The MGS Forum

Gardening in mediterranean climates => Water => Topic started by: Charithea on August 09, 2014, 05:18:02 PM

Title: More water lilies
Post by: Charithea on August 09, 2014, 05:18:02 PM
Test message. I have been learning how to post photos. This was the nearest pic.
Title: Re: Test
Post by: Fleur Pavlidis on August 09, 2014, 06:03:31 PM
When we did a teachers' day at Sparoza I happened to have masses of off-shoots of a nano water lily to give as presents. I demonstrated how they could be planted in any sort of vessel, but the one I kept in a big flower pot has failed to flower so I'm jealous to see yours flowering away. In the pond proper it's fine.
Title: Re: Test
Post by: John J on August 10, 2014, 05:00:12 AM
Fleur, we have 2 of these tanks. They are 80cms in diameter by 50/60cms deep. We got them from Andreas Protopapas, a well-known waterlily breeder here in Cyprus (he's won competitions in the US and provided plants for the RHS garden at Wisley in the past). He orders them from a company in Italy.
Title: Re: Test
Post by: Charithea on August 10, 2014, 07:04:23 AM
Hi Fleur, I have learnt how to minimize pics last night at Markos' birthday party. Now I shall bore you all with my photos. I am sending the photos of the Nymphaea Escarboucle. It flowers non stop. It loves the hot sun.
Title: Re: Test
Post by: Charithea on August 10, 2014, 07:08:50 AM
Sorry this is the other pic.
Title: Re: Test
Post by: Daisy on August 11, 2014, 10:09:47 AM
Your water lilies are looking really good Charithea.
I love Escarboucle. I used to grow it in England. It was free flowering there too.
Is that Nymphaea pygmaea Helvolva in the first photo?
Daisy :)
Title: Re: Test
Post by: Charithea on August 11, 2014, 12:29:07 PM
Hello Daisy, thank you. They are so reliable. The Escarboucle always come first and then the rest follow until Autumn.  The yellow Nymphaea is Moorei or mooreana. It was just opening that is why it looks small and also because I am a bad photographer and I took it from the wrong angle. Charithea
Title: Re: More water lilies
Post by: John J on April 30, 2019, 09:27:54 AM
Our first flowers of this season.
Title: Re: More water lilies
Post by: Alisdair on May 01, 2019, 08:37:38 AM
John, are those in the containers you said were 80cm wide by 50/60cm deep, or in a bigger pond?
Title: Re: More water lilies
Post by: John J on May 01, 2019, 10:16:12 AM
These are both in the containers, Alisdair.
Title: Re: More water lilies
Post by: John J on May 01, 2019, 05:29:33 PM
Completely off the subject but while I was answering Alisdair's question I spotted something in the second water lily photo. Can anyone else see what appears to be a small creature in the water in the second photo? Below the top flower and above the leaf, it's grey with a white face and a large ear sticking out to the side. Or are the years catching up with me and I'm starting to see things?
Title: Re: More water lilies
Post by: Hilary on May 01, 2019, 06:14:35 PM
My goodness, what is it?
Have you gone out to look for it again?
Title: Re: More water lilies
Post by: Caroline on May 01, 2019, 10:33:32 PM
Looks like a specimen of Unidentificatus horridus to me,  or perhaps its just some kind of seed pod?  ::)
Title: Re: More water lilies
Post by: John J on May 02, 2019, 05:35:17 AM
I did check yesterday and there is absolutely nothing there. I took the following photo this morning before the flowers opened and as can be seen there is only the play of light on the water and the weeds. The human brain is hard-wired to attempt to make sense of random images and so may see such things as faces where none exist.
Title: Re: More water lilies
Post by: Alisdair on May 02, 2019, 10:29:09 AM
Naiads seems to have sprung to maturity almost instantly, so if it was a baby naiad she may already now be lurking full-sized somewhere else waiting to spirit you away, John!
Title: Re: More water lilies
Post by: John J on May 02, 2019, 12:53:40 PM
Being spirited away might not be a bad thing, Alisdair, if it was to the Elysian Fields as described by Plutarch.
"These are two in number, separated by a very narrow strait; they are ten thousand furlongs distant from Africa, and are called the Islands of the Blest. They enjoy moderate rains at long intervals, and winds which for the most part are soft and precipitate dews, so that the islands not only have a rich soil which is excellent for plowing and planting, but also produce a natural fruit that is plentiful and wholesome enough to feed, without toil or trouble, a leisured folk. Moreover, an air that is salubrious, owing to the climate and the moderate changes in the seasons, prevails on the islands. For the north and east winds which blow out from our part of the world plunge into fathomless space, and, owing to the distance, dissipate themselves and lose their power before they reach the islands; while the south and west winds that envelope the islands sometimes bring in their train soft and intermittent showers, but for the most part cool them with moist breezes and gently nourish the soil."
Sounds pretty much like heaven to me!