The MGS Forum

Places to visit => Places to visit => Topic started by: Hilary on March 21, 2013, 03:57:20 PM

Title: Ancient Corinth
Post by: Hilary on March 21, 2013, 03:57:20 PM
Spring has come to the village of Ancient Corinth.

An early Christian church.
An olive grove.
Looking toward Acrocorinth
Looking towards Kyllini Mountain
Looking towards Gerania Mountain
Last but not least, a donkey
Title: Re: Ancient Corinth
Post by: Jill S on March 21, 2013, 06:43:12 PM
Nice pics Hilary, not least the donkey!
What are the dimensions/scale of the early church? over here early churches tend to be REALLY small, whereas the one you show looks quite sizeable by comparison. How early, do you reckon? Interesting!
Title: Re: Ancient Corinth
Post by: Hilary on March 21, 2013, 08:20:39 PM
The church must have been huge.
I am afraid I know nothing about it except that it is being excavated and potected in conjunction with the Ancient port of Lechaion.
There are the remains of another huge early christian church  near the Ancient port of Lechaion which you can find reference to on the web.
Both sites are now fenced.
If you look on google maps to the west of Corinth there is what looks like a lake.
This is the ancient port of Lechaion.
The shape of the early christian church, which is 179 meters long,  is between the lake and the sea.
Somewhere I read that it fell down during an earthquake

Title: Re: Ancient Corinth
Post by: Jill S on March 22, 2013, 12:54:50 AM
Heavens!! seriously huge. Thanks for the info, will see what I can find out. I must admit the early christian period in Greece is not one I've ever looked at, I have a feeling it will be an interesting search.
Jill
Title: Re: Ancient Corinth
Post by: Alice on March 23, 2013, 01:29:16 PM
Hilary, how nice to see your photos: spring bursting forth with lovely wild flowers and blue skies. Especially since we in -not exactly mediterranean- England are once again blanketed with snow.
Title: Re: Ancient Corinth
Post by: Hilary on April 14, 2013, 05:16:44 PM
The columns of the temple at Ancient Corinth surrounded by spring wild flowers
Title: Re: Ancient Corinth
Post by: Hilary on May 06, 2013, 06:09:47 AM
The Ancient Diolkos at the Corinthian Gulf end of the canal.
Not many wild flowers left at the beginning of May
Title: Re: Ancient Corinth
Post by: Hilary on September 28, 2013, 02:29:23 PM
The columns and Melia azedarach at Ancient Corinth
September, 2013
Title: Re: Ancient Corinth
Post by: Hilary on November 22, 2013, 11:38:20 AM
The ancient port of Lechaion on a windy November day.
The two moles of the outer harbour  can be seen protruding into the sea.
The inner harbour  has been fenced in  and many Tamarix trees planted along the seaside road outside the fence.
Title: Re: Ancient Corinth
Post by: Hilary on November 27, 2013, 06:20:03 AM
The ancient port of Lechaion
The man made  inner basins were dredged in ancient times and the  silt and pebbles form small hills near the water.
The channel leading to the sea is now closed and the area a resting place  for migrating birds
Since the hills are made of gravel and silt they make a natural gravel garden.
There was only one plant flowering in November when these photos were taken but plenty of plants preparing for the spring
A very exposed windy place as this tree demonstrates
Title: Re: Ancient Corinth
Post by: Hilary on December 08, 2013, 05:35:56 PM
The Basilica of St Leonidas
The remains of this church are next to the ancient port of Lechaion.
It is currently being excavated and preserved
According to various internet sites I read it was constructed either at the end of the 5th C or the beginning of the 6th C.
The length from the apse to the atrium is 223 meters.
Title: Re: Ancient Corinth
Post by: Hilary on December 09, 2013, 07:54:10 AM
Recently I have added three posts about the ancient port of Lechaion and the basilica of St. Leonidas.
Currently the site is officially closed, and largely fenced, so you may not be able to see it at close quarters.
Title: Re: Ancient Corinth
Post by: Daisy on December 09, 2013, 11:50:37 AM
I have been enjoying your photos and information about ancient Corinth Hilary. Especially the port of Lechaion. Fascinating.
Although I must say your later photos in November and December make me shiver. It looks a wild, windswept place.
Daisy :)
Title: Re: Ancient Corinth
Post by: Hilary on December 10, 2013, 09:43:25 AM
Daisy,
A fair exchange as I love seeing the photos of your garden
Title: Re: Ancient Corinth
Post by: Hilary on December 23, 2013, 12:16:21 PM
Akrokorinthos
These photos are all taken from the car park.
In the spring there will be plenty of wild flowers to see, especially Euphorbia and Asphodel
Looking north you see, first across the fertile plain then  across the Gulf of Corinth to Sterea Ellada
Looking south you see the small hill of Penteskoufi and the road leading to Nafplion.
The new National Road is no longer the white scar which it was at first

Spelling
Corinth is now known as Korinthos
Acrocorinth is now known as  Akrokorinthos

Title: Re: Ancient Corinth
Post by: Hilary on March 05, 2014, 05:50:24 PM
A view of Akrokorinthos from below the village.
Plenty of Asphodel and Euphorbia around on the 2nd of March
Title: Re: Ancient Corinth
Post by: Alisdair on March 05, 2014, 06:25:36 PM
Those asphodels are going crazy, Hilary!
Title: Re: Ancient Corinth
Post by: Charithea on March 06, 2014, 10:22:27 AM
Hi Hilary, thank you for taking us on a journey with your photos . I wanted to use the Greek expression for travelling taxidevondas but I don't know how to change language on my iPad. There are so many lovely places to see in Greece. I hope we will be healthy enough to explore they in the near future. Regards from warm and very sunny Cyprus.
Title: Re: Ancient Corinth
Post by: Alice on March 06, 2014, 11:50:03 AM
Really lovely early spring landscape, Hilary.
Title: Re: Ancient Corinth
Post by: Hilary on March 07, 2014, 02:28:09 PM
February at the ancient port of Lechaion
Still windy but very sunny.
Many  of the photos I took  are blurred  because of the wind.
We will just have to go back again
Title: Re: Ancient Corinth
Post by: Hilary on March 21, 2014, 05:28:55 PM
The Asclepium, or rather in search of it.
We went in search of a place which I thought was the Asclepium and had seen several years ago.
The wild plants were too tall  see over.
We found a well fenced area.
Then we saw some walls and an arch.
Euphorbia at eye level.
On our way back we saw what looks like a column base in a fenced field.
Then two sheep enjoying all the fresh greenery.
Our  search for the Asclepium is not finished, we have to go back after visiting the room devoted to it in the museum and studying the map.
Title: Re: Ancient Corinth
Post by: Umbrian on March 23, 2014, 08:15:29 AM
Your travels always make interesting reading Hilary, thank you for sharing them with us and posting the photographs. :)
Title: Re: Ancient Corinth
Post by: oron peri on March 23, 2014, 12:01:01 PM
Fantastic photos Hilary.

Just a small correction; Muscari is M. commutatum.
Title: Re: Ancient Corinth
Post by: Hilary on March 31, 2014, 03:22:18 PM
Umbrian , Oron,
Glad you enjoy my photos of spring in the Peloponnese.
We are just back from a week in Sparta so there mi9ght be some interesting photos, on the other hand they might all be rubbish

Oron,
Thanks for the correction, and I was so sure I had got it right this time.
Title: Re: Ancient Corinth
Post by: Hilary on May 09, 2014, 03:23:59 PM
Isthmus
Looking for flowers for the May Wreath
Ballota acetabulosa, Garden Horehound
Papaver rhoeas, Common Poppy
And various yellow daisies
Title: Re: Ancient Corinth
Post by: Hilary on May 10, 2014, 01:05:43 PM
The Justinian or Hexamillion Wall.
For those of you who enjoy seeing ancient remains.
And for those of you who enjoy seeing road and railway bridges.
Four bridges spanning the Justinian Wall.
Nicotiania glauca, Shrub Tobacco, and the wall.
Reseda alba, White Mignonette , Phagnalon rupestre and the wall. 
Title: Re: Ancient Corinth
Post by: Hilary on May 12, 2014, 03:44:24 PM
Ancient port of Lechaion in May.
The views towards Akrokorinthos were lovely although the bright sun seems to have bleached the colours.
Gerania is the mountain range across the Gulf of Corinth.
Title: Re: Ancient Corinth
Post by: Hilary on May 22, 2014, 02:28:27 PM
Roses in a friend's garden with Akrokorinthos in the background
Shame about the electricity pole
Title: Re: Ancient Corinth
Post by: Hilary on May 27, 2014, 07:20:38 AM
Xylokeriza.
Views of the Oneia mountain range from the village of Xylokeriza.
The Oneia, Donkey, mountains are a low range, 581m. south of the village.
I have heard that there is a sign posted walk along the top of it.
The olive groves were full of wild flowers at the beginning of May
Last but not least the view of Akrokorinthos from Xylokeriza
Title: Re: Ancient Corinth
Post by: Hilary on June 16, 2014, 04:59:56 PM
Another walk at Xylokeriza at the beginning of  June, before it gets too hot.
A sign for a mountain walk, note the perfect pomegranate tree in the background.
Agave and Cypress trees.
Cypress trees with the Oneia Mountain range in the background.
Olive trees and the Oneia mountain range
Title: Re: Ancient Corinth
Post by: Hilary on December 08, 2014, 06:35:39 PM
Akrokorinthos from the village of Solomos, more or less to the south
Title: Re: Ancient Corinth
Post by: Hilary on December 30, 2014, 04:32:07 PM
By the sea at the ancient port of Lechaion.
Mandragora autumnalis braving the wind and the cold
Title: Re: Ancient Corinth
Post by: Hilary on January 16, 2015, 04:32:00 PM
The Basilica of St Leonidas next to the ancient port of Lechaion at the end of December.
Once more only a dandelion in the way of flowers.
This column capital made up for the lack of flowers.
Doesn't it look like a thistle from the side?
Title: Re: Ancient Corinth
Post by: Hilary on January 26, 2015, 03:34:30 PM
At the end of December some of the younger members of our family decided to climb to the top of Akrokorinthos.
They had wanted to do so in the summer but I had put them off telling them that  it was too hot and the grass too tall.
They left the car in the parking place, near the coffee shop,  where the main gates are and passed through the three gates.
That is probably the steepest part and most difficult as the stones are polished with use.
In the photos
My two granddaughters aged 2 1/2 and 7 1/2  are looking down to Corinth on the edge of the sea.
My son, note the coffee cup, is pointing to the mountains of mainland Greece.
The last photo was taken looking to the west and Mount Ziria.

All photos were taken by my daughter
Title: Re: Ancient Corinth
Post by: Hilary on May 30, 2015, 03:28:24 PM
All the gardens in the village of Ancient Corinth are full of flowers at the moment.
Here are a few photos from my friend's garden.
Title: Re: Ancient Corinth
Post by: Hilary on September 02, 2015, 03:25:39 PM
Anyone visiting Ancient Corinth in the summer remembers this tree for the shade it affords!
 
Title: Re: Ancient Corinth
Post by: Hilary on February 08, 2016, 06:38:11 AM
Regarding my post of the 21st March 2014.
What we saw through the, head high, vegetation was not the Asclepium but the
FOUNTAIN OF THE LAMPS.
Title: Re: Ancient Corinth
Post by: Hilary on February 08, 2016, 07:21:35 AM
Asklepieion of Ancient Corinth.
With the help of Google Earth we found the Asklepieion, at last.
It was not difficult to get into the fenced area but difficult to know where to put your feet as there was a lot of vegetation.
 Unfortunately nothing much interesting in the way of wild flowers, just white daisies and
Calendula arvensis at the end of January.
The photos are of
The information notice board.
The bedrock base of the ancient temple.
An architectural fragment.
A capital and a view down to the plain showing the suburban railway, with train,  and the Athens- Patras National Road.
A wall with wild plants in between the stones.
What apparently was a ramp deep in vegetation and
The Lerna Court
Title: Re: Ancient Corinth
Post by: Hilary on February 22, 2016, 08:46:46 AM
Akrokorinthos seen from the west.
The hill to the right of Akrokorinthos is topped by a small castle called Pendeskoufis ΠΕΝΤΕΣΚΟΥΦΗΣ
Title: Re: Ancient Corinth
Post by: Hilary on September 04, 2016, 04:31:51 PM
The frontispiece of one of the volumes of FLORA GRAECA designed by Ferdinand Bauer.
Depicting CORINTHUS.
The books took 34 years to be prepared published between 1806 and 1840
Title: Re: Ancient Corinth
Post by: Hilary on January 08, 2017, 06:33:54 PM
Akrokorinthos seen from the archaeological site today covered in snow.

Akrokorinthos and the spring of Hadji Mustafa which still flows with good water.
For years my husband used to come to this spring to fill water bottles with drinking water
Title: Re: Ancient Corinth
Post by: Hilary on January 09, 2017, 07:29:51 AM
Ancient Corinth in the snow. Not many people there yesterday but we were not the only ones, by all means.
The snow was  melting quickly  in the sun and large dollops were dropping from the trees.
The Melia azedarach looked particularly pretty.

For those of you interested in things archaeological part of the museum has been revamped and the "new" twin "kouri of Tenea"  are on display
Title: Re: Ancient Corinth
Post by: Hilary on April 28, 2017, 06:21:04 PM
Akrokorinthos in April
Many yellow wild flowers.
One photo looking towards the west and the other looking towards the north
Title: Re: Ancient Corinth
Post by: Hilary on April 28, 2017, 06:22:42 PM
Poppies galore today  in Ancient Corinth
Title: Re: Ancient Corinth
Post by: Charithea on April 29, 2017, 02:18:25 PM
Hilary your poppies in Greece seem to be a deeper darker red than ours here in Cyprus.  I noticed this last Spring when we were in Athens. It was suggested that there must be something in your soil that encourages the rich colour. Perhaps next time I am in Greece I should collect some seeds and try them out in our garden.
Title: Re: Ancient Corinth
Post by: Umbrian on April 30, 2017, 07:38:50 AM
I remember thinking just the same Charithea when we were part of a MGS holiday in Greece. As we drove towards our destination on the first day I thought the poppies along the roadside were a different variety because they were such a deeper red to those that adorn our roadsides and fields. Could be the soil I suppose - an interesting experiment to collect seed......
Title: Re: Ancient Corinth
Post by: Hilary on May 01, 2017, 03:16:59 PM
Plenty of flowers for the May Wreath in a field between Ancient Corinth and the sea
Title: Re: Ancient Corinth
Post by: Hilary on April 30, 2018, 07:56:48 AM
A short walk in the village of Ancient Corinth
Title: Re: Ancient Corinth
Post by: Charithea on April 30, 2018, 01:20:40 PM
Hilary, I bet you enjoyed every bit of the way.
Title: Re: Ancient Corinth
Post by: Hilary on April 01, 2019, 06:29:04 PM
I posted in this thread in May 2014 about the Justinian or Hexamillion Wall, six mile wall.

On Sunday we went out to look at a piece of wall next to the Epidaurus road.
This stretch of wall, near Isthmia, turns out to be  another part of the  Hexamillion Wall of which there are several stretches scattered across the Isthmus, some more preserved than others.

When I started walking along an old road next to the wall I was rather disappointed as it just looked like a pile of stones but spring was upon us and there were thousands of wild flowers growing on the sides and on top.

Now I have found this reference to the construction of the wall

Quote
The wall was constructed with a rubble and mortar core faced with square stones

which explains the look of it on the west side, the square stones had found another home .

The east side the wall has the appearance of a  proper fortification with worked stones and two turrets.

There, although, the ground looked flat it was covered by dense vegetation hiding ankle twisting stones; because of this I didnt try to get closer