obviously didn't want to be left out and is full of flowers too.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Umbrian on December 30, 2018, 09:29:44 AM
I spotted an Iris germanica flowering happily a week or so ago. It was in the planting on a roundabout at a particularly busy part of our town with little chance of photographing it safely. Climate change playing its part or just an aberration?
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on January 16, 2019, 05:29:06 PM
Pushing the morning walk a bit but early on Monday we drove up the mountain to the Forestry Department nursery at Platania to pick up some Damask rose plants for the village church garden. As we were so close we decided to go a little higher to the Botanical Garden and call in on our friend Andreas. The photos show what we found, no-one there. I didn't have my camera but my wife had her i-pad and took the following shots.
The car park
The pond
The visitor centre
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on January 26, 2019, 04:10:49 PM
Today we had not one but three walks. The first was in our own garden.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on January 26, 2019, 04:16:21 PM
The second walk was in our daughter's garden, the first 5 photos, and the third was around a spur of the reservoir from the Germasogia Dam below her house, the second 5 photos.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on February 05, 2019, 10:22:17 AM
Today's morning walk involved a 40 min drive to a 'local' village (which I won't name), to visit a venue (which I won't name). I had been told about this place and on Googling its website the photos looked inviting enough to warrant further investigation. However, on arrival I found it to be closed, and what I could see over the fence left me as cold as the wind blowing around my ears. (Hence the reluctance to name either it or the village in which it is situated).
All was not lost though as, on the drive up, the road was flanked by masses of anemones, and vast areas around the village were covered in anemones and romulea. The rather brisk wind that was blowing made photography a bit hit and miss.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on February 16, 2019, 12:25:32 PM
Not so much a morning walk today as a mid-day dash between the torrential rain showers in an effort to see which flowers were surviving the onslaught.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Umbrian on February 17, 2019, 08:14:07 AM
Not so much surviving but flourishing I would say after your long period of drought John. So glad you are getting good rainfall now.
We are enjoying beautiful sunny days but very cold nights here in Italy and the bulbs are beginning to make show brightening the garden a little in patches. The Calycanthus is over but Lonicera fragrantissima, Daphne and Sarcococa continue to delight with their fragrance. Nice time of the year - full of anticipation for what is to come.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Charithea on February 18, 2019, 01:18:18 PM
I am in agreement with you Carole.  Anticipation of what will pop up next keeps me walking around the garden every morning even in a heavy down pour. The perfume of tha Daphne and Sarcococa can only be immagined now. They refuse to grow here and even the Lonicera struggles. The last few trips to Italian and Spanish gardens  made me aware of how many of their plants are also growing in our garden. The difference was that theirs were in their glory while ours just survived. Now with the heavy and continual rain ours are flourishing. So, long may the rainy season continue.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on February 24, 2019, 11:54:49 AM
Not so much an early morning walk today as a late morning one.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Hilary on February 24, 2019, 02:03:26 PM
What a great collection of flowers today.
What is the second one with the purple flowers.
It looks good enough to feature on a postage stamp!
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on February 24, 2019, 03:20:47 PM
It would have to be an Australian one, Hilary. It's Hardenbergia violacea.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: David Dickinson on February 24, 2019, 08:31:42 PM
I was following your discussion re Italy/Cyprus situation and your present spell of rainy weather and thought I would look around my very small garden to see what flowers were out. Rome is cold at the moment with very cold nights still so Cyprus winds hands down. But there were a few things on flower including some early crocuses which I didn't put in the photos below.
It is interesting to see that the red form of Anamatheca (Freesia) laxis flowers in spring. This pale blue form developed flower buds in late autumn and they opened a couple of weeks ago. That may be because I sowed the seeds last spring and this year it might settle down to spring flowering. I am hoping not for 2 reasons. Firstly, It is nice to have something which is winter flowering and, secondly, this way there will be no cross pollination and I will be able to produce seed of the subspecies 'Azurea'

Anamatheca (Freesia) laxis susp Azurea (which totally refused to behave while having its photo taken)
Bidens (orange) (Quite a lot of flowers but much smaller than those of the summer months)
Buddleja madagascariensis
Erysimum 'Red Jep'
Hardenbergia violacea Alba
Justicia brandegeeana
Salvia 'Anthony Parker' (A few remnants of flowers from last autumn)
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Fermi on February 26, 2019, 12:31:59 PM
It would have to be an Australian one, Hilary. It's Hardenbergia violacea.
Like this one: https://www.anbg.gov.au/stamps/stamp-garden-a-2000.html (https://www.anbg.gov.au/stamps/stamp-garden-a-2000.html)
cheers
fermi
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Hilary on February 26, 2019, 02:15:07 PM
That seems to be the only postage stamp featuring Hardenbergia violacea  Fermi and I don't have it .
However , you have done the work for me .
The link looks useful also
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on February 27, 2019, 09:26:12 AM
A rather wet and windy walk this morning, so I took just the one photo. This Alyogyne huegelii 'Santa Cruz' had buds ready to open yesterday so I was looking forward to seeing its first flowers of the season this morning. A severe thunderstorm overnight with heavy rain put an end to that. This morning dawned very windy with threats of possibly more rain to come so I may have to wait a bit longer to see it at its best.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on February 27, 2019, 01:25:53 PM
The high winds seem to have broken up the cloud and averted the threatened rain, at least for now, so I had another go at photographing the flowers that have now opened. Problem was they wouldn't stay still while I did it.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Umbrian on February 28, 2019, 07:49:31 AM
Lovely John - beautiful arrangement of petals. I tried it here once but with no success. Glad you are still getting rain- we are enjoying weeks of sunshine and unusually high daytime temperatures but really need some rain as we have had very little this winter and the recent Tramontana winds have further dried the soil.


Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on March 04, 2019, 08:50:13 AM
Following a wet Sunday, Monday has dawned bright and sunny although a little chilly. So I have taken a few photos of what is in flower, both cultivated and wild.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Alisdair on March 04, 2019, 09:09:20 AM
So glad you got out for such a set of sunlit beauties, John, after spending so much time locked into sorting out all the stuff you've been having to do, setting up the Society's trip to Jordan next year!
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on March 08, 2019, 07:40:53 AM
Due to a variety of reasons my morning strolls have been severely limited of late, so this morning I made a special effort to go out and see what was in flower.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: David Dickinson on March 08, 2019, 10:28:57 AM
My garden is producing these flowers at the moment. First, a better photo of Anomatheca laxa susp Azurea than the last one. Then, Crocus 'Cream Beauty', Leucojum vernum, Narcisus 'Ice Follies', 'Itzim' and 'Tete a Tete', Scilla tuberginiana, Vinca difformis 'Jenny Pym' and Vinca minor 'Illumination'

I am having  great success with Vinca major 'Maculata' in deep shade and slightly less success with Vinca minor (both the blue and the white forms) in the same area. None of them have flowered but the 'Maculata' has lovely leaves and is spreading nicely. The Vinca minor is slowly spreading but I think I will move it to a slightly less shady place.  This success prompted me to experiment with the two Vincas included in the photos and a purple version of Vinca  minor. They were bought in the UK last are autumn and are still in the pots where I put them,  in constant but light shade.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Alisdair on March 09, 2019, 08:36:02 AM
Thanks for the names, David! (And of course the lovely pictures....)

- Originally I'd wrongly attributed the pictures to John - until Carole kindly corrected me. Sorry, David!
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Umbrian on March 10, 2019, 07:13:21 AM
Think you mean David in this case Alisdair.......but I add my thanks too!
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: David Dickinson on March 13, 2019, 10:37:43 AM
I had another look around my garden yesterday morning (blustery weather so apologies for the poor focus of some of the photos). I discovered that my white variety of Vinca minor had, after what I had said in my previous post, decided to send up a flower! Others in flower were:

Clematis armandii
Crocus 'Firefly' (not as successful as I had hoped in giving the vase "hair" as it is all flower and no leaves at present)
Geranium  macrorrhizum Album
Ipheion peregrinans 'Rolf Fiedler'
Kerria japonica single (now that I have a dappled shade spot I have finally managed to grow this - see my earlier postings on thishttp://www.mgsforum.org/smf/index.php?topic=1575.msg10850#msg10850 )
Narcisus 'Bellsong'
Vinca minor ‘Atropurpurea’
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Charithea on March 13, 2019, 02:45:23 PM
How lovely to be greeted with all this beauty early in the morning.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: arj on March 15, 2019, 04:35:20 PM
These are so lovely, thanks for sharing the photos. I especially loved seeing the Vinca minor, I've not had a chance to see it in a while, it grew so well in the woods by our house when I was a child.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Umbrian on March 16, 2019, 07:31:07 AM
How exciting to be starting your first garden - and in Majorca  - hope you find this Forum both interesting and useful. Look forward to hearing about your successes .....and failures ( that we all have!) Welcome and good luck.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: David Dickinson on March 17, 2019, 10:30:14 PM
Hello Arj, welcome to the forum and, as Umbrian says, you must be really excited this spring to be starting a new garden :)

Today, what was supposed to be Crocus 'Ruby Giant' gave me a bit of a surprise. There are also some flowers opening on what I am presuming is a Freesia sp. I never did find out what they are, exactly. Last year there were no flowers as the plants were cut back to ground level with the 'Beast from the East" This year I must check if there is a 3 pointed bract. ref my posting for help with identification here http://www.mgsforum.org/smf/index.php?topic=2303.0
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on March 21, 2019, 06:40:59 PM
One of the first sights that greeted us on our return from leading a group on a long weekend in Athens.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on March 22, 2019, 07:11:56 AM
Spring would appear to be on the way.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Alisdair on March 22, 2019, 09:08:26 AM
Lovely, John; what's the iris?
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on March 23, 2019, 05:52:11 AM
I'm not absolutely sure, Alisdair, but I think it's a variety of Iris x hollandica.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Alisdair on March 23, 2019, 11:45:07 AM
Very likely: thanks!
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on March 29, 2019, 06:55:28 AM
The unusual weather pattern continues with the rain returning overnight and appearing to be setting in for the day, not heavy but persistent.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on March 30, 2019, 07:09:27 AM
Unable to take any photos this morning as winter seems to have returned with a vengeance. The temperature has plummeted, heavy overnight rain has beaten down many of the delicate plants and the dark grey skies are threatening more of the same. This year the old saying about March coming in like a lion and going out like a lamb seems to have been turned completely on its head.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: David Dickinson on April 01, 2019, 12:39:05 AM
Hi John. Our night time temperatures have certainly fallen and it has been cold the last couple of nights (5°C last night according to the forecast). Days, though, are lovely. Here are a few photos. An Iris which I do not know the name of, a lovely brick-red Osteospermum, my first Eschscholzia californica flower and Daffodil 'Amazing Grace'. The Daffodil is new this year so it remains to be seen if it will survive the summer.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: David Dickinson on April 01, 2019, 12:42:47 AM
Forgot to ask, John, what is the flower in the 3rd photo of your 29/3 post in this thread?

Cheers
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on April 01, 2019, 06:17:41 AM
To be honest, David, I don't know. They came up in a place that we planted Acidanthera bulbs some years ago. They put up foliage but never flowered and then disappeared. Now this year these have come up, they seem to have a similar shaped flower to the ones we planted but the colouring is all wrong.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Umbrian on April 01, 2019, 07:38:12 AM
Beautiful Osteospernum David, something I was hoping to get established in my more sheltered town garden but so far no joy - must try again this summer.
Title: Re: Morning walk - John's non-Acidanthera
Post by: Alisdair on April 01, 2019, 09:41:05 AM
Gladiolus tristis perhaps? It does seed itself around, and flowers quite quickly from seed.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on April 01, 2019, 01:16:22 PM
Certainly a possibility, Alisdair, but if so I've no idea where they came from. The only things I can recall planting in that position were Acidanthera murielae that I brought back from Chelsea several years ago but that never flowered before disappearing altogether. I can't even believe that they were mistakenly labelled as I shared them with my sister in UK before I left and hers flowered for a couple of years before calling it a day.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on April 02, 2019, 06:54:33 AM
Alisdair, Thea might have solved the mystery. She was sorting through some old seed packets and found an envelope with "seeds from cream lily-like flowers, Sparoza" written on it. So, does Sally have Gladiolus tristis growing there?
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Alisdair on April 03, 2019, 08:57:21 AM
Yes, she does - and she complains that it seeds itself about there rather too freely!!
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Alisdair on April 03, 2019, 08:58:44 AM
... and arriving at our Greek house yesterday, we found it in full flower, some already gone over - and it's seeded itself here and there too.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: David Dickinson on April 04, 2019, 12:49:49 AM
Thanks John and Alisdair for the information re Gladiolus tristis. I have just checked and Chantal has it in her seed bank for any members who might be interested.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: David Dickinson on April 06, 2019, 11:15:20 AM
Winter also back here with very heavy rain and cool days and cold nights. At least that might spur the seeds into action. I fear that a couple of weeks ago many of mine may have cooked! A few flowers around though. Freesia "Blue Moon" and a red hybrid. Also an Iris that I vaguely recall buying about 10 years ago (and which I thought had died just as many years ago) has sprung up from nowhere. I will have to seek out some of my old records to see if I can find its name.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: David Dickinson on April 10, 2019, 10:28:34 AM
Today is a very miserable day here in Rome so here are a few photos I took yesterday. Two very pale flowers, Narcissus 'Polar Ice' and Aquilegia hybrid, to contrast with the bold yellow of Erysimum linifolium 'Fragrant Sunshine'. The latter is a new plant but it seems to be doing very well. Let's see how it copes with the summer heat.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Umbrian on April 11, 2019, 07:34:46 AM
Lovely Narcissus David....
I have always thought Erysium should do well in Italy but have never managed to keep them for long. "Bowles Mauve" is an old favourite that I have tried on several occasions and have just obtained again along with a beautiful deep red - orange hybriid one called ' Red Jep'
All the more annoying as I have seen wild yellow ones growing prolifically in old walls in my area.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: David Dickinson on April 12, 2019, 12:32:27 AM
Hi Umbrian

I am having success with perennial Erysimums here in Rome. My 'Bowles Mauve is just coming into flower and has been with me for 3 years. It is in a slightly shady spot but is doing very well. I have taken cuttings as  they have a reputation for being short lived. Let's hope they take. I also have 'Red Jep' which is now full of flowers. (I posted a photo in this thread as it was just coming into flower, p20 (http://www.mgsforum.org/smf/index.php?topic=2229.msg19725#msg19725)). I have had that since last spring and from being a very small plant it is now almost as big as my 'Bowles Mauve' It is in full sun from early morning to late afternoon. The Erysimum linifolium 'Fragrant Sunshine' was bought in the UK a couple of months ago, So far it seems to be doing well
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Umbrian on April 12, 2019, 06:44:27 AM
Thanks for the encouragement David.....if at first you don't succeed.....
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: John J on April 21, 2019, 04:40:06 PM
Morning walk is a bit of a misnomer today. My usual strolls have been rather curtailed recently for a variety of reasons, but this evening I made a special effort to record a few of the plants that are in flower. Not without its trials I might add as the mosquitoes seem to be especially active at this time, and there are a lot of them. My hands and face being the main targets for their attention.
Anyway, below are some of the photos I managed to get.
I don't name the plants that I put on these posts as I like to give members a bit of a test to see if they recognise them. If not they can always ask.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Umbrian on April 22, 2019, 06:50:46 AM
After some very much needed rain last weekend things are really moving in the garden now with Cistus, Iris and Roses bursting into flower. However the purpose of this post is to praise the longevity of my Coronilla glauca that first came into flower in early March and is still going strong providing a bright splash of colour and a rich hunting ground for bees. Some spring flowering shrubs are over very quickly once temperatures rise and the sun more in evidence but the Coronilla seems to thrive in these conditions. Am going to try to add a photo but am having trouble with my Photogene⁴ app still...... 
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Umbrian on April 22, 2019, 06:54:38 AM
Good, managed to reduce that photo sufficiently!
As you will see from the date it was taken in early April and the plant is still in full bloom with no signs of going over yet.
Title: Re: Morning walk
Post by: Charithea on April 22, 2019, 05:01:44 PM
Carole I also think Coronilla  valentina is worth growing.  Our is now setting seeds but it has been flowering for a long time. I was impressed by their size and beauty when I saw  them in Greece a month ago, so on our return I have sown some more seeds in other parts of the field.  I hope I will have success.